Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Exotic Locations

Hawaii’s terrifying ‘Stairway to Heaven’ could reopen with $100 fee for climbers

Hawaii’s terrifying ‘Stairway to Heaven’ could reopen with $100 fee for climbers

Published November 13, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook1057 Twitter358 livefyre Email Print The Haiku Stairs on the Hawaiian island of Oahu are an illegal tourist attraction. (iStock) Hawaii’s rickety Haiku Stairs on Oahu island have been closed to the public for over 30 years for safety reasons. But that hasn’t stopped thousands of tourists from climbing the 3,922 steel stairs that stretch precariously up Ko’olau mountain range each year. The sky-high staircase, damaged by landslides and weakened over years of neglect, boast some of the best views of the island, earning it the nickname “Stairway to Heaven.” In February, after a damaging storm  left five hikers stranded and permanently twisted sections of the metal railing, Honolulu’s Board of Water Supply—a state run agency that oversees the trail’s maintenance announced that the trail would be either handed over to another agency or be torn down completely. 2.14.2015: BREAKING NEWS from the Ha‘ikū Stairs. With the strong winds and soaking rains we had today, a hiker descending the stairs this afternoon took this photo. A landslide destroyed a portion of the Stairway to Heaven just above the first steep climb from the bottom! #NOTMYPHOTO #haikustairs #stairwaytoheaven #stairwaytoheavenoahu #stairwaytoheavenhike #hikinghawaii #hikehawaii #808alldaylong #808everyday #venturehawaii #livealoha #hawaiinei #onlyinhawaii #hawaiiunchained #povhawaii #marveloushawaii #hik3beasthawaii #instahi #insta808 #808state #thealohastyle #alohastate #instagramhawaii #hawaiianstyle #ighawaii #instahawaii #hilife #lookilivehawaii #oahu #ig_oahu #hawaiinei A photo posted by Kawika (@dgcpinoy) on Feb 14, 2015 at 6:41pm PST But now, thanks to a group of local residents and volunteers who have banded together under a nonprofit organization Friends of Haiku Stairs, there is a plan for the stairs to be repaired and reopened to the public. In October, Friends of Haiku Stairs laid out a plan to collect revenue from tourists and local hikers, which would fund reconstruction and subsidize maintenance costs, reports Pacific Business News. They’re proposing a plan that includes a $100 fee for out-of-state visitors, and a $5 to $20 fee for Hawaiian residents. While $100 may seem as the steep as the stairs,current fines for trespassing on the Haiku Stairs can be up to $600, with up to six months in prison. “If people realize what they’re paying for is going towards that particular venture, they’re very willing to pay that sort of money to experience something like this,” said Friends of Haiku Stairs’Vernon Ansdell.  He said the famous Hawaiian trail has been compared to major world attractions like Macchu Pichu. “If you could see the emails we get, people from around the world and Oahu are truly begging us to come and hike the stairs.” The Haiku Stairs, also known as the Haiku Ladder, were built during World War II. At its highest point, the stairs reach an altitude of 2,800...

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America’s scariest caves

America’s scariest caves

By Molly Dodd Published October 27, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook1025 Twitter141 livefyre7 Email Print iStock Next Caves can be scary–so they’re the perfect setting to get you in the Halloween spirit. Even better, some of these underground labyrinths are also reportedly haunted, so if you’re up for adventure and mystery, plan a visit to a cave closest to you. 1. Mammoth Cave: Kentucky iStock Mammoth Cave, located in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, is known as the largest haunted cave in America. Some 4000 years ago, people mined deep inside the cave, and the cave was sold to mine saltpeter. After several years, and after the War of 1812 made saltpeter desirable, the owner of the cave hired slaves to mine the cave. After the war, the business went under and the cave brought it’s first tourists. The cave was then used in 1842 to house people with Tuberculosis as an experiment. The cave is said to be haunted by the patients that died there. Mammoth Cave offers tours for $13, from 8:30am- 5:15pm 7 days a week. 2. Wind Cave: South Dakota NPS.gov Nestled in Wind Cave National Park, this cave is known as a sacred place for many native American tribes. But it’s generally believed that the cave was discovered by a pair of brothers, Jesse and Tom Bingham, in 1881. While hunting, the brothers saw some grass blowing near the cave entrance a which was a 8″ x 10″ hole in the ground. Tom had his hat knocked off by the winds blowing through the entrance, but then several days later, Jesse returned to the cave to find that the wind had switched directions and sucked Tom’s hat inside the cave. Today, it is understood that the movement of the wind is related to the difference in atmospheric pressure between the cave and the surface. But the brothers didn’t enter the cave.  That distinction went to Charlie Crary, a local miner, who in 1881 left twine to mark his trail so others could follow. He was the first to see the rare rock formation called boxwork, which closely resembles a large spider web. The cave is open everyday except for Christmas. Cave tours are offered 362 days a year, and tickets are sold for $30 on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are available for the Candlelight and Wild Cave tours, as well as for groups. 3. Bell Witch Cave: Tennessee Legend has it that John Bell, a farmer from North Carolina, settled in northern Robertson County in 1804 with his wife and children on a 320 acre farm along the Red River. In the summer of 1817, family members started seeing strange looking animals on their property and late at night they...

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Inside the Anzob ‘tunnel of death’ in Tajikistan

Inside the Anzob ‘tunnel of death’ in Tajikistan

Published October 28, 2015 Facebook306 Twitter393 Email Print Good luck getting out of here alive. The Anzob Tunnel was supposed to make life easier for people wanting to travel between Tajikistan’s major cities. Before the tunnel was built, drivers had to cross the border into Uzbekistan via a dirt road in order to travel between the Tajik capital of Duschanbe, and it’s second biggest city of Khujand. They also faced the threat of year-round avalanches blocking the roads, leaving people with the only option of flying — simply too expensive for most. So a 5km long, $4 billion tunnel, built by Iran, was meant to be a step up. The tunnel was officially opened in 2006 but remained unfinished until March this year. Within a matter of three months, it had to be closed for repair work and reopened in September. Click here for more auto news from News.com.au It quickly became known as the “tunnel of death” by locals and those who braved the nightmarish journey. It’s a dark, dangerous place, with hardly any lights inside and it’s suffocating as there’s no ventilation bar one fan. Locals have shared stories of a number of people dying inside it due to traffic jams that leave people trapped, where they succumbed to carbon monoxide. There’s also the fact it’s almost like an obstacle course, with huge, axle-snapping potholes threatening to swallow up the car, along with flooding that almost turns them into tunnel ponds. Throw in the hazard of falling rocks and you’ll want to be alert if you take on the journey. It’s also quite narrow — with a two-lane system, often ignored as drivers dodge obstacles. Explorer Silvan Graf described his experience with the road in a video uploaded to YouTube: “Even in good weather conditions the tunnel is flooded, turning the giant pot holes in the unfinished road into invisible death traps. “Unmarked drainage channels waiting to swamp your bike. The tunnel lacks proper lighting and ventilation, breathing is hard and painful due to the thick mixture of exhaust gases.” Check out the videos below to get a feel for the place. So why is it such a treacherous place? The Iranian Energy Ministry Alireza Dayemi has previously spoken out about the challenges of the project, including the high altitude, water pouring from the tunnel’s walls and the chill factor. “These factors have made this project distinctively different from the similar projects and made the process of this tunnels construction incomparable with the other similar ones,” Mr Dayemi told local news site FARS.   originally available...

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Taiwan opens terrifying glass bottomed walkway

Taiwan opens terrifying glass bottomed walkway

Published October 22, 2015 Facebook110 Twitter183 Email Print A new glass-bottomed bridge has become an instant hit with thrill-seeking tourists after opening in Nantou, Taiwan/ (australscope) This tourist attraction is bound to get your heart pumping. A huge 288-foot-long glass footbridge is now open to the public in Taiwan and is causing even the sturdiest legs to tremble. Taiwan has opened a glass bottomed bridge hovering 164 feet above a picturesque valley giving spectacular views, not only across, but for those brave enough to look down through the glass floor. Related Image Expand / Contract Taiwan has opened a glass bottomed bridge hovering 164 feet above a picturesque valley visitors giving spectacular views. (australscope) Observers suggest glass-bottomed bridges are “en vogue” currently in Asia. There is also 590 foot high glass-bottomed suspension bridge in Hunan, central China. Stretching almost 1,000 feet long, the glass suspension bridge is named Haohan Qiao, translating in English to “Brave Men’s Bridge” and it’s not hard to see why. Related Image Expand / Contract These images show the public using the bridge for the first time in Nantou, Taiwan. (australscope) The bridge was originally wooden until its conversion using glass panes 25 times stronger than normal glass. China also has plans for another glass-bottomed suspension bridge in the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon area, about 185 miles northwest of Shiniuzhai. When completed, it will be the world’s highest and longest glass bridge at over 1,400 feet long and 985 feet high. This story originally appeared on news.com.au. Originally available...

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VIDEO: Tourists plunge 26ft as suspension bridge collapses

VIDEO: Tourists plunge 26ft as suspension bridge collapses

Published October 09, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook3569 Twitter285 livefyre33 Email Print Tourists in New Zealand plunging approximately 25 feet into the water after a support cable broke on a suspension bridge they were crossing. (Whistle/YouTube) A group of French hikers miraculously suffered only bumps and scratches after a large footbridge they were crossing in New Zealand suddenly fell out from beneath them. Adrien Whistle and three friends were crossing the bridge near Lake Waikaremoana, on New Zealand’s North Island, Sept. 3 when a cable supporting the bridge snapped, according to the New Zealand Herald. The footage, captured and uploaded to YouTube by Whistle, shows the terrify moment they took the plunge while crossing the 213-foot-long Hopuruahinebridge in Hawkes Bay. In the video you see as the bridge, which is designed to carry a maximum of 10 people, snaps sending three of the tourists plummeting 26 feet into the river below, while the fourth clings to the mangled bridge. Amazingly, no one was injured. Department of Conservation operations manager Mike Slater told the Herald that authorities have launched an investigation, adding that the incident was an “extremely rare occurrence and we just need to understand in this particular case exactly what did happen.” Originally available...

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Hot air ballooning and cave dwelling in Cappadocia, Turkey

Hot air ballooning and cave dwelling in Cappadocia, Turkey

By Nadine Jolie Courtney Published October 08, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook111 Twitter164 livefyre3 Email Print The stunning Fairy chimneys. (Erik Courtney) Smack in the center of Turkey, only a 90-minute flight from Istanbul, lies a natural wonder: a remote mountainous region with Fairy chimneys – tall, spindly volcanic rock formations that stretch toward the sky – and thousands of ancient caves carved into the soft rocks of the wide moonscape valley. Welcome to Cappadocia, Turkey. What to Do The landscape is spectacular and the cave-dwelling – yes, visitors can sleep in cave hotels – is very cool, but Cappadocia may be best known for having one of the largest hot air ballooning industries in the world. Every morning hundreds of tourists gather before dawn at the more than 20 hot air ballooning companies around town, huddling over cups of coffee and yawning into their jackets as they wait for the tour buses to take them to the launch sites. Waking up at 3:30 a.m. for a 4 a.m. pickup isn’t easy, but all is forgiven once the balloons go skyward. Related Image Expand / Contract Waking up at the crack of dawn is exhausting, but worth it for views of the Cappadocia region like this. (Erik Courtney) The best hot air ballooning exists where there are majestic views – think Australian wine country, the Swiss Alps or the Serengeti plains – and Cappadocia’s rugged landscape doesn’t disappoint. Flights last between 30 minutes and 90 minutes, depending on the company and package you choose, with hour-long flights the most popular. My husband and I flew with Royal Balloon (the company Martha Stewart chose when she visited the area), and we chose the Royal Package, which includes pickup at your hotel, a breakfast buffet, a 90-minute balloon ride, and a champagne-and-strawberries toast upon landing. Now is the perfect time to go: October is the sweet spot between the oppressive heat of summer and the numbing cold of winter. There’s one more plus to waking up hours before the sun comes up. After your balloon adventure you have the entire day left to explore. Cappadocia, home to a UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Göreme Open-Air Museum, is truly a can’t-miss location. Unlike in America, where treasures are often hidden behind ropes or glass, tourists here can enjoy the experience of climbing up into the caves and trekking through “is-this-actually-legal?” areas that would definitely be off-limits in the U.S. Related Image Expand / Contract Cave dwellings offer amazing views and also a place to sleep. (Erik Courtney) Another must-see is the Underground Cities, a network of subterranean cities built during the Byzantine era to shelter as many as 20,000 Christians from Roman and Muslim invaders. The...

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