Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Asides

Plants you can eat to survive in the wild

Plants you can eat to survive in the wild

By Serusha Govender Published June 03, 2014 Facebook102 Twitter212 Gplus0 Flickr/Nomadic Lass Next Ever watched those shows where ordinary people are unexpectedly stranded in the wild and have to survive by their bare wits and by living off nature? Notice how some poor guy always runs into trouble when he eats a plant he thinks is safe but is actually highly poisonous? Clearly his survival instinct weren’t up to scratch. Think you could do a better job? No matter where you are in the world knowing what plants are edible and which ones could kill you is a critical survival skill. You never know when you may be stranded in the woods, washed up on a deserted island, or even have to fend for yourself when the zombie apocalypse strikes (hey, it could happen). There are some important facts about plants to know which end up keeping you alive by swallowing a few bitter stalks: like knowing the difference between plants that look good but are actually poisonous, which plants that look and smell awful but are really delicious and nutritious, and what plants smell bad, and taste worse, but may really have enough nutrients to keep you going. Unless you’ve spent time picking up nifty survival tricks in the army, or were a Boy Scout (or Girl Scout), chances are you probably don’t know some of the tricks to finding edible plants. The first things to know are the warning signs that a plant is poisonous: plants with leaves that grow in a pattern of threes, seed or bulbs that are found inside pods, a bitter or soapy taste, sap that is milky or strangely discolored, grain head that have spikes, hooks, or spurs, and a kind of bitter “almond” smell to the leaves or bark. These are all signs that you shouldn’t be eating it. You can also apply the Universal Edibility Test to the sprout you’re considering consuming. You can also keep your eyes peeled for these useful plants which are definitely edible and should be sure to help you survive in the wild. 1. Amaranth Flickr/Nomadic Lass Amaranth is a weed that looks a lot like pigweed, and is a tall, upright, broad-leafed plant that grows all-year round. It comes in all sizes, shapes, and colors. The leaves can be round or lance-shaped, measure from five to fifteen centimeters long, and have a light green, dark green, reddish, or variegated color. The seeds are usually white, yellow, pink or black and the flowers can be huge tassels or tiny globes, with a red, pink, yellow or cream color. Amaranth is kind of leafy vegetable and grain that’s actually been eaten for centuries all over the world. Amaranth seeds have...

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7 things not to do at a campground

7 things not to do at a campground

By Dave Seminara Published August 15, 2013 FoxNews.com I love to camp with my wife and two little boys, ages 3 and 5. I’d say that 75-80 percent of the campers we’ve encountered over the years have been good people who understand the need to be considerate while sleeping with fellow travelers in the great outdoors. But it only takes one dud to ruin your camping experience. A bad camping trip can make the pleasures of home seem awfully enticing.  A great one can remind you of how magical camping can be–given the right circumstances and neighbors. I prefer to camp at state and national parks because the tent sites tend to be cheaper and more spacious than private campgrounds, where you can sometimes feel like you are stacked on top of your fellow campers. But if you don’t plan far ahead, getting a coveted site at a state or national park on a summer weekend can be extremely difficult. No matter where you pop your tent, here are seven things not to do a campground. 1Check-in late at night iStock What’s it like to be near someone who decides to check in late at night? Last summer, on a rainy night at a state park in Vermont, we heard noises very close to our tent after midnight.  We were alarmed because it was a Monday night and the place had totally cleared out after the weekend, with just one family left in our vicinity. Our paranoia grew when a bright, blinding light illuminated our tent. When we had checked in, a park ranger had mentioned that there had been some bear sightings and we feared that the rangers were tracking a bear near our campsite. Eventually, we fell asleep without further incident. The next morning, we found out that the noises we heard were late arriving campers who used their high beams, pointed right into our tent, as they set up their tent in the rain. Some campgrounds police arrival times, but many don’t. There is no graceful way to set up camp in the middle of the night, so please, just don’t do it. 2Get drunk iStock For every one person who becomes quiet and introspective when intoxicated, there are a dozen who get loud and obnoxious. If you stay reasonably coherent, you’ll be less likely to annoy your neighbors. 3Bring a yappy dog iStock No one thinks that their dog is annoying, but we all know that some pets are better off left home. The only thing worse than a camper who stands by idly as their dog barks at passersby, squirrels or for no reason at all, is one who leaves their dog or dogs chained...

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Maine hikers drive to ocean deaths after being rescued

Maine hikers drive to ocean deaths after being rescued

Published July 25, 2013 FoxNews.com July 23, 2013: Rescue diver Travis Preston, a Jonesboro, Maine firefighter, hooks up a minivan in the water on the boat ramp at the scene of the double fatal accident in Roque Bluffs, Maine. A pregnant Maine woman and her friend visiting from Pennsylvania who had been rescued after getting lost hiking died when they accidentally drove their minivan off a boat ramp and into the ocean, authorities said. Amy Stiner, 37, of Machias, and Melissa Moyer, 38, of Sunbury, Pa., presumably drowned when Stiner drove her car down the boat ramp at the end of a dead-end road at about 9 p.m. Tuesday in this town of 300 people in eastern Maine, said Washington County Sheriff Donnie Smith. Smith called the deaths a tragic accident made worse because Stiner was five months pregnant. The two were found in the back of the minivan likely due to the fact it sank from the front, The Bangor Daily News reported. A dog was also found dead inside the minivan. “They called on the phone that they were in the water and the car was filling up. Then the phone went dead,” Smith said. “An hour later, the deputies found the car.” Earlier in the evening, the women got lost while hiking in Roque Bluffs State Park amid fog and a steady downpour, the Portland Press Herald reported. An off-duty firefighter found them and their dog and gave them rides on his ATV back to his house, where a warden picked them up and brought them to the 2001 Dodge Caravan. Stiner then drove toward the boat ramp instead of in the other direction to Machias, Smith said. Weather could have contributed to the accident, Smith said. “It appears they went the wrong direction and drove off the ramp,” he said. “If you don’t know the area, in the fog and rain it wouldn’t be a difficult thing to do.” Authorities found the submerged car about 175 feet off the boat ramp, the women and the dog inside with the doors closed and the windows up. The Portland Press Herald reported that the women were able to call 911 as the car was entering the water. “They said they were in the water and the car was filling with the water. And then the phone just went dead,” Washington County Sheriff Donnie Smith told the newspaper. Smith said blood tests will be conducted on the bodies but he did not suspect alcohol or drugs contributed to the fatal accident. Gregg Stiner, Amy’s husband, told the Bangor Daily News that the two are organic farmers. He did not comment any further in the interview. The Associated Press...

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Sportsman Channel TV host killed in Montana murder-suicide

Published March 10, 2013 Associated Press TV personality Gregory Rodriguez, left, who was shot and killed by Wayne Bengston, right. (AP/Whitefish Police Department) The Sportsman Channel says it’s deeply saddened by the shooting death in northwestern Montana of one of its TV hosts who traveled the world in search of big game and shared his adventures on his program “A Rifleman’s Journal.” The company in a statement early Saturday said it will miss Gregory G. Rodriguez’s “thoughtfulness, candor and dedication to encourage a safe and enjoyable outdoor experience for all.” Police said Rodriguez, 43, of Sugar Land, Texas, died Thursday in the town of Whitefish when he was shot by another man in an apparent jealous rage while the TV personality visited the shooter’s wife. An outpouring on social media has followed the death of Rodriguez, who combined his comfort in front of the camera and travels to exotic locations with his hunting and shooting expertise into a popular program. The Sportsman Channel said that in January “A Rifleman’s Journal” won “Best Instructional/Educational Program” at the Sportsman Channel’s Sportsman Choice Awards. “We’re all in a state of shock and disbelief right now,” said David Kelly, a spokesman for the Houston Safari Club, of which Rodriguez was a member. Rodriguez is survived by his wife, Lisa, and two children. In a statement issued Saturday, the family said he was in Montana on a business trip. “Greg was a wonderful husband, father, son, brother and friend,” the statement said. “We love him and will miss him dearly. Please respect the family in their time of mourning and allow them to grieve in peace.” Whitefish Police Chief Bill Dial said that 41-year-old Wayne Bengston shot Rodriguez at about 10:30 p.m. at the home of his wife’s mother. Dial said Bengston then beat his wife, took his 2-year-old son to a relative’s house and drove to his home about 25 miles away in West Glacier, where he killed himself. Dial said Bengston’s wife was treated at a hospital and released that night. Dial said that Rodriguez and the woman, who works for a firearms manufacturer in the Flathead Valley, met at a trade show and struck up a casual relationship that police do not believe was romantic. Rodriguez was the founder and CEO of Global Adventure Outfitters. That company declined to comment. According to the company’s website, Rodriguez was a mortgage banker before a trip to Africa led him to alter course in the 1990s and start pursuing hunting for a living. He eventually traveled to 21 countries on six continents on that quest, the company said. Read...

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