4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

Facebook Twitter livefyre Print

 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

Read more

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch

Published April 04, 2017

Facebook Twitter livefyre Print

Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life)

For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill…

Read more

Outdoor Channel's Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017
FoxNews.com

Facebook Twitter livefyre Print

Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel)

Steve West …

Read more

New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo

Published March 21, 2017

Facebook Twitter livefyre Print

 (iStock)

New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms.

According to a Bloomberg report, t…

Read more

Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017
FoxNews.com

Facebook Twitter livefyre Print

More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock)

Think people are all about super luxurious getaway…

Read more

4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston Published May 01, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These tactics are for all the other times. The classic spring-morning turkey setup is classic for a reason: It works, at least some of the time. The birds are gathered in one spot—their roost tree—and they are usually vocal and callable. But every veteran turkey hunter knows that even a sure-thing flydown strut-buster can sputter and fail. Here are four ways to salvage what remains of your day. Tactic #1 Kill a Canyon Gobbler The toughest toms to tag can be those that hang out in vertical landscapes—the steep slopes of Western canyons or the corduroy country of Appalachia and the Northeast. Sometimes the terrain is so vertical, you can call a gobbler to 15 yards and still not see it. When you finally do, just his red head pops up, and the rest of the bird remains hidden by the hill. Canyon crossers are another challenge. A tom might roost on one side, fly down to the other, and climb the opposite rim to strut. In those cases, you may need to ford a creek and climb 500 feet to reach him. The best way to circumvent turkey troubles in vertical country is to look for terrain features that can help you get the drop on incoming gobblers. 1. Glass a Rim Strutter Gobblers will strut and preen in the woods and glades of canyon slopes, but often they hike up to the canyon rim and strut there, especially if it borders a pasture or crop field. You can watch for this from an elevated lookout. Use a good binocular and back it up with a spotting scope. In the West, we sometimes glass rim-edge turkeys from 2 or 3 miles away, usually from the opposite side of the canyon. Move in when you’ve identified a popular edge, either using the steep ridge to hide your approach from below or finding little creases and rivulets that can hide you if you need to drop in from above. 2. Locate Roosts Like turkeys everywhere, canyon toms have preferred roost sites—for a few nights in a row at least. Listen for gobbles in the evening or before dawn to pinpoint these places, then set up on the rim nearest the bird, uphill of the roost, and try calling him to you. 3. Deke the Bench Toms will walk and strut on steep ground, but they’re easier to see and shoot when they’re on flat ground. Most canyon walls will have a few meadows on benches or gentler south-facing...

Read More

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch Published April 04, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life) For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill is a great approach. This cooking method consists of a rack of fresh live sticks or branches, set up with a fire underneath. This grill acts very much like a metal cooking grill, and you may be able to get several uses out of your sticks before they begin to burn. These sticks can be supported in different ways, and you can build the grill in any size or shape that you like. Square, rectangular and triangular shapes are popular, and these can range in size from tiny to huge. I have built several massive grills over the years, the largest of which held enough food to feed 70 people. READ: 15 CRAZY CAMPING AND SURVIVAL HACKS To build your own, an easily adaptable construction method involves stakes or small posts that are driven into the ground to hold the rack. Cut four stakes, 1 yard long, each with a side branch at the end. Whittle a point on the end that doesn’t fork, and drive these into the ground about 8-10 inches. Set two stout green-wood poles — green wood being freshly cut wood that hasn’t dried out — in the forks, and lay a rack of green sticks perpendicular to the poles. Maintain a nice bed of coals and low flames to grill your meats and vegetables to perfection. I love roasting sweet corn this way, just as people have for centuries. And if you’re looking for a grill with greater stability, try a tripod grill. Lash three crosspieces to the outside of a large tripod and then lay your green-wood rack on top of the cross members. Use vines, rawhide strips or leather thongs to lash the crosspieces since there will be a fire nearby — synthetic rope may melt and natural fiber rope may burn this close to the flames. If either one yields to the fire, your rack and your food will drop into the flames. 3 TIPS FOR FINDING BETTER TINDER IN THE FIELD I’ve learned a lot about green-wood grills over the years, mostly from accidents and mistakes. Now you can take advantage of that experience and save yourself some trouble. When cooking with this grill, it’s best to: 1. Have a good bed of coals fed with hardwoods if possible. 2. Watch where the smoke goes. This shows you where your heat is going, and place your food accordingly. Place it in the smoke for more heat, near the smoke for less heat. 3. Prop up flat stones against the...

Read More

Outdoor Channel’s Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Outdoor Channel’s Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel) Steve West has finally completed his North American caribou hunt — and with a world-record bull. Three years ago, West, the host of “The Adventure Series” on Outdoor Channel, challenged himself to kill one bull from each of the five North American caribou species with just his CVA muzzleloader rifle. But even the avid hunter couldn’t have predicted how his most recent hunt would end. In 2013, he snagged the first of his five caribou: the Alaskan-Yukon Barren Ground. Over the next few years, he followed it up with a Central Canadian Barren Ground, a Mountain Caribou and a Quebec-Labrador, leaving only one species in his crosshairs: the Woodland Caribou of Newfoundland. MINNESOTA ‘BUTCHERS’ CHARGED IN STATES LARGEST TRAPPING BUST West’s search for a Woodland bull took such an incredible turn that he’s dedicating an upcoming episode of “The Adventure Series” to tell the tale. In October, West flew to Newfoundland, Canada, to meet up with Wayne Holloway, an expert hunter and guide at the Pine Ridge Lodge. Together, they began a days-long journey in search of the perfect bull. The two tracked caribou through the some rutting grounds near Clarenville, in the eastern part of the island, but West wasn’t in a rush to snag the first one he saw. “I was going to enjoy every day I was out there,” West told Fox News. “The reality is, I didn’t want (the trip) to end.” After days of in the wildreness, the duo finally spotted an ideal specimen perched on top of a hill. But when West approached and aimed his muzzleloader at the animals vitals, he noticed something was amiss. “My instincts told me that something was wrong,” West recalls on the show. “(The bull) had a broken leg and puncture wounds on his side, from fighting, and he was thin and very old,” he added. “I had two seconds to understand what I was seeing.” Ultimately, West decided to pull the trigger and take the animal down — a move that lined up with his beliefs as a conservationist. “The conversationist in me overcame any other insticts that I had,” West told Fox News. “(The caribou) was done. He was at the end of natural life. In a split second, I said to myself,’ I have to take this caribou.'” “I couldn’t let him run off in that condition,” West added in a press release. GREAT WHITE CIRCLES MAUI FISHERMAN FOR OVER AN HOUR Conservationists in Newfoundland will likely agree. According to wildlife biologist Shane Mahoney, the caribou in Newfoundland...

Read More

New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo Published March 21, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms. According to a Bloomberg report, the number of tourists visiting New Zealand is much higher than what the country predicted just a few years ago. Because of this unforeseen rapid growth, hotels across the country are selling out rooms. The same Bloomberg report featured a story on a group of 53 elderly American tourists who were forced to spend the night in a traditional Maori meeting house when their flight home from Auckland was canceled. All the hotel rooms in the city were fully booked. Last year, 3.5 million people visited New Zealand. By 2022, that number is expected to reach an annual 4.5 million — almost matching the country’s population of 4.7 million people. More from Travel + Leisure 20 Trips to Take in Your Twenties The Best Views in Every State 13 Places Where You Can See the Bluest Water in the World The Best Places to Travel in 2017 The Cheapest Places to Travel for Each Month of the Year As the country’s tourism numbers continue to grow, many are considering alternative forms of accommodation. While some may choose to stay in something like the Maori meeting house (with little more than a mattress on the floor), others turn to Airbnb. Accodring to data from AirDNA, there are 1,401 active Airbnb listings in the capital of Auckland. In Wellington, that number is 1,488. According to an accommodation survey by the New Zealand government, there are 3,089 establishments in total, providing 138,593 places for tourists to stay throughout the country. Hotel occupancy is at about 86 percent throughout the year. Plans have already been laid for the construction of an additional 5,200 hotel rooms throughout the country, but government research still predicts a hotel room shortage of about 4,500 by 2025. Increased tourism numbers are doing more than just selling out hotel rooms, though. New Zealand tourism authorities warn that higher numbers of visitors are contributing to environmental stress, clogging sewerage systems in small towns, and eroding trailways in many of the country’s natural...

Read More

Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock) Think people are all about super luxurious getaways these days? A new study says toasting marshmallows and sleeping under the stars are more popular than ever before. According to a report released by Kampgrounds of America (KOA), a group of privately held campgrounds, more and more Americans are now spending their leisure time camping. KOA data found that 61 percent of survey respondents said they had gone camping in 2014. That’s a jump from 58 percent in 2013. In 2016, KOA estimated that around 37 million households in the country went camping at least once during the year. And almost a third of campers reported going into the woods three or more times in one year. It’s that second group of campers, the group said, that’s helping increase interest in camping overall. Since 2014, the percentage of campers of who say that they take three or more camping trips a year has increased by more than 36 percent. Infrequent campers (those who go just once a year) have simultaneously dropped by 10 percent. In 2017 half of all campers surveyed said that they’re planning to spend even more time camping this year. More than half of millennials surveyed (51 percent) said that they planned to go camping more often in 2017. Millennials also mark the age range to most enjoy the activity in large groups–10 or more travelers. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS But neither millennials – nor campers in general – are completely cutting the cord. According to the study, 95 percent of people who go camping bring some sort of technology with them while 37 percent of campers said that some sort of tech was actually required for their trip in order to spend more time outdoors. About half of survey respondents indicated that least free Wi-Fi was a big factor when deciding where to stay. And when it comes to sleeping, conventional tents were the most popular, according to the study. But the number of campers electing to use RVs or cabins is also...

Read More

World’s most powerful passports ranked in study

World’s most powerful passports ranked in study

Published March 17, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) The United States passport is more powerful today than it was a year ago, according to the results of a new study. The 2017 Visa Restriction Index released by Henley and Partners has determined that the U.S. passport ranks just behind Germany’s and Sweden’s in terms of traveling power — with Germany’s and Sweden’s allowing for travel to 176 and 175 countries, respectively, and the U.S. allowing for travel to 174. A year ago, the same index ranked the U.S. passport as the world’s fourth most powerful. America’s passport now shares its third-place ranking alongside those from Denmark, Finland, Italy and Spain, all of which allow for entry to 174 countries in total. PUTIN GIVES RUSSIAN PASSPORT TO US ACTOR STEVEN SEGAL The VRI arrives at a passport’s score based on the number of countries and territories its citizens are permitted to enter visa-free. Henley and Partners counts 219 countries and territories in total, with 218 being a perfect VRI score, reports MarketWatch. (A citizen needs no passport within their own country.) However, Christian H. Kälin, group chairman of Henley and Partners, says he expects subsequent rankings to change more dramatically than they have in the past, based on recent events. “We have witnessed several major events recently that are likely to have an impact on global mobility — including Brexit and the election of U.S. President Donald Trump. Both can be interpreted as steps toward restricting movement and creating barriers to entry,” said Kälin in a statement. “Generally, visa requirements are a reflection of a country’s relationship with others, and take into account diplomatic relationships between countries, reciprocal visa arrangements, security risks, and the dangers of visa and immigration regulation violations,” he added. Meanwhile, the countries whose passports currently have the least traveling power include Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria and Somalia — all of which have ranked among the bottom five in VRI’s rankings since its 2015 index. VRI’s top 10 countries with the most powerful passports are listed below: Rank Country Score 1 Germany 176 2 Sweden 175 3 Denmark 174   Finland 174   Italy 174   Spain 174   U.S. 174 4 Austria 173   Belgium 173   France 173   Luxembourg 173   Netherlands 173   Norway 173   Singapore 173   U.K. 173 5 Ireland (Republic of) 172   Japan 172   New Zealand 172 6 Croatia 171   Greece 171   Portugal 171   Switzerland 171 7 Australia 170   Korea (Republic of, South) 170 8 Iceland 169 9 Czech Republic 168 10 Hungary 167 The full rankings can be found at Henley and Partners’ website. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR...

Read More

Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

By David E. Petzal Published March 17, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Sweetfire matches  (Field & Stream/UCO Gear) Survival, at the 2017 Shot Show, was very, very big. Why you’d want to survive was never spelled out, but there was no shortage of stuff designed to get you through the Wrath to Come. The problem is that very often, the Wrath to Come does not take the form of a nuclear exchange with North Korea, or currency collapse, or meteor strike, or any of the really dramatic stuff. Sometimes it takes the most mundane forms. In Newfield, Maine, on February 3, a 34-year-old named John Sciaba, described as an experienced outdoorsman, was seen in the woods behind his house where he liked to camp overnight. He was not seen again. Shortly after the search for him began, a series of six heavy snowstorms set in, making it impossible for tracking dogs to track or for drones to go up in the air. When the snow finally stops, any traces of him will have been obliterated. It does not look good. RELATED: THE ELEMENTS OF A PERFECT FIRE This brings us to fire. Very often, if you can start a fire, it will save you. Not only will you not freeze to death, but a fire can be seen for miles at night, and a deliberately smoky fire can get up through the tree canopy that a drone can’t see through. Making a fire is much more difficult than you imagine, unless you’ve tried doing it. Watching “The Revenant,” I get a kick out Leo DiCaprio body-surfing 5 miles down a freezing Class 3 rapids, washing up on shore, giving a very small tinder ball a few whacks with the old flint and steel, and instantly creating a roaring blaze by which he can meditate on his chances for an Oscar. Granted, in real life, trappers and Native Americans were very good at starting fires*, but even so… A more typical example is available at a club I belong to, which tests the skills of its members in a series of wilderness-skills events, one of which is called the Water Boil. You’re given a chunk of pine log, a pot with a quart of water, a hatchet that is purposely kept dull**, three strike-anywhere matches, a small stone on which to strike the matches, and 11 minutes*** in which to build a fire and bring the water to a rolling boil. You’re usually surrounded by club members who offer their opinions on your manual dexterity, chances of succeeding, technique, and manhood in general. If you screw up in any phase, you flunk, amidst the joyful hoots, jeers and catcalls...

Read More