Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Exotic Destinations

Coolest caves in the world

Coolest caves in the world

By Diana Gerstacker Published April 28, 2015 Facebook31 Twitter57 Email Print iStock Next When you take a look at the world on a map, it seems there isn’t much left to discover. There are, of course, the depths of the ocean that are still largely unexplored and perhaps some parts of the poles haven’t yet been seen by human eyes, but other than that it seems that we’ve found almost everything else—until you consider the caves. These structures are incredible feats of nature and man and many of them are still being discovered today. No one found the Cave of Crystals until 2000 and no one has been able to explore the whole interior due to its extreme heat and humidity. Better yet, the largest cave system in the entire world was just discovered in 2009—and there could be an even larger cave out there, no one knows for sure. These incredible earthly features are being unveiled and explored all the time. Though you may not be able to visit and get inside some of these caves, they are definitely worth a look. From Patagonia to China, these natural and man-made caves are unbelievable. Check out some of the coolest caves in the world. 1. Marble Caves—Patagonia, Chile iStock Out in in the turquoise waters of General Carrera Lake sits 5,000 million tons of marble, elegantly shaped by nature into caves. Viewing the caves in person is a far more beautiful experience than looking at any photo, but getting there is more difficult than you can imagine. After a series of flights into the city of Coyhaique, you’ll need to drive another 200 miles and then board a boat, which will get you to the caves. 2. Skaftafell Ice Caves—Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland Stock Set in the Vatnajökull National Park in southern Iceland, the magnificent ice caves attract travelers from all over. The caves are made of highly pressurized glacier ice and they are an incredible sight. Visit sooner rather than later, who knows when these structures could be gone. 3. Man-Made Caves—Dolomites, Italy iStock The stunningly beautiful man-made caves that sit high among the Dolomites are the result of a dark, tragic time. The area was the front line between Italy and Austria during World War I and as a result these caves still exist in the mountains and bullet holes still line many of the trees below. 4. Reed Flute Cave—Guangxi, China iStock The cave that got its name from the type of reed growing outside is a major tourist attraction in the Guangxi province of China. Lit from within by multi-colored lights, being inside the cave is a mind-bending experience—one you shouldn’t miss. 5. Son Doong Cave—Phong Nha-Kẻ Bàng National Park,...

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Tiny oasis town flourishes in Peruvian desert

Tiny oasis town flourishes in Peruvian desert

No, this is not a mirage. It’s the tiny desert town of Huacachina, located in southwestern Peru. With less than 100 residents, this small village manages to thrive in this extremely arid climate that gets its water supply from a tiny lagoon. With less than 100 residents, this small village manages to thrive in this extremely arid climate that gets its water supply from a tiny lagoon. In 2013, it was reported that the town’s lagoon waters had reached record low levels so if you want to really get away from it all, plan your trip to Huacachina...

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Documentary: Michael Rockefeller was eaten by cannibals

Documentary: Michael Rockefeller was eaten by cannibals

Published December 23, 2014 New York Post Facebook62 Twitter142 Email Print The public will finally get to see “The Search for Michael Rockefeller” Feb. 1 when Netflix releases the documentary on one of the most compelling unsolved mysteries of the 20th Century. The film confirms what The New York Post reported in 1968 — cannibals devoured the son of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller. In 2007, filmmaker Fraser C. Heston (son of Charlton) discovered a lost cache of 16 mm film shot by Milt Machlin, the editor of Argosy magazine who coined the phrases “Bermuda Triangle” and “the Abominable Snowman.” The footage was taken during Machlin’s expedition to the New Guinea in 1969 in search of the lost scion, inspired by an eyewitness report that Michael Rockefeller was alive and being held against his will by stone-age...

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Australia’s Pink Lake and other oddly colored bodies of water

Australia’s Pink Lake and other oddly colored bodies of water

All Canada Photos / Alamy Next From salt lakes in Africa to volcano pools in Indonesia, these stunning bodies of water feature every color of the rainbow. 1. Peyto Lake – Alberta, Canada All Canada Photos / Alamy Picture-perfect Peyto Lake in Banff National Park gets its color from rock flour that fill its waters. These tiny bits of glacial sediment turn the lake an almost unreal-looking shade of turquoise. 2. Hells of Beppu – Beppu, Ōita, Japan christian kober / Alamy The hot springs at Beppu, referred to colloquially as the Hells of Beppu, are located on Japan’s Kyushu Island. The eight springs range in color from turquoise to rust. Chinoike Jigoku (Bloody Hell Pond) is a must-see—it boils blood red, as its name would suggest. 3. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge – Fremont, California Aerial Archives / Alamy This U.S. National Wildlife Refuge on the southern end of the San Francisco Bay offers plenty of sights on foot, but to see its most impressive feature, you’ll have to go up in the air. The Cargill-managed salt evaporation ponds located within this 30,000-acre park can take on just about any color of the rainbow depending on their salinity levels and which microorganisms are thriving in them at the time of viewing. 4. Emerald Lakes – North Island, New Zealand Hemis / Alamy Tongariro National Park on New Zealand’s North Island has earned two UNESCO World Heritage designations and is also the oldest national park in the country. Within the park lies the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, a 12-mile hiking route that takes you past the Emerald Lakes of Mt. Tongariro. The gorgeous green lakes get their color from the dissolved volcanic minerals in the water. 5. Laguna Colorada – Potosí, Bolivia David Noton Photography / Alamy Bolivia’s Laguna Colorada, which translates to “Red Lagoon”, is a shallow salt lake that contains brackish water the color of rust. The lake is located within the Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve, which is also home to the equally colorful Laguna Verde (“Green Lake”). 6. Grand Prismatic Spring – Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Frans Lanting Studio / Alamy The largest hot spring in the United States also happens to be one of the most colorful bodies of water in the world. The Grand Prismatic Spring’s colorful water is a rainbow of coloration caused by pigmented bacteria and can range from red to blue. 7. Lake Hillier – Middle Island, Australia Wildlight Photo Agency / Alamy The pinkness of Australia’s Lake Hillier remains a bit of a mystery, although theories about its cause are plenty (most scientists blame the bacteria living there). One thing is undeniable: This high-salinity lake is as bright pink as bubble gum. Located on...

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