The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

Fox News

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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Camping

How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire

How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire

By Tim MacWelch Published June 01, 2017 A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch) Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built fireplaces in their log cabins — and more remote forebears burned fires in whatever structure they called home. 3 ODD TECHNIQUES FOR PRIMITIVE FISHING And since it’s not wise to have a fire in a primitive hut made of sticks and dry vegetation (or a cave, for that matter), it’s good to know of other ways to heat your living and sleeping area. By digging a hot rock heating pit in the dirt floor of a shelter, you can enjoy the heat of a fire – with far less danger to yourself and your shelter. Here’s how. Start by digging a small pit in the floor of your shelter, a little bigger than the bowling ball-sized rock that you will be using to transfer heat. Dig the hole to match the rock’s size and shape, and find a flat rock to cover the pit. Make sure that you get your two rocks from a dry location (water-logged rocks tend to explode when heated, so do not use rocks pulled from rivers, streams, and ponds). Ensure that everything fits together well before you heat up the stone, since a 1200-degree-F rock isn’t a fun thing to juggle. You could even recess the hole of the pit surrounding the cover, so the flat rock sits flush with the dirt floor (not a trip hazard). SURVIVAL SKILL: CATCH YOUR OWN BAIT When it’s time to use your set-up, heat up your pit stone in a fire for about an hour (but don’t heat the lid stone). Carry the stone to the pit (a shovel works well), and drop it in. Seal the pit with your flat stone lid, and bask in the radiant heat that will last for several hours. 5 CLUES FOR TRACKING WILD ANIMALS (WITHOUT TRACKS) For sustained heat, you could always have another rock of a similar shape and size to your first rock at the ready, so that when the first rock is done cooling off, the second rock can be swapped in its place to keep the heat going. This trick works best in very dry soil and with a red-hot rock. Just clear all flammables out of the way as you move the near-molten stone toward the waiting pit! 5 EARLY-SUMMER TREES THAT ARE MOST USEFUL FOR...

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Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock) Think people are all about super luxurious getaways these days? A new study says toasting marshmallows and sleeping under the stars are more popular than ever before. According to a report released by Kampgrounds of America (KOA), a group of privately held campgrounds, more and more Americans are now spending their leisure time camping. KOA data found that 61 percent of survey respondents said they had gone camping in 2014. That’s a jump from 58 percent in 2013. In 2016, KOA estimated that around 37 million households in the country went camping at least once during the year. And almost a third of campers reported going into the woods three or more times in one year. It’s that second group of campers, the group said, that’s helping increase interest in camping overall. Since 2014, the percentage of campers of who say that they take three or more camping trips a year has increased by more than 36 percent. Infrequent campers (those who go just once a year) have simultaneously dropped by 10 percent. In 2017 half of all campers surveyed said that they’re planning to spend even more time camping this year. More than half of millennials surveyed (51 percent) said that they planned to go camping more often in 2017. Millennials also mark the age range to most enjoy the activity in large groups–10 or more travelers. FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS But neither millennials – nor campers in general – are completely cutting the cord. According to the study, 95 percent of people who go camping bring some sort of technology with them while 37 percent of campers said that some sort of tech was actually required for their trip in order to spend more time outdoors. About half of survey respondents indicated that least free Wi-Fi was a big factor when deciding where to stay. And when it comes to sleeping, conventional tents were the most popular, according to the study. But the number of campers electing to use RVs or cabins is also...

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