4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch

Published April 04, 2017

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Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life)

For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill…

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Outdoor Channel's Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017
FoxNews.com

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Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel)

Steve West …

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New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo

Published March 21, 2017

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 (iStock)

New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms.

According to a Bloomberg report, t…

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Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017
FoxNews.com

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More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock)

Think people are all about super luxurious getaway…

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Extreme Adventures

2 Americans reach top of Yosemite’s El Capitan in historic climb

2 Americans reach top of Yosemite’s El Capitan in historic climb

Published January 14, 2015 Associated Press Facebook539 Twitter454 Email Print Jan. 14, 2014: Shown is El Capitan where two climbers vying to become the first in the world to use only their hands and feet to scale a sheer slab of granite make their way to the summit Wednesday in Yosemite National Park, Calif. (AP) YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. –  A pair of Americans on Wednesday completed what had long been considered the world’s most difficult rock climb, using only their hands and feet to conquer a 3,000-foot vertical wall on El Capitan, the forbidding granite pedestal in Yosemite National Park that has beckoned adventurers for more than half a century. Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson became the first to “free-climb” the rock formation’s Dawn Wall, a feat that many had considered impossible. They used ropes and safety harnesses to catch them in case of a fall, but relied entirely on their own strength and dexterity to ascend by grasping cracks as thin as razor blades and as small as dimes. The effort took weeks, as the two dealt with constant falls and injuries. But their success completes a years-long dream that bordered on obsession for the men. The trek up the world’s largest granite monolith began Dec. 27. Caldwell and Jorgeson lived on the wall itself. They ate and slept in tents fastened to the rock thousands of feet above the ground and battled painful cuts to their fingertips much of the way. Free-climbers do not pull themselves up with cables or use chisels to carve out handholds. Instead, they climb inch by inch, wedging their fingertips and feet into tiny crevices or gripping sharp, thin projections of rock. In photographs, the two appeared at times like Spider-Man, with arms and legs splayed across the pale rock that has been described as smooth as a bedroom wall. Both men needed to take rest days to wait for their skin to heal. They used tape and even superglue to help with the process. At one point, Caldwell set an alarm to wake him every few hours to apply a special lotion to his throbbing hands. They also took physical punishment when their grip would slip, pitching them into long, swinging falls that left them bouncing off the rock face. The tumbles, which they called “taking a whipper,” ended in startling jolts from their safety ropes. Caldwell and Jorgeson had help from a team of supporters who brought food and supplies and shot video of the adventure. The 36-year-old Caldwell and 30-year-old Jorgeson ate canned peaches and occasionally sipped whiskey. They watched their urine evaporate into thin, dry air and handed toilet sacks, called “wag bags,” to helpers who disposed of them. There...

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Terror and triumph on Whistler’s via ferrata

Terror and triumph on Whistler’s via ferrata

Rupert Davies, of Whistler Alpine Guides, maneuvers the via ferrata. (Blane Bachelor) Next I’m standing on a rebar rung, clinging to another rung, hundreds of feet off the ground on a near-vertical stretch of Whistler Mountain – with nowhere to go but up. But first I have to go sideways, across a sizable chasm with a horrifying expanse of open air below. “So, has anyone else besides me ever cried up here?” And I can’t move. I’m having what feels like my first-ever panic attack – my breathing is labored, my hands and feet are cemented in place, and I honestly think these could be my last moments. I can hear my mom’s voice in my head: “I BEGGED her not to do it!” Then I hear another voice, a real one, from a few feet below: “Trust your boots,” it says calmly, matter-of-factly. The voice comes from Rupert, the friendly, redheaded guide who has done this so many times before – eased an adventure-goer like me back from full-blown fear into the business of finding her next foothold. So I do what he says: I trust my boots. I pull my foot off the rung and swing it through space to find the next one, my hands following. My boots hold, and for now, my sanity does, too. And so it goes for the next couple of hours: rung by rung, step by step, section by steep section on Whistler’s via ferrata – Italian for “iron way” – a trail of iron rungs and cables fixed into the mountainside that create a vertical route to the top. It’s a great way for non-rock jocks like me to experience dizzying heights and spectacular views once available only to hardcore climbers. The first via ferratas weren’t developed for adrenaline-seekers. The Italian army built them during World War I to move troops and supplies quickly through the Dolomite mountains. Climbers discovered them in the 1960s, and since then hundreds of via ferratas have popped up throughout Europe and in countries including Malaysia, New Zealand and Japan. They’re less commonplace in the United States – a handful of sites includes Yosemite’s Half-Dome, though it’s not usually referred to as a via ferrata – thanks to government regulations against permanent climbing anchors. This high-altitude adventure, which has been operating in Whistler for about 10 years, is a big reason I’ve come to this ski-obsessed town in British Columbia in the summer. Unfortunately, the steady, chilly rain is anything but summery as our group of four – another woman who appears to be in her late 30s and a pair of fit-looking guys in top-of-the-line mountain gear – arrives for the excursion. We’re good to go as long as there’s no lightning –...

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The most dangerous trips in the world

The most dangerous trips in the world

Reinhard Dirscherl / Alamy For your next vacation, take a walk on the wild side. Sitting on the beach or going for a nice stroll are so yesterday. Why not try climbing one of the steepest cliff faces in the world or swimming with live jellyfish? Some of these outlandish vacation excursions might not be everyone’s speed but if you’re feeling adventurous, it’s nice to have a few options. 1. Jellyfish Lak – Eil Malk, Palau Reinhard Dirscherl / Alamy Remember the jellyfish scene from Finding Nemo? That’s pretty much exactly what Palau’s Jellyfish Lake is like. Located on Eil Malk Island, this marine lake is home to millions of jellyfish that slowly migrate across the water each day, following the path of the sun. Tourists can obtain a pass to visit the island and snorkel among the golden jellies and moon jellies. Although these stingers are (mostly) harmless, you may feel a twinge around sensitive body parts. Be careful not to dive too deep into the pool—the lower level contains dangerous amounts of hydrogen sulfide, which can be deadly. 2. Villarrica Volcano – Chile Gary Cook / Alamy The Villarrica volcano in southern Chile is a go-to destination for the craziest of daredevils. During the summer, thousands of tourists attempt to hike to the top of the volcano (one of the few in the world with an active lava lake) on guided tours. Come wintertime, even braver groups climb the glacial slopes while dodging crevasses and avalanches. If neither of those seasonal options appeals to you, there’s always the ultimate feat of courage: bungee jumping from the skid of a helicopter right above the volcano’s bubbling crater. Could anything be better for your next relaxing vacation? 3. North Yungas Road – Bolivia Stock Connection Blue / Alamy The path from La Paz to Coroico, Bolivia, is a treacherous one. The North Yungas Road weaves precariously through the Amazon rainforest at a height of over 15,000 feet. When you consider that frightening elevation—not to mention the 12-foot-wide single lane, lack of guardrails, and limited visibility due to rain and fog—it’s easy to see why this 50-mile stretch of highway has earned the nickname “The Death Road.” While 200 to 300 drivers used to die here annually, North Yungas Road has now become more of a destination for adventurous mountain bikers than a vehicular thoroughfare. 4. Teanupoo – Taiarapu-Ouest, Tahiti National Geographic Image Collection / Alamy Surfing is a perilous sport in and of itself, but the risk increases exponentially when Tahiti’s famous Teahupoo wave becomes a factor. The top-heavy swells of the wave can reach heights of up to 21 feet, making it a popular destination for professional (and daring) surfers. There have been five recorded...

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Take a walk in the clouds on new suspension bridge between mountain peaks

Take a walk in the clouds on new suspension bridge between mountain peaks

A mock-up of Peak Walk.Glacier3000.com Need a little fresh air? Try taking a walk nearly 10,000 feet above ground on this suspension bridge that will link two peaks in the Swiss Alps. The new bridge will link two mountains: Glacier 3000 and Scex Rouge and soar 9,700 feet into the sky. According to Glacier 3000’s website, this 350 foot bridge will be the first of its kind. Features of the bridge include a partial glass floor that allows walkers to gaze into the drop below and it will be strong enough to support up to 300 people at a time. The project is called ‘Peak Walk,’ and will provide stunning views  of the surrounding vistas including Mont Blanc and Eiger mountains. Made from steel cables, the bridge has been designed to stay open year round and will be strong enough to withstand winds of up to 155mph, reports the Daily Mail. Peak Walk is estimated to cost around $3.4 million and has already faced construction delays due to poor weather conditions in the Swiss Alps over the summer and workers having a difficult time acclimating to thin air at high altitudes. Though the bridge is the first of its kind as it will the tallest suspension bridge connecting two peaks, the honor of the tallest suspension bridge goes to theTitlis Cliff Walk in Obwalden, Switzerland, which connects a mountain to a chair lift station, 9,977 feet above sea...

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An East African safari is full of surprises

By George Hobica Published April 25, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook7 Twitter63 Gplus2 Don’t forget your camera gear, because you will get a chance to see animals up close.GEORGE HOBICA Next I had never been to Africa before in all my years of traveling, and never on a safari. When given the opportunity, I didn’t exactly jump on it. I’m not sure why. Was it the vaccinations, the visas or the long flights to Nairobi? I was to travel to Kenya and Tanzania with Micato Safaris.  Before the trip I was deluged with information (Micato is the most detail-oriented travel company I’ve encountered). Brochures. Pamphlets. Packing lists. Would we really be sleeping in tents? Flying in single engine planes and landing on grass fields? It was all a bit daunting. I read all the information twice, but as it turned out, nothing prepared me fully for the actual experience. Here are some of the things I found most surprising, and perhaps they’ll help you if you’re contemplating a similar trip one day. You don’t need to bring a lot of anything You really need very little, so my advice is to take half (or less) of what is suggested by your safari outfitter’s packing list. The brochures make it clear that because you’ll be flying in small planes between camps, you need to limit the weight of your luggage to 33 pounds. In truth, no one ever weighed a single bag, and the heaviest items in my luggage were cameras and lenses. Every lodge and campsite on the trip offered professionally done-the-same-day laundry, included in the price. In fact, you could get by with what you wear on the plane and two changes of clothes, period.  I brought four changes and frankly, I over packed, since I availed myself of the laundry services each day. Save room in your bag for lots of camera equipment (a backup camera is a good idea, in case one breaks), batteries, lenses and so forth. Do, however, avoid bright colors (tsetse flies love blue for some reason). Khaki and tan are the way to go, even if they’re not your colors. You’ll get close to the animals. Really close Of course you expect to see all sorts of animals in the wild. That’s what a safari is all about. But you’ll sometimes be mere feet away from elephants, zebras, lions, hippos and other game. Do not get out of your Land Rover to get any closer. The animals won’t like it. And neither will your guides. Luxury accommodations in a tent Sleeping in tents is not what you think. Yes, some camps consist of canvas-clad tents, but they’re deluxe tents, with firm mattresses, hot and cold running water, exemplary service, fine furnishings, and...

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At least 12 dead, 3 missing after avalanche sweeps Mount Everest

Published April 18, 2014 Associated Press Facebook108 Twitter378 Gplus0 Mount Everest (C), the world highest peak, and other peaks of the Himalayan range are seen from air during a mountain flight from Kathmandu April 24, 2010. (REUTERS/Tim Chong) KATMANDU, Nepal –  An avalanche swept Mount Everest’s slopes on Friday along a route used to climb the world’s highest peak, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the worst disaster to hit climbers on the mountain, officials said. The Sherpa guides had gone early in the morning to fix ropes for other climbers when the avalanche hit just them below Camp 2 at about 6:30 a.m., Nepal Tourism Ministry official Krishna Lamsal said from the base camp where he is monitoring rescue efforts. Rescue workers pulled out 12 bodies from under mounds of snow and ice and were searching for the three missing guides, Lamsal said. Two Sherpas who were injured were taken by helicopter to hospitals in Nepal’s capital, Katmandu. Hundreds of climbers, their guides and support crews have gathered at the base camp to prepare for attempts to scale the 29,035-foot mountain early next month when weather conditions become favorable. They have been setting up camps at higher altitudes and guides have been fixing routes and ropes on the slopes above. As soon as the avalanche hit, rescuers and fellow climbers rushed to help. Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association said the area where the avalanche hit is nicknamed the “popcorn field” and is just below Camp 2 at 21,000 feet. Earlier this year, Nepal announced several steps to better manage the heavy flow of climbers and speed up rescue operations. The steps included the dispatch of officials and security personnel to the base camp at 17,380 feet, where they will stay throughout the spring climbing season that ends in May. More than 4,000 climbers have scaled the summit since 1953, when it was first conquered by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hundreds have died attempting to reach the peak. The worst recorded disaster on Everest was on May 11, 1996, when eight climbers were killed in one day because of a snow storm near the summit. Six Nepalese guides were killed in an avalanche in...

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