Hawaii braces for another foot of snow

Published December 04, 2016
FoxNews.com

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This webcam image shows the CFHT telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island covered in snow on Dec. 1, 2016.  (Canada-France-Hawai…

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Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

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Published November 28, 2016
FoxNews.com

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Escape Vista  (Steve Niedorf 2012)

Long before the tiny-homes craze there was a fond…

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Big Buck alert: Missouri 11-year-old tags 178-inch monster on first hunt

By Kris Millgate

Published November 03, 2016

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An 11-year-old’s first hunt may be one for the record books. Jenna Perryman of Springfield, Mo, shot a 200-pound, 15-point typical whitetail that…

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How to find deer in bad winter weather

By Gerald Almy

Published November 01, 2016

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Extreme Success
It’s no secret that food sources can be hotspots right after a snowstorm. But dealing with the varied weather …

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7 urban adventures for serious thrill-seekers

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Published October 31, 2016
FoxNews.com

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 (CN Tower)

There’s adventure travel and then there’s travel just for adrenaline junkies who think they’ve seen and done it…

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Hawaii braces for another foot of snow

Hawaii braces for another foot of snow

Published December 04, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print This webcam image shows the CFHT telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island covered in snow on Dec. 1, 2016.  (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope via AP) Hawaii is bracing Sunday for another foot of snow, in addition to the 2 feet that landed on the island’s highest mountain peaks since Thursday, The Weather Channel reported. The snow is falling on the peaks of the Big Island of Hawaii, including Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, and the National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the area through late Sunday night. “The snow level almost never gets below 9,000 feet in Hawaii during the winter, but since these mountains are taller than 13,600 feet, 13,700 feet and 10,000 feet, respectively, they get dusted with snow a few times a year,” said Ken Rubin of the University of Hawaii. “It rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days though.” The storm warning stated that an extra 6 to 12 inches of the white stuff may land above 11,000 feet, and winds could reach 15 to 30 mph. The snow, which has been falling since late last week on the Big Island’s volcanic summits, forced officials to close a section of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Fog, heavy snow and icy conditions also forced the closing of the road up to the Mauna Kea visitor station. A flood watch has been issued through Sunday afternoon for the rest of the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaii snow brings out the adventurous, but skiing is not for the faint of heart. The Hawaii Ski Club advises potential skiers and snowboarders to be careful because “there are no lifts, no grooming, no resort, but a road goes to the summit to serve the dozen or so world-class observatories located at the summit. You must have a 4-wheel drive vehicle to get to the summit, which serves as your ‘lift.'” Skiers can take turns driving, picking up other skiers at the bottom of the runs and transporting them back up to the summit. There has been 30 to 36 inches in recent winters, according to Ryan Lyman, forecast meteorologist with the Mauna Kea Weather Center. The Associated Press contributed to this...

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Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

By Katie Jackson Published November 28, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Escape Vista  (Steve Niedorf 2012) Next Long before the tiny-homes craze there was a fondness of log cabins. In 1916, John Lloyd Wright (son of the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright), invented Lincoln Logs. In creating this National Toy Hall of Famer, Wright brought the cabin concept into every other American living room. The first set even came with instructions on how to build Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Abraham Lincoln’s abode. A century later, our cabins can be accused of being too contemporary. However, they still conjure up feelings of comfort and a connection to nature. Whether you’re already a cabin living enthusiast or you’re just bored with hotel rooms, here are 10 cabins worth escaping to this winter. 1. Civil War-Era Cabin Travel back to the 1860s at this cabin built of beams repurposed from historic square-hewn log homes that survived the Civil War. One of the rental properties available at Missouri’s Top of the Rock resort, the 1,100-square-foot labor of luxury and love—the work of Amish craftsman and local carpenters—has commanding views of the Ozarks and Table Rock Lake. It’s a two-story home where good things come in twos. There are two master bedrooms, two bathrooms and two grand porches with golf course views. The hardest part of staying here is deciding whether to soak in the traditional copper tub or to stand under the stars in the outdoor shower made of stone. The Civil War-era cabin is bookable through Big Cedar Lodge for $500/night. 2. The Observatory at Alta Lakes Accessibility is not the biggest selling point of this backcountry cabin perched at 11,300 ft. in the Colorado Rockies. In winter, snowmobiles or cross-country skis are required to reach this dirt road retreat aptly named for its views of the surrounding San Juan Mountains and Telluride ski area. The cabin, which has been seen in commercials and on the cover of Nordstrom’s winter catalog, has two bedrooms and a sleeping loft with double bunk beds. Still, when they’re not soaking in the agate-lined hot tub, guests spend most of their indoor time around the massive wood-burning fireplace or detoxing in the sauna. Rates at the pet-friendly Observatory start at $750/night. (The price includes a complimentary oxygen supply for those needing help acclimating to the altitude.)  3. Tiny-House Cabana Located in Coldwater Gardens, a popular agrotourism destination in Florida’s Panhandle, the Tiny-House Cabana is perfect for travelers looking to stay in a labyrinth of shitake mushrooms, European honey bees, giant sunflowers and the latest aquaponics and hydroponics projects the five-acre property is undertaking. The climate-controlled one-bedroom cabin is designed for a seamless transition from...

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Big Buck alert: Missouri 11-year-old tags 178-inch monster on first hunt

Big Buck alert: Missouri 11-year-old tags 178-inch monster on first hunt

By Kris Millgate Published November 03, 2016 Facebook Twitter Email Print An 11-year-old’s first hunt may be one for the record books. Jenna Perryman of Springfield, Mo, shot a 200-pound, 15-point typical whitetail that green scored 178 inches. After a mandatory 60-day drying period, it will, in all likelihood, clear the 160-inch minimum score to be eligible for the Boone & Crockett Club record books. Why the First Two Hours of Daylight Produce the Most Fall Bronze Jenna shot the deer while afield with her father, David, during Missouri’s youth opening weekend, which ran from Oct. 29 to Oct. 30. Jenna and her dad had hunted most of the day, and as the sun began to set, he spotted a doe about 50 yards away. As Jenna prepared to shoot, David noticed a buck behind the doe and stopped her. “It didn’t look as big when it was that far away,” Jenna told the Springfield News-Leader, “but then when I saw it, I was like, ‘Whoa! Did I do that?'” Not doing what you’re supposed to do can pay off with a filled tag According to Justin Spring, Boone & Crockett Club big-game records director, a mere 474 of the millions of Missouri deer that have been tagged over the years have made the club’s record book. “Even if hers doesn’t make it in, that’s still a buck of a lifetime for anyone, let alone an 11-year-old,” he told the paper. Jenna says she is having the rack mounted and the meat turned into summer sausage and jerky. Midwest Rut Report: Ohio Bucks Are on the...

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How to find deer in bad winter weather

How to find deer in bad winter weather

By Gerald Almy Published November 01, 2016 Facebook Twitter Email Print Next Extreme Success It’s no secret that food sources can be hotspots right after a snowstorm. But dealing with the varied weather extremes Mother Nature can dish out during the tag end of the season can be a lot more complicated. If you’ve booked time off or only have weekends free, you can’t wait for perfect weather. You need to adapt both where you hunt and your strategy to whitetails’ weather-influenced movement patterns. Here’s a guide to hunting tactics for eight extreme late-season weather conditions. Opening day has its draws, but there’s nothing quite like a late-season pheasant hunt 1. Heavy Snowfall/Blizzard You have three options here: • Hunt before it hits. Deer know when storms are coming, and they feed heavily six to 18 hours before heavy snows set in. Leave work early, take a day off, call in sick—do whatever it takes to be on a current food source before the storm hits. Orchards, food plots, oak flats that still have acorns, and fields of soybean, wheat, and radish can all be productive pre-storm stakeouts. In high-pressure areas, check out secondary foods like raspberry, honeysuckle, greenbrier, and plum thickets. • Hunt mid-storm. Put on tall boots or gaiters, wool, and waterproof outer clothing. Look for bucks hunkered down in sheltered areas, such as conifer thickets, brush, and blowdowns. Pinpoint this cover on the lee side of mountains and hills, on benches, or even in valleys where deer can find some escape from the worst of the storm. Still-hunt carefully along the edges. • Hunt post-storm. Find the best remaining food sources and take a stand downwind. Deer will be moving. They have to be—survival demands they get food after being holed up, sometimes for days. How to Skin Rabbits and Squirrels 2. Ice and Sleet These can be even worse for deer than snow because the precipitation penetrates their coats instead of building up an insulating cover on it. Bucks seldom move well just before ice events, as these typically follow low-barometer periods (which are poor for movement) and often start as cold, chilling rain. Focus on the same spots outlined above for snowstorms. Finding evergreens is vital for deer now, since deciduous trees and brush offer virtually no protection. Bucks will be concentrated, so drive 1- to 5-acre pockets of evergreens. Have two flankers work the outer edge slightly ahead of a single hunter who zigzags up the middle of the conifers. Post other hunters at the end, or along ditches and side strips of cover that offer escape routes. 3. Light Snowfall Bucks move well in light snow, often seeking a late-cycling doe or...

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7 urban adventures for serious thrill-seekers

7 urban adventures for serious thrill-seekers

By Erin Gifford Published October 31, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter Email Print  (CN Tower) There’s adventure travel and then there’s travel just for adrenaline junkies who think they’ve seen and done it all. Fly a plane above the Vegas Strip while doing aerobatic loops. Or drive a race car at triple-digit speeds around the iconic Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval. You can even walk hands-free along the ledge of Toronto’s CN Tower. Fight your fears and get ready for once-in-a-lifetime, heart-racing experiences. You only live once, right? 1. Go Skydiving in Dubai SkyDive Dubai There are plenty of ways to enjoy Dubai’s dramatic skyline, but jumping out of a plane at 13,000 feet, then going into a 120 mph freefall before popping open your parachute may be the most adrenaline-inducing. Open your eyes for incredible views of Palm Jumeirah Island and the skyscraper-filled oasis. Your heart won’t stop racing until well after you’re back on the ground. Prices start at $545 for a tandem dive at SkyDive Dubai. 2. Walk Along the Ledge of the CN Tower in Toronto CN Tower It’s one thing to take the elevator to the top of the CN Tower, but it’s another beast to walk along the ledge– 1,200 feet above the ground. Not for the faint of heart, this literal skywalk will push your fear factor limit as you move around, hands-free. Look out for stunning views of the city skyline, as well as the Toronto Islands and the shoreline of Lake Ontario. Prices start at $195 for one EdgeWalk at the CN Tower. 3. Fly Aerobatics in Las Vegas Sky Combat Ace High above the Las Vegas Strip, you’ll do loops, dives, spins and barrel rolls. You plan the routine, you fly the plane. Just in case, guests are guided by an expert aerobatic pilot who sits in the back. Perfect for Maverick-wannabes. If that’s not thrilling enough, try your hand at aerial combat. Prices start at $599 per person for the you-fly-the-plane Top Gun package with Sky Combat Ace. 4. Ride an Outdoor Glass Slide in Los Angeles OUE Skyspace LA At 1,000 feet above downtown Los Angeles, just 1-and-a-quarter inches of glass keeps you from plummeting 70 floors at the U.S. Bank Tower. But don’t let that scare you. Enjoy the intense rush, as well as the incredible city views, as you glide along the newly installed 45-foot outdoor glass Skyslide. Prices start at $33 per adult, $27 per child for a trip down the Skyslide and access to the observation decks. 5. Scamper Across Rooftops in Stockholm Takvandring There are guided city tours and then there are guided tours where you walk along catwalks, climb ladders and scamper across...

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People can’t stop stealing summer’s hottest item, the Yeti Cooler

People can’t stop stealing summer’s hottest item, the Yeti Cooler

Published September 01, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print This summer’s hottest item is actually pretty cool. (YETI) Stealing a cooler is so uncool, but it’s happening all over the country anyway, because there’s high-end cooler brand that’s really, really hot. It’s the Yeti, and it’s a far cry from that Styrofoam box that set you back five bucks at the Piggly Wiggly. That cooler won’t escape a hungry seagull. But the Yeti? It’s certified grizzly-proof. It also doesn’t come cheap, retailing for anywhere from $250 for a small model to $1,300 for a Tundra 350, which the manufacturers say is big enough to hold two large tuna or even three dressed elk. Manufactured by a process called biaxial rotomolding, the Yeti is basically the Lamborghini of coolers. In fact, if you leave a Yeti in the back seat of your unlocked Lamborghini, chances are it’s the Yeti that will be gone in the morning. That’s because thieves have been warming up to the Yeti all summer, swiping the pricey coolers from cars, boats and stores and on beaches all over the country, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. It’s even earned a nickname: the “Redneck Rolex.” In Alabama and Mississippi, thousands of dollars in Yeti merchandise have been stolen from four Sand Dollar stores. Police in Mobile, Ala., suspect a gang of thieves is involved, and they say the suspects have occasionally used a Mercedes as their getaway car. In Kentucky, a couple of Yeti thieves chatted up some men, followed them to their lodge and stole nine Yetis from their pickup trucks and boats. Authorities caught up with the suspects, who now are cooling their heels in a hot cell. The thievery continues in Fairhope, Ala., where police reported 26 Yetis have been stolen this year. In Paducah, Ky., two women were arrested after they allegedly stole $500 worth of soft-sided Yeti coolers from a grocery store. Officials said the women themselves had a soft side, too. They hid the coolers by having two toddlers sit on top of them in their shopping cart. “I’ve seen some bizarre acts and criminal extremes in my time,” Capt. Matt Carter of the McCracken County, Ky., Sheriff’s Department told the Wall Street Journal. “This just goes to show the extreme that some people will go to.” In Odessa, Texas, police finally caught up with the “Yeti Bandit,” who pleaded guilty to stealing dozens of Yetis from truck beds. “When you have $400 coolers,” said arresting officer Det. Sgt. Trae Portwood, “people are going to start stealing them.” That’s for sure, said William Bowers, accused of stealing Yetis and selling them on Craigslist for about a week before...

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Family camping in Idaho saves girl from mountain lion

Family camping in Idaho saves girl from mountain lion

Published August 14, 2016 Associated Press Facebook784 Twitter316 livefyre589 Email Print REXBURG, Idaho –  A family camping in eastern Idaho scared off a mountain lion that tried to snatch their 4-year-old daughter away from a campfire. Idaho Fish and Game said Saturday that the cougar dropped the girl and left Friday evening after family members yelled at the animal. The child had a few scratches but no other injuries. The family was camping near Green Canyon Hot Springs east of Rexburg and had spotted the mountain lion in the area earlier that day. Fish and Game regional conservation educator Gregg Losinski said such sightings and attacks are unusual. With the help of a local hound hunter, agency officials tracked the cougar to a tree a few hundred yards from the camp about 2 a.m. Saturday. Losinski said Madison County Sheriff’s deputies killed the animal. Other campers in the area were also alerted. Losinski praised the family for its vigilance and quick...

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