People can't stop stealing summer's hottest item, the Yeti Cooler

Published September 01, 2016
FoxNews.com

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This summer’s hottest item is actually pretty cool. (YETI)

Stealing a cooler is so uncool, but it’s happening all over the country anyway, …

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Family camping in Idaho saves girl from mountain lion

Published August 14, 2016
Associated Press

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REXBURG, Idaho –  A family camping in eastern Idaho scared off a mountain lion that tried to snatch their 4-year-old daughter away from a…

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Botched castle restoration is deemed a 'heritage massacre'

By Arden Dier

Published March 10, 2016
Newser

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Matrera Castle (Hispania Nostra)

Remember the botched “restoration” of Spanish fresco Ecce Homo back in 2012? Well, th…

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This design features a restaurant built in a canyon cliff face

Published March 10, 2016
FoxNews.com

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Could you enjoy a meal dining high above a rocky canyon? (Tall Arquitectos)

A new restaurant concept could take food to terrifying new he…

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Weird natural wonders you won’t believe are real

Published January 25, 2016

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Conde Nast/Newscom

From Mexico’s Cave of Crystals to waves frozen in time, these natural formations will make you look twice.

1. The C…

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People can’t stop stealing summer’s hottest item, the Yeti Cooler

People can’t stop stealing summer’s hottest item, the Yeti Cooler

Published September 01, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print This summer’s hottest item is actually pretty cool. (YETI) Stealing a cooler is so uncool, but it’s happening all over the country anyway, because there’s high-end cooler brand that’s really, really hot. It’s the Yeti, and it’s a far cry from that Styrofoam box that set you back five bucks at the Piggly Wiggly. That cooler won’t escape a hungry seagull. But the Yeti? It’s certified grizzly-proof. It also doesn’t come cheap, retailing for anywhere from $250 for a small model to $1,300 for a Tundra 350, which the manufacturers say is big enough to hold two large tuna or even three dressed elk. Manufactured by a process called biaxial rotomolding, the Yeti is basically the Lamborghini of coolers. In fact, if you leave a Yeti in the back seat of your unlocked Lamborghini, chances are it’s the Yeti that will be gone in the morning. That’s because thieves have been warming up to the Yeti all summer, swiping the pricey coolers from cars, boats and stores and on beaches all over the country, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. It’s even earned a nickname: the “Redneck Rolex.” In Alabama and Mississippi, thousands of dollars in Yeti merchandise have been stolen from four Sand Dollar stores. Police in Mobile, Ala., suspect a gang of thieves is involved, and they say the suspects have occasionally used a Mercedes as their getaway car. In Kentucky, a couple of Yeti thieves chatted up some men, followed them to their lodge and stole nine Yetis from their pickup trucks and boats. Authorities caught up with the suspects, who now are cooling their heels in a hot cell. The thievery continues in Fairhope, Ala., where police reported 26 Yetis have been stolen this year. In Paducah, Ky., two women were arrested after they allegedly stole $500 worth of soft-sided Yeti coolers from a grocery store. Officials said the women themselves had a soft side, too. They hid the coolers by having two toddlers sit on top of them in their shopping cart. “I’ve seen some bizarre acts and criminal extremes in my time,” Capt. Matt Carter of the McCracken County, Ky., Sheriff’s Department told the Wall Street Journal. “This just goes to show the extreme that some people will go to.” In Odessa, Texas, police finally caught up with the “Yeti Bandit,” who pleaded guilty to stealing dozens of Yetis from truck beds. “When you have $400 coolers,” said arresting officer Det. Sgt. Trae Portwood, “people are going to start stealing them.” That’s for sure, said William Bowers, accused of stealing Yetis and selling them on Craigslist for about a week before...

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Family camping in Idaho saves girl from mountain lion

Family camping in Idaho saves girl from mountain lion

Published August 14, 2016 Associated Press Facebook784 Twitter316 livefyre589 Email Print REXBURG, Idaho –  A family camping in eastern Idaho scared off a mountain lion that tried to snatch their 4-year-old daughter away from a campfire. Idaho Fish and Game said Saturday that the cougar dropped the girl and left Friday evening after family members yelled at the animal. The child had a few scratches but no other injuries. The family was camping near Green Canyon Hot Springs east of Rexburg and had spotted the mountain lion in the area earlier that day. Fish and Game regional conservation educator Gregg Losinski said such sightings and attacks are unusual. With the help of a local hound hunter, agency officials tracked the cougar to a tree a few hundred yards from the camp about 2 a.m. Saturday. Losinski said Madison County Sheriff’s deputies killed the animal. Other campers in the area were also alerted. Losinski praised the family for its vigilance and quick...

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Botched castle restoration is deemed a ‘heritage massacre’

Botched castle restoration is deemed a ‘heritage massacre’

By Arden Dier Published March 10, 2016 Newser Facebook25 Twitter0 livefyre28 Email Print Matrera Castle (Hispania Nostra) Remember the botched “restoration” of Spanish fresco Ecce Homo back in 2012? Well, this might top it. Having stood for more than 1,000 years, Matrera Castle in Cadiz was looking a bit worse for wear when officials decided to restore the National Monument three years ago. Now, people around the world are wishing they’d left the crumbling building alone. The result is a brand new structure with the walls of the 9th-century castle appearing almost as ivy climbing its walls. “They’ve got builders in rather than restorers and, like we say round here, they’ve cocked it up,” a local man tells Spain’s La Sexta, per the Guardian. “What the hell have they done to Matrera Castle in Cadiz?” a woman adds on Twitter. “And we thought Ecce Homo was bad!” A Spanish cultural heritage group says the restoration is “absolutely terrible” and a “heritage massacre,” per the Independent. But the architect behind the restoration says it’s really not that bad. The goal was “to structurally consolidate those elements that were at risk; to differentiate new additions from the original structure, thus avoiding the imitative reconstructions that are prohibited by law; and to recover the volume, texture and tonality that the tower would originally have had,” he says. As for those less-than-flattering comments, “opinions are always welcome and constructive criticism and debate are always enriching,” he says. “But I do think that some basic, accurate information can help avoid some of the prejudices that spring from a simple image.” (This Scottish castle could be washed away.) This article originally appeared on Newser: Castle Restoration Called a ‘Heritage...

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This design features a restaurant built in a canyon cliff face

This design features a restaurant built in a canyon cliff face

Published March 10, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook238 Twitter0 livefyre19 Email Print Could you enjoy a meal dining high above a rocky canyon? (Tall Arquitectos) A new restaurant concept could take food to terrifying new heights. Copper Canyon Cocktail Bar designed by Mexico City firm Tall Arquitectos is perched high on a cliff overlooking Basaseachic Falls, the second highest waterfall in Mexico at 807 feet. Adventurous guests could rock climb up to the restaurant and rappel down after a thrilling meal. The first floor of the two-story building, which would be built into the rocky cliff face, features a restaurant and bar area on one side, with tables positioned strategically around the center. The middle of the floor will be glass, affording guests a bird’s eye view of the stunning canyon below. (Tall Arquitectos) Upstairs, the space boasts an observation deck with chairs, tables and lounge couches. Guests to the falls can even take an after dinner dip in the swimming pool. (Tall Arquitectos) (Tall Arquitectos) For now the bar at Copper Canyon is just a design but it’s not the first cliffside dwelling to strike fear in the hearts of the acrophobic everywhere. Last summer designers at Open Platform for Architecture created a stunning house nestled into a rocky cliff made of wood, glass, and concrete. An even bolder design simply called “Cliff House” featured a house that appearssuspended high above the ocean below. But if you’re looking for stunning space to grab a drink now, check out more stunning contemporary designs from Tall...

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Weird natural wonders you won’t believe are real

Weird natural wonders you won’t believe are real

Published January 25, 2016 Facebook160 Twitter0 Email Print Conde Nast/Newscom Next From Mexico’s Cave of Crystals to waves frozen in time, these natural formations will make you look twice. 1. The Cave of Crystals Conde Nast/Newscom Mexico Mother Nature hid the largest crystals in the world nearly 1,000 feet below Naica Mountain, in the northwest region of Chihuahua, Mexico. The hidden caves were drained in 1975 but miners only unearthed these milky-white selenite crystals—spires of gypsum as long as flagpoles—in 2000. Though they may look icy, the mega crystals are forged in extreme heat, up to 122 degrees Fahrenheit and were developed in mineral-rich water over a period of 500,000 years. Researchers can only enter the cave for short periods of time, and there are plans to re-flood it to preserve the crystals. 2. The Wave Conde Nast/Newscom Utah and Arizona This awe-inspiring rock wave in shades of ochre and crimson unfolds through the Paria Canyon–Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness on the border of Utah and Arizona. First water, then wind eroded the Navajo sandstone, revealing layers of sand that blew through the area during the Jurassic period. Access to “the wave” is heavily restricted; the Bureau of Land Management hands out only 20 permits to the Coyote Buttes region a day. 3. Fingal’s Cave Conde Nast/GMS Photography Scotland Reminiscent of Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland, and just across the sea in Scotland’s Inner Hebrides, Fingal’s Cave on the island of Staffa boasts the same hexagonal basalt columns, but houses them in a cathedral-like sea cave with shimmering turquoise water. Not convinced Fingal’s Cave is superior? German composer Mendelssohn wrote an overture inspired by the acoustics he heard on his visit. 4. Wave Rock Nigel Killeen Australia Like a 46-foot-high cresting wave that’s never going to break, this odd rock formation in Hyden Wildlife Park is a popular photo stop on trips to western Australia. (Travelers tend to assume the surfer pose for pictures.) The wave was formed by the erosion of softer material at the bottom of the ancient granite dome, and the vertical stripes are the result of rain washing chemicals down its face. 5. Snow Rollers Conde Nast/Newscom USA Like a cross between tumbleweed, a hay bale and a doughnut, this natural phenomenon is rarely witnessed; it requires very specific snow conditions and wind speed. But when all the boxes are ticked, as they were this January in Ohio (pictured), the wind rolls an ever-growing snowball and then blows out its middle, creating this bizarre sight. See more weird natural wonders at Conde Nast Traveler More from Conde Nast Traveler Crazy Restaurants in Extreme Locations 10 Things Not to Do in Paris Why Does Airline Food taste So Bad? The Answer Might Surprise...

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9 things no one ever tells you about climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro

9 things no one ever tells you about climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro

By Jo Piazza Published March 09, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook44 Twitter0 livefyre9 Email Print Mt. Kilimanjaro is a climb of 19,340 feet through all kinds of terrain and vastly fluctuating temperatures. (Reuters) When my husband-to-be asked what I wanted to do for our honeymoon, I was stumped. I’m a travel editor. I’d traveled all over the world. We’d met in the Galapagos. How do you top that? Do you even try? We both love adventure and the outdoors, and we wanted a once-in-a-lifetime trip that would leave us with a sense of accomplishment, not just a tan. Then one night it hit me: “We’ll climb a mountain!” What better way to start a marriage than by scaling a high peak together? How symbolic. I paused and added, “What mountain can we climb without a lot of training or ropes?” Related Image Expand / Contract Massive fluctuations in temperature demand wool hats and athletic shorts. (Nick Aster) There are plenty of mountains where you can do that in the U.S.; Colorado alone is filled with them. But this was our honeymoon, and we wanted to get away, far away, to a land without cell service. All the way to Tanzania. Mt. Kilimanjaro, the tallest and most recognizable mountain in Africa, fit the bill. It takes hikers through five different ecosystems – from rainforest to alpine desert to arctic snowcap – and climbing 19,340 feet to the top is one of the most empowering adventures you can experience without serious training. About 35,000 people begin the climb each year. How many reach the summit is an elusive statistic. Related Image Expand / Contract Marching into the alpine desert. (Nick Aster) We hooked up with the adventure travel company Intrepid, because it has a wide variety of dates for different climbs and a good track record for getting people to the top. “Kili” climbs take anywhere from five to nine days, depending on your route and how much time you want to take to acclimate to the altitude. All tourists must register at the base and climb with a licensed guide. And at a cost of several thousand dollars, this isn’t something you do on a whim. This is one for the bucket list. I researched the climb before we left, but there are things I know now that I wish I’d known before I got there. They would have made the climb easier, more enjoyable and less uncomfortable. 1. Kilimanjaro is hard work. The literature describes it as a walk, but just because you don’t need special equipment doesn’t mean it’s easy. Parts of the trail are very steep and feel like they go on forever. There are sections filled with 2-foot-high boulders that feel like a StairMaster...

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Why Iceland is on everyone’s travel radar this year

Why Iceland is on everyone’s travel radar this year

By Janeen Christoff Published February 03, 2016 Facebook677 Twitter0 Email Print Northern lights in Iceland. (Visit Iceland) From budget travel to luxury travel, Iceland can’t seem to escape anyone’s list of the best of travel this year. Luxury Travel Guide chose Iceland its number-one destination for travel this year. The country topped Budget Traveler’s list of Where to Go 2016. Women’s lifestyle website Refinery29 said Iceland was one of the places every woman should go this year. NatGeo staffers picked it, saying that it is one of the only places on earth where the “highlight of your trip (the northern lights) depends on factors such as solar wind conditions and space storms.” Praise has been heaped upon the tiny island nation with a population around 350,000 people. And for good reason. Iceland has something for everyone in this exotic, ice-capped paradise. Movie buffs will thrill at the sight of filming locations for “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” Adventure enthusiasts will love glacier climbing and those looking to get a glimpse of the elusive northern lights have a good chance in Iceland during the winter months. The country is enjoying a boom that is driven by increased tourism investment. There is more airlift, providing travelers around the world with more connectivity to Reykjavik. Hotels are springing up around the country – not just in the capital – and tour operators are creating new itineraries – and more options – that include Iceland. More Airlift Airlift received a major boost with the entry of low-cost airline Wow in the international market. The company took over operations of Iceland Express in 2012 and, in 2014, it had already flown 1 million passengers. The company began serving passengers in the U.S. last year and launched extremely low-cost fares to Iceland from a variety of destinations on the East Coast. Now, in 2016, the company will expand to offer direct connectivity between Reykjavik and the U.S. West Coast this summer. Influx of Hotels The number of overnight stays in the country has also risen. Iceland saw a 36 percent increase from December 2014 to December 2015 – and 89 percent of those overnight stays booked by foreign tourists were in hotel rooms, rather than other forms of rental accommodation. Perhaps this is what is leading to Iceland’s recent hotel boom. New hotels are popping up around the country. Iceland will be the home of a new Marriott Edition hotel, scheduled to open in 2018 and the new Canopy brand from Hilton will open a property in the country later this year. In 2015, Iceland welcomed a crop of new properties around the country. Mengi Kjarnholt in South Iceland is akin to a B&B. It is...

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