Airlines experimenting with kid-free zones on planes

By Cailey Rizzo | Travel + Leisure

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A few airlines have instituted no-children-allowed policies in certain areas of the plane.  (iStock)

Last m…

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Everything you can get for free at the airport

By Andrea Romano | Travel + Leisure

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iStock  (Did you know you can do yoga at the airport? Here’s everything you can do for free on your next long layov…

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Airline reveals which windows seats you should always avoid

news.com.au

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If you want a spot with a view, be sure to avoid these window seats.  (iStock)

How many times have you boarded a plane and arrived …

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Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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Extreme Adventures

An East African safari is full of surprises

By George Hobica Published April 25, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook7 Twitter63 Gplus2 Don’t forget your camera gear, because you will get a chance to see animals up close.GEORGE HOBICA Next I had never been to Africa before in all my years of traveling, and never on a safari. When given the opportunity, I didn’t exactly jump on it. I’m not sure why. Was it the vaccinations, the visas or the long flights to Nairobi? I was to travel to Kenya and Tanzania with Micato Safaris.  Before the trip I was deluged with information (Micato is the most detail-oriented travel company I’ve encountered). Brochures. Pamphlets. Packing lists. Would we really be sleeping in tents? Flying in single engine planes and landing on grass fields? It was all a bit daunting. I read all the information twice, but as it turned out, nothing prepared me fully for the actual experience. Here are some of the things I found most surprising, and perhaps they’ll help you if you’re contemplating a similar trip one day. You don’t need to bring a lot of anything You really need very little, so my advice is to take half (or less) of what is suggested by your safari outfitter’s packing list. The brochures make it clear that because you’ll be flying in small planes between camps, you need to limit the weight of your luggage to 33 pounds. In truth, no one ever weighed a single bag, and the heaviest items in my luggage were cameras and lenses. Every lodge and campsite on the trip offered professionally done-the-same-day laundry, included in the price. In fact, you could get by with what you wear on the plane and two changes of clothes, period.  I brought four changes and frankly, I over packed, since I availed myself of the laundry services each day. Save room in your bag for lots of camera equipment (a backup camera is a good idea, in case one breaks), batteries, lenses and so forth. Do, however, avoid bright colors (tsetse flies love blue for some reason). Khaki and tan are the way to go, even if they’re not your colors. You’ll get close to the animals. Really close Of course you expect to see all sorts of animals in the wild. That’s what a safari is all about. But you’ll sometimes be mere feet away from elephants, zebras, lions, hippos and other game. Do not get out of your Land Rover to get any closer. The animals won’t like it. And neither will your guides. Luxury accommodations in a tent Sleeping in tents is not what you think. Yes, some camps consist of canvas-clad tents, but they’re deluxe tents, with firm mattresses, hot and cold running water, exemplary service, fine furnishings, and...

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At least 12 dead, 3 missing after avalanche sweeps Mount Everest

Published April 18, 2014 Associated Press Facebook108 Twitter378 Gplus0 Mount Everest (C), the world highest peak, and other peaks of the Himalayan range are seen from air during a mountain flight from Kathmandu April 24, 2010. (REUTERS/Tim Chong) KATMANDU, Nepal –  An avalanche swept Mount Everest’s slopes on Friday along a route used to climb the world’s highest peak, killing at least 12 Nepalese guides and leaving three missing in the worst disaster to hit climbers on the mountain, officials said. The Sherpa guides had gone early in the morning to fix ropes for other climbers when the avalanche hit just them below Camp 2 at about 6:30 a.m., Nepal Tourism Ministry official Krishna Lamsal said from the base camp where he is monitoring rescue efforts. Rescue workers pulled out 12 bodies from under mounds of snow and ice and were searching for the three missing guides, Lamsal said. Two Sherpas who were injured were taken by helicopter to hospitals in Nepal’s capital, Katmandu. Hundreds of climbers, their guides and support crews have gathered at the base camp to prepare for attempts to scale the 29,035-foot mountain early next month when weather conditions become favorable. They have been setting up camps at higher altitudes and guides have been fixing routes and ropes on the slopes above. As soon as the avalanche hit, rescuers and fellow climbers rushed to help. Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association said the area where the avalanche hit is nicknamed the “popcorn field” and is just below Camp 2 at 21,000 feet. Earlier this year, Nepal announced several steps to better manage the heavy flow of climbers and speed up rescue operations. The steps included the dispatch of officials and security personnel to the base camp at 17,380 feet, where they will stay throughout the spring climbing season that ends in May. More than 4,000 climbers have scaled the summit since 1953, when it was first conquered by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hundreds have died attempting to reach the peak. The worst recorded disaster on Everest was on May 11, 1996, when eight climbers were killed in one day because of a snow storm near the summit. Six Nepalese guides were killed in an avalanche in...

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Glass-bottomed attractions: spectacular views at terrifying heights

Published April 16, 2014 Facebook47 Twitter68 Gplus1 Dennis Watts Next Embrace the vertigo—the view from these skywalks, glass bridges, and see-through observation decks are worth it. Check out the list for dizzying images of the Alps, the Grand Canyon, New Zealand, and more. 1. Grand Canyon Skywalk Dennis Watts Grand Canyon West (Hualapai Reservation), Arizona Sure, the views of the Grand Canyon are spectacular from pretty much any angle, but none are as thrilling as looking through the glass walkway that juts out over the Canyon’s western rim; the horseshoe-shaped path is suspended 4,000 feet (shudder) above the canyon floor. Tours include a hop-on, hop-off shuttle bus ticket that takes you to the Skywalk as well as viewpoints back on terra firma. 2. Dachstein Sky Walk Erich Hagspiel Dachstein, Austria A visit to the Dachstein Sky Walk starts with a gondola ride, which delivers sprawling vistas of its own, but it’s only upon arriving at the platform that you’ll get to peer straight down, 820 feet, at the Dachstein glacier and up into the Alps. Not enough high-altitude scenery? Take a walk across the suspension bridge—the highest in Austria—for more breathtaking views. 3. Sky Tower Sky Tower Auckland, New Zealand From the main observation deck in Auckland’s Sky Tower, look down—way down—at the city through a glass floor that’s just an inch and a half thick. (Touch-screen computers with live cameras will tell you what you’re looking at.) And, since this is New Zealand, of course that’s not the only thrill the Sky Tower provides—you can also base jump off the tower. 4. The Edge at Eureka Skydeck 88 The Edge Melbourne, Australia The Eureka Tower claims to be the tallest residential tower in the entire Southern Hemisphere. You can take in the view from the 360-degree observation deck or open-air terrace, but, for a little bit of extra cash, you can step into The Edge—a glass cube that sticks out nearly 10 feet from the rest of the building, more than 980 feet above the ground. Even the elevators here are thrilling: They reach the 88th floor in less than 40 seconds. 5. Glacier Skywalk Brewster Travel Canada Jasper National Park, Canada One of the newest glass-floored attractions, the Glacier Skywalk in the Canadian Rockies, doesn’t open to the public until May 1. When it does, you’ll definitely want to add it to your must-do list. The curved walkway extends 100 feet off the edge of a cliff, holding steady 918 feet above the Sunwapta Valley. From the observation platform, you can see out across the valley and up into the mountains of Jasper National Park. See more spectacular views at Conde Nast Traveler More from Conde Nast Traveler Crazy Restaurants in Extreme Locations 10...

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Top 10 countries with deadliest roads for travelers

Published February 21, 2014 FoxNews.com When going abroad, you don’t always think about the safety of the roads in the country you are traveling to – but you should. Maybe you rely on a taxi or bus driver to negotiate the single-lane roads or mountain passes without guard rails.  Or you think there’s no problem with getting behind the wheel in a foreign country.  But in some countries, simply crossing the street can be a risk. A report released this month by the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Initiative highlights the countries with the most car-accident deaths. Drawing on 2008 data from the World Health Organization, the report compares international car-crash fatality rates against the mortality rates from other leading causes of death, like cancer and heart disease. “The results of this study indicate that, in many parts of the world, fatalities from road crashes represent an unexpectedly large proportion of all fatalities,” study author Michael Sivak told Live Science. The worldwide average number of car-crash related deaths per 100,000 people per year is only 18, but in some countries that number is more than doubled. The U.S. comes in right around the middle, with 14 car-crash fatalities per 100,000 people. Auto accidents account for 1.8 percent of all deaths. So strap on your seatbelt and take a look at the 10 deadliest countries to drive in. 1Namibia AP 45 deaths per 100,000 people per year Namibia has the highest car-accident death rate in the world, with 45 people killed on the road out of every 100,000 citizens. The country’s roads are notoriously dangerous because travellers are not familiar with the landscape and conditions. Drivers run the risk of rolling their vehicles on the African nation’s gravel roads. 2Thailand Reuters 44 deaths per 100,000 people per year Driving in Thailand is challenging and dangerous. The country has a heavy volume of traffic in cities and its roadways are not well maintained and marked. According to InterNations, an international online community for people who live and work abroad, driving in Thailand “is not for the faint of heart.” 3Iran AP 38 deaths per 100,000 people per year The U.S. State Department encourages tourists to avoid driving in Iran because Iranian driving is so dangerous there. The tourism agency Let’s Go Iranadvises foreign drivers to “take care when crossing the roads, and even greater care when driving on them – Iranian drivers tend to overtake along pavements and any section of the road where there is space.” 4Sudan Reuters 36 deaths per 100,000 people per year Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade offers some suggestions for driving in Sudan, stating that touring the country by car “can be dangerous due to poorly maintained roads, poor vehicle maintenance,...

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Top places to come face-to-face with animals

Published January 27, 2014 Condé Nast Traveler Dubai may have that huge aquarium, and San Diego may have its famous zoo. But nothing beats seeing an animal face-to-face in the wild. Time to get up close and personal with nature’s finest. 1Wade with Pigs F 1.2/Conde Nast Pig Beach, Bahamas Pigs still can’t fly, but there is a group of swine that loves to swim in part of the uninhabited Big Major Cay, known as Pig Beach. How the pigs got there is quite the mystery. One local theory is that the animals found their way to the island after getting tossed overboard from a shipwrecked supply boat. 2Frolic with Rabbits AFLO CO. LTD/Conde Nast Rabbit Island (Okunoshima), Japan Okunoshima, a.k.a. Rabbit Island, housed a secret chemical weapons plant in the 1920s that was shut down after World War II. Today the island is known for a far more pleasant reason: It’s home to a massive population of rabbits, who aren’t afraid to jump into visitors’ laps in exchange for a carrot. (Some believe that these furry residents are descendants of the test bunnies that were freed after the plant’s closing.) 3Scuba with Whale Sharks iStock Isla Mujeres, Mexico Isla Mujeres, in the Yucatán Peninsula, is home to the largest population of whale sharks in the world. Luckily, these gentle giants—which can grow more than 40 feet long and weigh up to 15 tons—don’t have teeth and are not afraid to interact with humans. That’s why many tour operators allow you to snorkel or scuba dive near the massive creatures. 4Stroll with Sea Lions AP San Francisco When your ferry returns from Alcatraz, head over to San Francisco’s famous Pier 39 and follow the barking sounds to the West Marina K-Dock—where you will find hundreds of California sea lions sunbathing, chatting, and jumping in and out of the water. These lovable creatures first arrived in late 1989. By 1990, the population had grown to 300, pushing out marina tenants. Today, 1,000 sea lions call K-Dock their home each winter. Not headed to California any time soon? Watch the action on the Sea Lion Web Cam. 5Swim with Jellyfish Palau Visitors Authority Jellyfish Lake, Eil Malk, Palau On the island of Eil Malk snorkel and scuba diving tours often stop at Jellyfish Lake so guests can swim with the jellies. The resident golden jellyfish in these secluded waters have lost their ability to sting and live predator-free. See more places where you can come face-to-face with animals at Condé Nast Traveler More from Condé Nast Traveler The Best Ski Resorts in North America The 10 Most Terrifying Highways for Brave Road-Trippers This Island Went Back in Time to Get First Dibs...

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World’s tallest waterslide is almost as high as Niagara Falls

Published January 20, 2014 FoxNews.com The tallest waterslide in the world is still under construction. (YOUTUBE) Think you’ve got what it takes to ride the world’s tallest waterslide? After checking out this video you may think twice before heading to Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City Verrückt Meg-a-Blaster is still under construction, but one look at this paralyzing video just released by the park reveals a ride that’s for pure adrenaline junkies. At 140 feet tall, Verrückt is set to be become to world’s tallest waterslide when it opens in May. For reference, Niagara Falls is only a little bit taller at 167 feet. Four riders will be able to reach speeds of more than 60 mph while plunging down this death-defying drop. Water park fans have been eagerly awaiting the new slide since photos of the project began surfacing last year. Check out the video below to get in on the action:   4 ways to save huge at Orlando theme parks       Orlando theme parks get set to launch cool, new summer attractions       Top 4 dinosaur theme parks   ALSO ON THE...

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