Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Exotic Destinations

Terrifying zipline takes you over live crocodiles

Terrifying zipline takes you over live crocodiles

Published March 08, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook535 Twitter0 livefyre3 Email Print Soar over gators and crocs on Crocodile Crossing. (St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park) Looking to take a real walk on the wild side? If the average zoo isn’t thrilling enough, St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park in eastern Florida boasts a heart-pumping attraction that allows nature lovers to get up close and personal with real wild reptiles—alligators, crocodiles, and gharials (fish-eating crocs), oh my! Related Image Expand / Contract Don’t look down. (St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park) Crocodile Crossing is a zipline attraction that spans 11 different lines over seven acres allowing visitors a unique way to take in the park’s exotic species. In addition to viewing tropical birds and lemurs at eye level—the ropes are nearly 60 feet high—adventurers glide right over numerous pits teeming with live crocodiles and alligators. Though the zipline is a relatively new draw to the park, the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park has been showcasing Florida’s reptiles and wildlife to the public since opening in 1893. Today guests can view living specimens of all 24 currently recognized species of crocodiles—the only facility in the world to house them all. The park is home to dozens of other species and visitors can take in educational show or learn more about global conservation efforts. Related Image Expand / Contract Clocking in at 1,250 pounds and stretching over 15 feet, Maximo, a saltwater crocodile, is the park’s largest animal. (St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park) But there’s little doubt that Crocodile Crossing is the park’s most unique—and sometimes scary—exhibit, according to previous visitors. Attempting all 11 lines over the full Crocodile Crossing will set you back $67 but if you don’t want to spend too much time hovering above snapping alligator jaws, the park offers a 5-line route for $37. Check out more thrilling activities to do in St....

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Instagram-worthy spots that will kill you

Instagram-worthy spots that will kill you

By Brittany Jones Cooper Published October 15, 2015 Facebook251 Twitter15 Email Print This boulder is wedged in place…for now. (iStock) If you see a cliff, chances are there is an adrenaline junkie willing to push the limits and walk to the edge. And thanks to the popularity of Instagram, even more people are putting themselves in dangerous situations just to snap the perfect photo. It seems we can’t go more than a few days without reading about a death-by-selfie. In fact, just last week a Russian teen fell to his death after posing for a photo while dangling from a roof. The teen, Andrey R, had previously taken similar pictures on roofs, which he shared on social media. There are a handful of breathtaking locations around the world that attract daredevils in search of the perfect photo. If all goes as planned, the photo has the potential to go viral. But if the photographer moves just an inch in the wrong direction, the photo could be their final act. 1. Trolltunga Trolltunga, which translates to “trolls tongue,” juts out nearly 2,300 feet above lake Ringedalsvatnet in Norway. This rock formation is THE place to take the ultimate selfie, and thousands hike to its edge every year. While many successfully snap their photos, on Sept. 5, 2015, an Australian woman fell to her death while standing on the edge of the rock.   2. Kjeragbolten Norway is also the site of Kjeragbolten, a boulder wedged in between a mountain crevasse. Long lines form every day, filled with people hoping to snap a photo on top of the dubious rock. It appears as if the rock isn’t going anywhere, but part of the thrill is that we just don’t know when that rock will wiggle itself free.   3. Half Dome Yosemite National Park is known for its impressive geology, and the star of the park is the gigantic Half Dome. This granite crest rises 4,737 ft above the valley floor and is a popular spot for hikers around the world. Once they reach the summit, many opt for a photo on what is called “The Visor.” With no rails and frequent rock movement, obtaining this photo is not only dangerous…it’s downright crazy. Another hotspot to take an Instagram-worthy photos at Half Dome is called the “diving board.”   4. Cliffs of Moher The Cliffs of Moher are Ireland’s most popular natural tourist attraction and stand at 702 feet at their highest point. But in addition to their awe-inspiring beauty, the area is also known to have frequent rock falls. The cliffs are under constant watch by experts, and are deemed safe as long as tourists stay on the trail.  But as...

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Hot air ballooning and cave dwelling in Cappadocia, Turkey

Hot air ballooning and cave dwelling in Cappadocia, Turkey

By Nadine Jolie Courtney Published October 08, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook111 Twitter164 livefyre3 Email Print The stunning Fairy chimneys. (Erik Courtney) Smack in the center of Turkey, only a 90-minute flight from Istanbul, lies a natural wonder: a remote mountainous region with Fairy chimneys – tall, spindly volcanic rock formations that stretch toward the sky – and thousands of ancient caves carved into the soft rocks of the wide moonscape valley. Welcome to Cappadocia, Turkey. What to Do The landscape is spectacular and the cave-dwelling – yes, visitors can sleep in cave hotels – is very cool, but Cappadocia may be best known for having one of the largest hot air ballooning industries in the world. Every morning hundreds of tourists gather before dawn at the more than 20 hot air ballooning companies around town, huddling over cups of coffee and yawning into their jackets as they wait for the tour buses to take them to the launch sites. Waking up at 3:30 a.m. for a 4 a.m. pickup isn’t easy, but all is forgiven once the balloons go skyward. Related Image Expand / Contract Waking up at the crack of dawn is exhausting, but worth it for views of the Cappadocia region like this. (Erik Courtney) The best hot air ballooning exists where there are majestic views – think Australian wine country, the Swiss Alps or the Serengeti plains – and Cappadocia’s rugged landscape doesn’t disappoint. Flights last between 30 minutes and 90 minutes, depending on the company and package you choose, with hour-long flights the most popular. My husband and I flew with Royal Balloon (the company Martha Stewart chose when she visited the area), and we chose the Royal Package, which includes pickup at your hotel, a breakfast buffet, a 90-minute balloon ride, and a champagne-and-strawberries toast upon landing. Now is the perfect time to go: October is the sweet spot between the oppressive heat of summer and the numbing cold of winter. There’s one more plus to waking up hours before the sun comes up. After your balloon adventure you have the entire day left to explore. Cappadocia, home to a UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Göreme Open-Air Museum, is truly a can’t-miss location. Unlike in America, where treasures are often hidden behind ropes or glass, tourists here can enjoy the experience of climbing up into the caves and trekking through “is-this-actually-legal?” areas that would definitely be off-limits in the U.S. Related Image Expand / Contract Cave dwellings offer amazing views and also a place to sleep. (Erik Courtney) Another must-see is the Underground Cities, a network of subterranean cities built during the Byzantine era to shelter as many as 20,000 Christians from Roman and Muslim invaders. The...

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Crack forms in China’s terrifying glass suspension bridge

Crack forms in China’s terrifying glass suspension bridge

Published October 07, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook404 Twitter13 livefyre5 Email Print File photo – A tourist looks down as she walks on a glass suspension bridge at the Shiniuzhai National Geo-park in Pinging county, Hunan province, China, Sept. 24, 2015. (REUTERS/Stringer) A bridge in China made entirely of glass was an engineering marvel – until it cracked. The Yuntaishan glass bridge in Central China’s Shiniuizhai National Geological Park had become quite the tourist draw when it opened Sept. 20. Aptly named the Haohan Qiao Bridge or Brave Men’s Bridge in English, holidaymakers rushed to cross the 980-foot-long span that sits between two cliffs and rises 600 feet above a canyon. But on Oct. 5, something went terribly wrong. Tourists, reporting on Chinese social media, said they heard a crack and everyone rushed to get off the bridge. Related Image Expand / Contract Visitors walk across a glass-bottomed suspension bridge as seen from the air in a scenic zone in Pingjiang county in southern China’s Hunan province Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. The bridge, 300 meters (984 feet) long and 180 meters (590 feet) above the valley floor, opened to visitors on Thursday for the first time since its conversion from a regular suspension bridge was completed. (Chinatopix Via AP) CHINA OUT (Chinatopix Via AP) “I heard a bang from under…Everybody is screaming. I cried, ‘It’s really cracked! It’s really cracked!’ And pushed the people in front of me to get away,” according to an unidentified tourist, who was quoted in the English language Chinese Daily. Related: New glass suspension bridge in China is 980 feet long, 600 feet high, and absolutely terrifying Staff at the Yuntaishan resort confirmed that the bridge had developed a crack – blamed they said on someone dropping a thermos onto the path – and had been shut down for the time being, according to the newspaper. Tourists were evacuated from the scene soon after the incident and it was unclear if anyone was hurt. The crack calls into questions a bridge that designers insisted was safe when it was opened.  To dispel concerns about a possible accident, designers played up the fact that the glass was three-quarters of an inch thick – 25 times stronger than ordinary glass – and was treated to be extremely resistant to both bending and shattering. The glass itself is encapsulated by a steel frame. “The steel frame used to support and encase the glass bridge is also very strong and densely built, so even if a glass is broken, travelers won’t fall through,” a worker recently told the China News Service. I guess they didn’t think of someone dropping a thermos on the bridge.   Originally available...

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America’s most dangerous destinations

America’s most dangerous destinations

By Robert Firpo-Cappiello Published June 29, 2015 Budget Travel Facebook106 Twitter194 Email Print iStock Next Don’t get us wrong: You should most definitely visit each and every one of these one-of-a-kind vacation spots. But be aware that your risk of being bitten by a shark, swept out to sea, mauled by a bear, or blown off a winding ridge trail are just a bit higher here than back home. Check out some of America’s most dangerous travel spots and use a little extra caution when planning a trip. 1. Canyonlands National Park, Utah iStock This deceptively beautiful park is where Aron Ralston famously amputated his own right arm when it got pinned under a boulder. Ralston, the subject of the James Franco film 127 Hours, had the right idea: Searches and rescues in this remote desert region—where visitors routinely fall off ledges or are overcome by heat and dehydration—can take days.   2. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park iStock This park on the Big Island, is home to Kilauea, which still spews hot ash and lava into the sea. Follow the advice of rangers and signage and you’ll get a scary-but-safe peek at this hothead in action. 3. Volusia County, Florida iStock This county has more recorded shark attacks than anywhere else on earth. Yep. Sounds crazy, no? But this stretch of beach is shark central. The good news: If you do get bitten here, it almost certainly won’t be fatal—no previous shark attack here has ever killed a swimmer. 4. Maroon Bells, Colorado iStock These peaks in the beautiful Elk Mountains, have earned the nickname the “deadly bells,” but even expert climbers are slow to perceive the danger here. Deceptively easy climbing can lead people into tight spots and weak rocks that break away unexpectedly. 5. Denali National Park, Alaska iStock isten up: If you keep your distance from the grizzlies, you’ll be fine! But this place is crawling with massive bears and you’ve got to keep your food packed up, never hike alone, and stay away from the mama bears and cubs. A fatal mauling in recent years got lots of press because the victim photographed the bear that attacked him. Don’t do that. 6. Yosemite National Park, California iStock There are plenty of super-safe tour experiences here but also plenty of super-risky adventures. Iconic Half Dome is a popular, and relatively easy, climb—but unfortunately that has led to crowding, carelessness, and visitors falling to their deaths. 7. Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado iStock Like Yosemite, it’s perfectly safe to visit this beautiful park, but those who venture up Long’s Peak—with its narrow paths, rock slides, and risk of lightning strikes—risk becoming the annual visitor (on average) who does not descend alive. Check out more...

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8 stunning natural bridges around the world

8 stunning natural bridges around the world

By Lyn Mettler Published May 26, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook28 Twitter130 livefyre1 Email Print Natural Bridges National Monument Next Thousands or even millions of years old, natural bridges are awe-inspiring sights that draw thousands of visitors every year. Also called natural arches, they are essentially holes in rock, and they are among Mother Nature’s greatest creations: sandstone or limestone formations that are the result of erosion or the collapse of cavern roofs. While you can travel around the world to see some amazing natural bridges, some may even be in your backyard. Here are some of the most majestic natural bridges across the globe: 1. Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah Natural Bridges National Monument You’ll find not just one natural bridge, but three, at the Natural Bridges National Monument, and they date as far back as 5,000 years. Named “Kachina,” “Owachomo” and “Sipapu” in honor of the Native Americans who once lived there, these bridges in the desert of the Colorado Plateau were declared a national monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908. The bridges were formed over millions of years by erosion from running water on the sedimentary rock, which 260 million years ago was the site of a beach. When originally formed, each bridge was thick and massive, like Kachina Bridge, but as they erode, they become more delicate, like Owachomo, and eventually collapse. So you may want to see it now, before it’s gone! 2. Green Bridge of Wales, Great Britain © Crown copyright (2014) Visit Wales One of the most recognized landmarks in Wales, the Green Bridge sits on the Pembrokeshire Coast near Castlemartin. A limestone arch formed by erosion from seawater and waves, the bridge was once a solid piece of rock. Two caves likely formed on either side, eventually wearing away and creating a hole through the rock. This arch, too, will eventually collapse due to erosion. You view the arch from above via a coastal path or take a guided kayak tour and paddle through it. Wales also has another arch, the Church Doors Sea Arch at Shrinkle Haven, though it’s not as impressive as the Green Bridge. 3. Pravčická Brána, Czech Republic Czech Tourism The Czech Republic is home to the biggest natural rock arch in all of Europe: the Pravčická brána, or Pravčice Sandstone Gate, in Bohemian Switzerland National Park. While you can’t walk on top of it due to its narrowing and thinness, you can stand underneath to get a sense of its grandeur. Standing almost seven stories tall, the bridge, which is made of sandstone that has been carved over millennia, is best viewed from several nearby vantage points accessible by hiking trails. This impressive formation inspired Hans Christian Andersen, who wrote...

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