The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

Fox News

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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Exotic Locations

7 urban adventures for serious thrill-seekers

7 urban adventures for serious thrill-seekers

By Erin Gifford Published October 31, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter Email Print  (CN Tower) There’s adventure travel and then there’s travel just for adrenaline junkies who think they’ve seen and done it all. Fly a plane above the Vegas Strip while doing aerobatic loops. Or drive a race car at triple-digit speeds around the iconic Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval. You can even walk hands-free along the ledge of Toronto’s CN Tower. Fight your fears and get ready for once-in-a-lifetime, heart-racing experiences. You only live once, right? 1. Go Skydiving in Dubai SkyDive Dubai There are plenty of ways to enjoy Dubai’s dramatic skyline, but jumping out of a plane at 13,000 feet, then going into a 120 mph freefall before popping open your parachute may be the most adrenaline-inducing. Open your eyes for incredible views of Palm Jumeirah Island and the skyscraper-filled oasis. Your heart won’t stop racing until well after you’re back on the ground. Prices start at $545 for a tandem dive at SkyDive Dubai. 2. Walk Along the Ledge of the CN Tower in Toronto CN Tower It’s one thing to take the elevator to the top of the CN Tower, but it’s another beast to walk along the ledge– 1,200 feet above the ground. Not for the faint of heart, this literal skywalk will push your fear factor limit as you move around, hands-free. Look out for stunning views of the city skyline, as well as the Toronto Islands and the shoreline of Lake Ontario. Prices start at $195 for one EdgeWalk at the CN Tower. 3. Fly Aerobatics in Las Vegas Sky Combat Ace High above the Las Vegas Strip, you’ll do loops, dives, spins and barrel rolls. You plan the routine, you fly the plane. Just in case, guests are guided by an expert aerobatic pilot who sits in the back. Perfect for Maverick-wannabes. If that’s not thrilling enough, try your hand at aerial combat. Prices start at $599 per person for the you-fly-the-plane Top Gun package with Sky Combat Ace. 4. Ride an Outdoor Glass Slide in Los Angeles OUE Skyspace LA At 1,000 feet above downtown Los Angeles, just 1-and-a-quarter inches of glass keeps you from plummeting 70 floors at the U.S. Bank Tower. But don’t let that scare you. Enjoy the intense rush, as well as the incredible city views, as you glide along the newly installed 45-foot outdoor glass Skyslide. Prices start at $33 per adult, $27 per child for a trip down the Skyslide and access to the observation decks. 5. Scamper Across Rooftops in Stockholm Takvandring There are guided city tours and then there are guided tours where you walk along catwalks, climb ladders and scamper across...

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Weird natural wonders you won’t believe are real

Weird natural wonders you won’t believe are real

Published January 25, 2016 Facebook160 Twitter0 Email Print Conde Nast/Newscom Next From Mexico’s Cave of Crystals to waves frozen in time, these natural formations will make you look twice. 1. The Cave of Crystals Conde Nast/Newscom Mexico Mother Nature hid the largest crystals in the world nearly 1,000 feet below Naica Mountain, in the northwest region of Chihuahua, Mexico. The hidden caves were drained in 1975 but miners only unearthed these milky-white selenite crystals—spires of gypsum as long as flagpoles—in 2000. Though they may look icy, the mega crystals are forged in extreme heat, up to 122 degrees Fahrenheit and were developed in mineral-rich water over a period of 500,000 years. Researchers can only enter the cave for short periods of time, and there are plans to re-flood it to preserve the crystals. 2. The Wave Conde Nast/Newscom Utah and Arizona This awe-inspiring rock wave in shades of ochre and crimson unfolds through the Paria Canyon–Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness on the border of Utah and Arizona. First water, then wind eroded the Navajo sandstone, revealing layers of sand that blew through the area during the Jurassic period. Access to “the wave” is heavily restricted; the Bureau of Land Management hands out only 20 permits to the Coyote Buttes region a day. 3. Fingal’s Cave Conde Nast/GMS Photography Scotland Reminiscent of Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland, and just across the sea in Scotland’s Inner Hebrides, Fingal’s Cave on the island of Staffa boasts the same hexagonal basalt columns, but houses them in a cathedral-like sea cave with shimmering turquoise water. Not convinced Fingal’s Cave is superior? German composer Mendelssohn wrote an overture inspired by the acoustics he heard on his visit. 4. Wave Rock Nigel Killeen Australia Like a 46-foot-high cresting wave that’s never going to break, this odd rock formation in Hyden Wildlife Park is a popular photo stop on trips to western Australia. (Travelers tend to assume the surfer pose for pictures.) The wave was formed by the erosion of softer material at the bottom of the ancient granite dome, and the vertical stripes are the result of rain washing chemicals down its face. 5. Snow Rollers Conde Nast/Newscom USA Like a cross between tumbleweed, a hay bale and a doughnut, this natural phenomenon is rarely witnessed; it requires very specific snow conditions and wind speed. But when all the boxes are ticked, as they were this January in Ohio (pictured), the wind rolls an ever-growing snowball and then blows out its middle, creating this bizarre sight. See more weird natural wonders at Conde Nast Traveler More from Conde Nast Traveler Crazy Restaurants in Extreme Locations 10 Things Not to Do in Paris Why Does Airline Food taste So Bad? The Answer Might Surprise...

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9 things no one ever tells you about climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro

9 things no one ever tells you about climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro

By Jo Piazza Published March 09, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook44 Twitter0 livefyre9 Email Print Mt. Kilimanjaro is a climb of 19,340 feet through all kinds of terrain and vastly fluctuating temperatures. (Reuters) When my husband-to-be asked what I wanted to do for our honeymoon, I was stumped. I’m a travel editor. I’d traveled all over the world. We’d met in the Galapagos. How do you top that? Do you even try? We both love adventure and the outdoors, and we wanted a once-in-a-lifetime trip that would leave us with a sense of accomplishment, not just a tan. Then one night it hit me: “We’ll climb a mountain!” What better way to start a marriage than by scaling a high peak together? How symbolic. I paused and added, “What mountain can we climb without a lot of training or ropes?” Related Image Expand / Contract Massive fluctuations in temperature demand wool hats and athletic shorts. (Nick Aster) There are plenty of mountains where you can do that in the U.S.; Colorado alone is filled with them. But this was our honeymoon, and we wanted to get away, far away, to a land without cell service. All the way to Tanzania. Mt. Kilimanjaro, the tallest and most recognizable mountain in Africa, fit the bill. It takes hikers through five different ecosystems – from rainforest to alpine desert to arctic snowcap – and climbing 19,340 feet to the top is one of the most empowering adventures you can experience without serious training. About 35,000 people begin the climb each year. How many reach the summit is an elusive statistic. Related Image Expand / Contract Marching into the alpine desert. (Nick Aster) We hooked up with the adventure travel company Intrepid, because it has a wide variety of dates for different climbs and a good track record for getting people to the top. “Kili” climbs take anywhere from five to nine days, depending on your route and how much time you want to take to acclimate to the altitude. All tourists must register at the base and climb with a licensed guide. And at a cost of several thousand dollars, this isn’t something you do on a whim. This is one for the bucket list. I researched the climb before we left, but there are things I know now that I wish I’d known before I got there. They would have made the climb easier, more enjoyable and less uncomfortable. 1. Kilimanjaro is hard work. The literature describes it as a walk, but just because you don’t need special equipment doesn’t mean it’s easy. Parts of the trail are very steep and feel like they go on forever. There are sections filled with 2-foot-high boulders that feel like a StairMaster...

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The deadliest mountains in the world

The deadliest mountains in the world

Published December 30, 2015 Facebook35 Twitter0 Email Print iStock Next Mount Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, is the most talked about mountain. However, not the most dangerous mountain to climb. For decades, climbers have attempted, succeeded, and failed on their missions up these dangerous mountains. They have endured severe weather conditions as well as natural occurrences the mountain may throw their way.  Below are some of the deadliest mountains on the planet. 1. Mont Blanc Massif iStock Location: Western Alps Height: 15,782 ft summit Mont Blanc Massif has the highest peak in all of Europe. People die every year due to the high altitude and rock slides, making it arguably the most dangerous mountain to climb. There have been dozens of deaths every year. The total number of fatalities is between 6,000-8,000. 2. Annapurna iStock Location: in Central Nepal Height: 26,545 ft. 183 people have attempted to climb this mountain climb this mountain, 61 climers died trying. Annapurna has the highest fatality rate in the world. According to AdventureJournal.com, “The first 8,000-meter peak to go down is also arguably the worst.” In Oct. 2014, 39 people were killed because of snowstorms and avalanches. 3. K2 iStock Location: between Pakistan and China Height: 28,251 ft. Also, called Chogori or the Savage Mountain. K2 is the second tallest mountain on the planet. First you drive to the mountain, which according to experts is extremely dangerous, then you endure a 8 day hike. After, you begin your hike up the mountain. K2 has 300 successful summits and 80 fatalities. It has never been attempted to climb during the winter. 4. Nanga Parbat iStock Location: Northern Pakistan Height: 26,657 ft. Nanga Parbat is the 9th highest mountain in the world. It is also known as the Man Eater. Yes, the title speaks for itself… This mountain is covered in rocks and ice, making it extremely dangerous for climbers. The death rate has improved to 5.5 percent mainly due to the frequent storms and hazardous avalanches. 5. Kangchenjunga iStock Location: Nepal and India border Height: 28,169 ft. Kangchenjunga is the third highest mountain in the world. It has a 22 percent fatality due to the serious avalanche and weather hazards that occur on the mountain. The last part of the climb is almost vertical for more than 1,000 ft! Check out more of the world’s most dangerous mountains.  More from The Active Times Hike with a Guide: Treks Totally Worth Paying For Mountaintop Views Worth the Climb Top U.S. Mountain Towns for Relaxation This Winter The Most Dangerous SCUBA Dives in the World Originally available...

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Tourist stabbed to death in psychedelic Amazon jungle ceremony

Tourist stabbed to death in psychedelic Amazon jungle ceremony

Published December 18, 2015 SkyNews Facebook1073 Twitter0 Email Print A British man has been stabbed to death during a hallucinogenic ceremony in the Peruvian Amazon. A Canadian man is in custody after killing the Briton, Unais Gomes, 26, in apparent self-defense on Wednesday night. Witnesses said Gomes attacked the Canadian, 29-year-old Joshua Andrew Freeman Stevens, with a knife after suffering a bad trip. The pair had been drinking a hallucinogenic plant brew known as ayahuasca at a spiritual retreat near the jungle city of Iquitos. Ayahuasca, which is a combination of an Amazonian vine and dimethyltryptamine (DMT), gives users a psychedelic experience although it is not normally associated with violence. “It might be folkloric, spiritual or whatever else, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a drug that dramatically alters your state of mind,” police chief Normando Marques said. A local police source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Gomes is believed to have used a knife from the kitchen of a nearby alternative health center to attack Stevens. Stevens allegedly used the same knife to kill Gomes, stabbing him in the chest and stomach, the source said. Ayahuasca, also known as yage, is used by Amazonian tribes in Peru and Brazil as a spiritual or medicinal tool. Dozens of jungle retreats offer the brew to tourists. In 2012 an American teen died after drinking ayahuasca during a ritual in the Madre de Dios jungle region of Peru. A shaman later admitted trying to cover up the death by burying him in the grounds of the retreat. Click for more from Sky News.   Originally available...

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The coldest places on Earth

The coldest places on Earth

By Logan Orlando Published December 09, 2015 Facebook196 Twitter0 Email Print Getty Next Winter is coming—to some places quicker than others. To mark the season, we found the planet’s most frigid destinations. Have a look at these record-breaking shiver-inducers, best viewed with a warm blanket and a hot toddy. 1. Oymyakon, Russia Getty Considered earth’s coldest permanently inhabited place, it also nabbed the record for world’s coldest location, inhabited or otherwise, back in 1933 when the thermometer plunged to a mind and body-numbing -90. Today, the winter temperature in this remote Siberian landscape averages a bone-snapping 58 below. 2. Eureka, Canada Alamy Established in 1947, this research base sits on Ellesmere Island, which straddles the 80th parallel, and boasts the coldest winter temperatures of any coastal weather station around the Arctic perimeter. January and February temperatures are known to drop below -58° degrees, and winter 1979 saw a teeth-chattering -67.5° F. 3. Denali, Alaska Alamy North America’s tallest mountain (and third highest of the Seven Summits) hosts some of the world’s most severe weather, with extreme temperatures reaching -75° F, and a wind chill that can plummet to -118° F. Renamed in August to honor Alaska’s indigenous Athabascan people, this behemoth can freeze humans in an instant. 4. Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Getty Considered the world’s coldest national capital, this city averaged a staggering temperature of -41.3° F in January 2015, and, according to the World Meteorological Organization, has an average annual temperature of -2.4°. For its estimated 1.3 million residents, bearing a consistently icy climate is simply a way of life. 5. Vostok, Antarctica Gallery Stock A major Russian research base dating back to 1957, it’s also the World Meteorological Organization’s pick for the coldest recorded temperature in Antarctica, having clocked in at -128.6 degrees on July 21, 1983. 6. Rogers Pass, Montana Alamy Located on the continental divide and rising 5,610 feet above sea level, this high pass is home to the coldest recorded temperature in the contiguous United States thanks to a mercury-busting day back in January 1954 when the winter chill reached a record-setting -70° F. Bundle up and take a look at more of the coldest places on Earth. More from Conde Nast Traveler The 100 Best Hotels & Resorts in the World The Most Beautiful Travel Destinations of All Time  What It’s Like to Fly in Etihad’s First Class “Apartment” Drink Up: These Are The Greatest Bars in the World Originally available...

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