Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock) Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeking one last look at the nation’s best fall foliage. America offers plenty of beautiful locations for marveling at the changing colors of the season, whether you’re up north, down south, or even out west. So bundle up, grab some apples and get outside to leaf-peep away at nature’s dazzling display. The closer we get to winter, however, certain parks, attractions and locations may close, so be sure to double-check before your head out. NORTHEAST Acadia National Park, Maine Visit the beautiful Acadia National Park and scale Cadillac Mountain, the tallest mountain in the park and the tallest along the eastern American coast. Not only is this a prime place to view the sunrise, but the 27-mile Park Loop Road system that winds around the mountain offers views of the coastal forests and shoreline. Peak season for leaf-peeping is generally in mid-October, but the state has a fall foliage website that’s updated weekly, so you can determine the best time to visit. After you’ve had your fill of fall colors, head to the coastal town of Bar Harbor, full of history, shops and delicious restaurants. The Catskills, New York The Catskills are lovely in the autumn. View fall foliage in the great outdoors, or take a hikeon one of the popular hiking trails in the Catskill Mountains. The area is also great for a scenic drive where you can see the historic covered bridges that date back to the 1800s. Be sure to see the many waterfalls in the region as well, with Kaaterskill Falls being the tallest cascading waterfall in New York State. A fall foliage report for the state can be viewed here. BEST TRANSITIONAL JACKETS FOR FALL Pocono Mountains, Pennsylvania For amazing leaf-peeping and a good time, head to the Pocono Mountains. Consult the fall foliage forecast before you plan your trip, and if you want to be extra sure the leaves are at optimal color, check out their live cameras. Visitors can take a scenic train ride or trail ride through the region or even an air tour to see the changing foliage. (You know you are going to a superb area for leaf peeping when they have a leaf peeping FAQ available.) Mount Washington, New Hampshire Mount Washington State Park sits atop the summit of the highest peak in the Northeast. The area offers expansive views of up to 130-miles on a clear day, surrounded by the 750,000-acre White Mountain National Forest. If you are not looking to hike up the mountain, there is a scenic overlook with vehicle access. Note that the park (summit building) is closed from November to April. But another way...

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The ‘Devil’s Swimming Pool’ on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

The ‘Devil’s Swimming Pool’ on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters) Victoria Falls, without question, should be on every serious traveler’s bucket list — especially adrenaline junkies who are willing to risk it all for a once-in-a-lifetime experience. The 354-foot-high falls, which are one of the seven natural wonders of the world, are a truly stunning sight to see. As HuffPost reports, the mighty river above pours 250,000 gallons of water per second off the cliff and into the waters below. More From Travel + Leisure Axe-throwing Might Be the Cool (and Terrifying) New Bar Game to Play Get $329 Round-trip Tickets to Greece With Emirates Supermodel Miranda Kerr Shares Her 5 Best In-flight Beauty Secrets The World’s Longest Zip Line Will Reach Speeds of 80 Miles Per Hour But while the power, beauty, and sheer force of the falls leaves most people with a sense of respectful fear, for others, it simply makes them want to dive right in. And luckily for them, for a few short months a year you can. Atop the falls, tucked away in a small sliver of space next to Livingstone Island, sits a teeny, tiny pocket of water known as the Devil’s Swimming Pool. It is there that adventure-seekers can dive in, be pushed to the brink of disaster, and hang over the top to check out the death-defying view. If you’re interested in experiencing this thrill, you need to plan your travels very carefully. According to Zambia Tourism, the pool is only accessible during the dry months from mid-August to mid-January, as the river’s levels drop substantially to reveal the pool below. “For the rest of the year, anyone foolish enough to enter the waters would be instantly swept to their deaths,” the tourism site explained. “But when levels drop, the natural rock walls of the Devil’s Pool come close enough to the surface to form a barrier and stop swimmers [from] being carried away.” So if you’re highly adventurous and just a little bit crazy, head out for the thrill of a lifetime. Just make sure to book through a certified guide...

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her ‘disgusting’

Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her ‘disgusting’

Fox News Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock) Hunting enthusiast Jessica Grays says she’s “thankful” for the multiple death threats she’s received after images of her Alaskan moose hunt went viral late last month, as they’ve since resulted in speaking gigs and sponsorships. “Thank you for the amount of HATE and death threats you have all sent my way,” wrote Grays in response to the negative comments on her Facebook photos. “It has created quite the media stir bringing this to a National Platform where I have media, newspaper, huntings [sic] blogs, radio stations and women’s rights groups contacting me to be spokesperson and sponsorships from it!” HUNTING EXPERT EVA SHOCKEY ON WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE WILD Grays initially posted the photos from her hunt on Sept. 19, sharing several pics that depicted her and a hunting companion — presumably her husband — harvesting a bull moose. “A HUGE CONGRATULATIONS to my partner in crime on harvesting this MONSTER BULL!” Grays wrote alongside the photo. Grays also shared photos of herself holding the bull’s gigantic horns after they were removed from the animal’s carcass. Soon afterward, Grays’ Facebook page began to flood with comments from critics who disapproved of her lifestyle, some of whom called Grays and her friend “disgusting.” Several, too, hoped that Grays might receive some kind of karmic retribution after killing the animal. Supporters, meanwhile, rushed in to congratulate Grays on the kill. Others also argued that she’s actually helping to conserve the moose population in Alaska by thinning the herds. 6 WAYS TO FIND A BUCK YOU ALREADY SCARED OFF In her follow-up post — the one in which she thanks the haters — Grays too argued that her detractors were not educated on the hunting laws in Alaska, or the “environmental impact that controlled lawful hunting provides” to the area. “Accusing someone of murder when they hunt an animal is like accusing jet pilots of global warming …  it’s intellectually irresponsible and brings light to the greater issue, mental illness of those who make such ignorant claims,” she wrote. Grays added that, in addition to herself, her family has been “ambushed” with death threats and “called the most disgusting and filthy and evil names” in response to her photos. She then suggested her critics leave her alone and “go hug a tree.” FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS Grays also issued a statement to Yahoo, telling them she’s saddened by the response to her photos, especially in the wake of the devastating tragedy in Las Vegas. “I find it unfortunate that the day after we as...

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off

Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off

By Gerald Almy Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock) “That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly held off hunting until conditions were absolutely perfect was gone … forever, I assumed, when my arrow flew high and he bounded away in a panic. That’s exactly what many hunters believe, whether they whiff a shot, bump a buck while heading to their stand, or get busted on watch. Sure, you might get a second opportunity on a young deer, but an older buck? Not a chance. In a crowded public area, that may be true. But in most cases, you shouldn’t be so quick to write off a mature buck that you bump just once. Handle things right and you could get a second chance. IS 2017 THE YEAR OF THE RECORD WHITETAIL? First, consider what happened. How spooked is the buck? A whitetail that just vaguely notices movement or scents you isn’t likely to permanently leave the area or become “unhuntable.” On the other hand, a buck that has three senses alerted — scent, sight, and hearing — is much tougher to get a second crack at. But the situation isn’t hopeless. How thick was the cover? Deer in open areas may run a half mile. In dense cover, a buck might only bound 150 yards and hunker down. Analyze exactly where the buck was and what he was doing. Was he traveling, feeding, hooked up with a doe, bedded in thick cover, pushed out by a drive? Answers to these questions will help you decide how to set up your rematch. Sometimes waiting several days and returning to the same spot is best if that’s the ultimate ambush location. In most cases, a strategic move is called for. HOW TO KEEP YOUR LAND, AND YOUR DEER, A SECRET Here are six spooked-buck scenarios and how to deal with them. #1. Scouting Bump You get a free pass here. Even an older whitetail buck bumped during the preseason will not likely alter his movements based on one encounter. Back off quietly and plan your hunting strategy as normal. Only now you have one extra key piece of information — precisely where the buck was at a specific time of day. #2. Transition Corridor I missed that 10-point in this type of setup. A buck typically uses several routes to get from daytime bedding cover to evening staging ­areas. Spook him and he probably won’t give this path up entirely. But he’ll likely switch for a while to another hollow, strip of vegetation, or spur ridge. Either wait three or four days and...

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire

How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire

By Tim MacWelch Published June 01, 2017 A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch) Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built fireplaces in their log cabins — and more remote forebears burned fires in whatever structure they called home. 3 ODD TECHNIQUES FOR PRIMITIVE FISHING And since it’s not wise to have a fire in a primitive hut made of sticks and dry vegetation (or a cave, for that matter), it’s good to know of other ways to heat your living and sleeping area. By digging a hot rock heating pit in the dirt floor of a shelter, you can enjoy the heat of a fire – with far less danger to yourself and your shelter. Here’s how. Start by digging a small pit in the floor of your shelter, a little bigger than the bowling ball-sized rock that you will be using to transfer heat. Dig the hole to match the rock’s size and shape, and find a flat rock to cover the pit. Make sure that you get your two rocks from a dry location (water-logged rocks tend to explode when heated, so do not use rocks pulled from rivers, streams, and ponds). Ensure that everything fits together well before you heat up the stone, since a 1200-degree-F rock isn’t a fun thing to juggle. You could even recess the hole of the pit surrounding the cover, so the flat rock sits flush with the dirt floor (not a trip hazard). SURVIVAL SKILL: CATCH YOUR OWN BAIT When it’s time to use your set-up, heat up your pit stone in a fire for about an hour (but don’t heat the lid stone). Carry the stone to the pit (a shovel works well), and drop it in. Seal the pit with your flat stone lid, and bask in the radiant heat that will last for several hours. 5 CLUES FOR TRACKING WILD ANIMALS (WITHOUT TRACKS) For sustained heat, you could always have another rock of a similar shape and size to your first rock at the ready, so that when the first rock is done cooling off, the second rock can be swapped in its place to keep the heat going. This trick works best in very dry soil and with a red-hot rock. Just clear all flammables out of the way as you move the near-molten stone toward the waiting pit! 5 EARLY-SUMMER TREES THAT ARE MOST USEFUL FOR...

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4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston Published May 01, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These tactics are for all the other times. The classic spring-morning turkey setup is classic for a reason: It works, at least some of the time. The birds are gathered in one spot—their roost tree—and they are usually vocal and callable. But every veteran turkey hunter knows that even a sure-thing flydown strut-buster can sputter and fail. Here are four ways to salvage what remains of your day. Tactic #1 Kill a Canyon Gobbler The toughest toms to tag can be those that hang out in vertical landscapes—the steep slopes of Western canyons or the corduroy country of Appalachia and the Northeast. Sometimes the terrain is so vertical, you can call a gobbler to 15 yards and still not see it. When you finally do, just his red head pops up, and the rest of the bird remains hidden by the hill. Canyon crossers are another challenge. A tom might roost on one side, fly down to the other, and climb the opposite rim to strut. In those cases, you may need to ford a creek and climb 500 feet to reach him. The best way to circumvent turkey troubles in vertical country is to look for terrain features that can help you get the drop on incoming gobblers. 1. Glass a Rim Strutter Gobblers will strut and preen in the woods and glades of canyon slopes, but often they hike up to the canyon rim and strut there, especially if it borders a pasture or crop field. You can watch for this from an elevated lookout. Use a good binocular and back it up with a spotting scope. In the West, we sometimes glass rim-edge turkeys from 2 or 3 miles away, usually from the opposite side of the canyon. Move in when you’ve identified a popular edge, either using the steep ridge to hide your approach from below or finding little creases and rivulets that can hide you if you need to drop in from above. 2. Locate Roosts Like turkeys everywhere, canyon toms have preferred roost sites—for a few nights in a row at least. Listen for gobbles in the evening or before dawn to pinpoint these places, then set up on the rim nearest the bird, uphill of the roost, and try calling him to you. 3. Deke the Bench Toms will walk and strut on steep ground, but they’re easier to see and shoot when they’re on flat ground. Most canyon walls will have a few meadows on benches or gentler south-facing...

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch Published April 04, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life) For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill is a great approach. This cooking method consists of a rack of fresh live sticks or branches, set up with a fire underneath. This grill acts very much like a metal cooking grill, and you may be able to get several uses out of your sticks before they begin to burn. These sticks can be supported in different ways, and you can build the grill in any size or shape that you like. Square, rectangular and triangular shapes are popular, and these can range in size from tiny to huge. I have built several massive grills over the years, the largest of which held enough food to feed 70 people. READ: 15 CRAZY CAMPING AND SURVIVAL HACKS To build your own, an easily adaptable construction method involves stakes or small posts that are driven into the ground to hold the rack. Cut four stakes, 1 yard long, each with a side branch at the end. Whittle a point on the end that doesn’t fork, and drive these into the ground about 8-10 inches. Set two stout green-wood poles — green wood being freshly cut wood that hasn’t dried out — in the forks, and lay a rack of green sticks perpendicular to the poles. Maintain a nice bed of coals and low flames to grill your meats and vegetables to perfection. I love roasting sweet corn this way, just as people have for centuries. And if you’re looking for a grill with greater stability, try a tripod grill. Lash three crosspieces to the outside of a large tripod and then lay your green-wood rack on top of the cross members. Use vines, rawhide strips or leather thongs to lash the crosspieces since there will be a fire nearby — synthetic rope may melt and natural fiber rope may burn this close to the flames. If either one yields to the fire, your rack and your food will drop into the flames. 3 TIPS FOR FINDING BETTER TINDER IN THE FIELD I’ve learned a lot about green-wood grills over the years, mostly from accidents and mistakes. Now you can take advantage of that experience and save yourself some trouble. When cooking with this grill, it’s best to: 1. Have a good bed of coals fed with hardwoods if possible. 2. Watch where the smoke goes. This shows you where your heat is going, and place your food accordingly. Place it in the smoke for more heat, near the smoke for less heat. 3. Prop up flat stones against the...

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