Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

Fox News

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Fishing

Marines take on ‘fish from hell’ in Quantico snakehead derby

By Joshua Rhett Miller Published June 04, 2013 FoxNews.com Exotic, nonnative fish like snakeheads can disrupt natural aquatic systems and may transmit parasites and diseases, although biologists in Virginia say their impact may not be as bad as initially feared. (DGIF) John Odenkirk, a biologist for the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, told FoxNews.com that while a reliable estimate is unknown, he expects “tens of thousands” of snakeheads to inhabit Virginia waters. (DGIF) Sgt. Maj. Robert Breeden, the Marine Corps Air Facility Quantico sergeant major, holds a 3-foot, 13-pound snakehead after catching it with a bow in Chopawamsic Creek last April. (Courtesy: Marine Corps Base Quantico) Next Slide Previous Slide The few, the proud, the snakehead hunters. Leathernecks from Marine Corps Base Quantico will take their hooks and bows to all public waters in and around the Virginia military training installation on Friday and Saturday as part of the base’s first snakehead fishing tournament. The two-day contest will culminate with a weigh-in and prizes will be doled out for the largest snakehead captured, as well as for the most total weight of all species combined. “The main goal here is to encourage some good outdoor recreation for the Marines, their families and the general public,” Euel Tritt, a conservation officer at Quantico and one of the event’s organizers, told FoxNews.com. “And they’re an invasive species in the waterways, so it’s a win-win situation.” Dubbed “fishzilla” and the “fish from hell” for its sharp teeth, aggressive demeanor and ability to wriggle across short distances on land, the snakehead is believed to have been introduced to North America through a fish market in New York City’s Chinatown. Once dumped alive in U.S. waterways, the hardy fish, which has a ravenous appetite and no natural predators, exploded in population and became an ecological nightmare. It’s illegal to possess a live snakehead in Virginia. While no reliable estimate exists as to how many northern snakeheads are found in Virginia waters, the non-native species was first identified in 2004 and has since grown to “relative abundance,” according to John Odenkirk, a biologist for the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. “We’re working on coming up with a reliable estimate by the end of this year, but the bottom line is nobody knows,” Odenkirk said of the state’s snakehead population. “The jury is still out.” In Little Hunting Creek alone, a 3.5-mile-long tributary of the Potomac River, Odenkirk said up to 500 adult snakeheads were recently counted and he expects “tens of thousands” more to be thriving in all of Virginia’s tidal tributaries, including Dogue Creek, Pohick Creek and several others.   “Whatever swims in front of its head, it’s going to eat.” –...

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Animal Planet dives into new waters with ‘Top Hooker’

By Leora Arnowitz Published May 29, 2013 FoxNews.com “Top Hooker” Host Reno Collier with all 10 contestants. (Animal Planet) “Top Hooker” contestant Larysa is shown. (Animal Planet) Next Slide Previous Slide Animal Planet is heading into some deep waters with its new fishing competition series, “Top Hooker.” The show features 10 professional anglers who compete to take home $30,000, a new car and of course the coveted title of “Top Hooker.” “It’s not like… your grandpa’s fishing show,” explained host Reno Collier, who guides the competitors throughout the rigorous challenges. “It’s fast paced. It’s exciting.” Collier, whose best known for his work as a comedian, told FOX 411 the show –unlike many reality series on TV today– is one the whole family can enjoy together. “For one thing a family can watch it,” he said. “You can watch it with your kids.” And he added that the series isn’t just aimed at fishing pros. “What’s funny is my wife… She loved it. My kids love it,” he said. “Obviously, guys, sportsmen, other anglers are going to love it… but the competition is so heated it doesn’t matter if you fish or not.” The “Top Hooker” challenges include some tough physical work, such as fishing while on zip lines and bow fishing, Collier said. “There’s some things that come down to the wire that were amazing. A lot of the Jet Ski stuff out in the Pacific was pretty wild,” he said. “They caught some stuff they didn’t think they were going to catch.” And after a hard day’s work the fishermen –and women—didn’t head to a luxurious hotel, but rather they camped out, spending the nights in the wild. “They roughed it through it,” Collier said. “That became an issue, just exhaust. And being exhausted and not getting any sleep on top of it.” For Collier, the rigorous competition made his job easy. He said his jokes were rarely needed to keep the series entertaining. “It really turned out to be much more challenging for these people than, I think, anybody thought. Everything was so exciting and it was moving so fast that I didn’t have any pressure on me [to be funny].” “Top Hooker” premieres on Animal Planet on Sunday, June 2 at 10 p.m. ET.  Read...

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Fishermen falling for new bass species hook, line and sinker

By Joshua Rhett Miller Published May 08, 2013 FoxNews.com This Choctaw bass was collected from Florida’s Holmes Creek in February 2012. The fish will now likely be a top target for catch-and-release fishermen in the southeastern United States. (FWC) Next Slide Previous Slide There’s a new bass in town, and fishing fanatics predict anglers will find its lure impossible to resist.State wildlife experts in Florida confirmed the newest member of America’s top freshwater fighting family is the Micropterus haiaka, now known as the Choctaw bass. The fish has been around for years, but was previously lumped in with another, nearly identical-appearing species, the spotted bass. But word that there could be a new-ish fish on the other end of the line is enough to send anglers scrambling for their tackle boxes. “I suspect there will be a lot of folks who will want to go out and catch one now,” said Robert Cartlidge, president of The Bass Federation. “Anything new is obviously exciting and there’s certainly some excitement about it.” Scientists from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission first noted a DNA profile that did not belong to any recognized species while testing a bass specimen from Florida’s 92-mile-long Chipola River as part of a larger genetic study of the popular game fish in 2007. But confirmation took years. “We didn’t set out to find a new species,” said Mike Tringali, who heads the genetics laboratory at the FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. “It found us.”   “I suspect there will be a lot of folks who will want to go out and catch one now.” – Robert Cartlidge, president, The Bass Federation   After confirming the initial find, scientists then searched for the DNA profile in bass captured in nearby rivers to determine its range. The Choctaw bass was found to inhabit river systems in Alabama and Florida, including the Choctawhatcee River. The species is also suspected to be living in the Pearl River in Mississippi and Louisiana, according to Tringali. Once formally recognized, Tringali said the fish would be the tenth species of bass, and the first new species found since 2009. At just a few pounds and roughly 14 inches in length at full maturity, it’s not one of the larger bass, he said. The proposed name references the geographic connection to the indigenous range of the Native American Choctaw tribe. The scientific designation “haiaka” is translated from the Choctaw language, meaning “revealed” or “manifest,” Tringali said. The American Fisheries Society will now approve the suggested scientific name for it to become official. The physical characteristics of the Choctaw bass are very similar to the spotted bass, making distinction between the two difficult by the naked eye. They...

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Best high-tech fishing gear

By John Brandon Heading out for a day of fishing? Be sure to pack this extra gear, which can make your excursion much more productive. There’s a solar charger for your trolling motor, a lightweight fishing jacket, and something that will provide some extra pop for shore-fishing day trips: a powerful ATV with two gear racks.   Fishermen fishing in Dnipro river at sunset in the Ukrainian capital Kiev late Monday, May 30, 2011. Kiev is one of Ukraine’s four host cities for the Euro 2012 soccer tournament. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)Source: AP GraphicsBank 2013 Yamaha Grizzly 550 FI Auto. 4×4 EPS Best feature: Gets you to the fishing spots faster For traveling around in lake country, this powerful 558cc ATV is what you want. Using a camouflage design means you’ll blend in easier with the decor. The electronic power steering, independent four-wheel suspension, and lockable or automatic 4WD means you’ll get a comfortable ride. Extra-durable front and back racks provide plenty of space for tackle boxes and other fishing gear. Source: Yamaha PowerPot Best feature: Cooker doubles as a phone charger This thermoelectric generator is what you want after a long day of fishing. (After all, you’ll need a way to charge your phone.) The 5V USB plug provides power for any phone, tablet, camera, or even a USB-connected fish finder or GPS. When you boil water, the generator converts the energy to electrical power. Source: PowerPot Patagonia River Salt Jacket Best feature: High-tech durable fishing shell for cold days This fly-fishing jacket is made from a four-ply waterproof material that’s designed to keep you warm and dry. The zippers are all waterproof and lightweight, and the cuffs seal to watertightness. There are three front pockets that provide easy access to fly boxes and other gear. The whole jacket weighs only 23 ounces. Source: Patagonia Magellan eXplorist 510 Pro Angler Best feature: Finding the best fishing spots Knowing where to fish is half the battle. The ruggedized eXplorist 510 Pro Anger includes some 4,000 lakes and waterways, but goes a step further: an indicator shows “points of interest” (aka, the best fishing spots) along with the ideal baits, lures, colors, and seasons. You can view 2D or topographical maps. A built-in camera and mic allow you to snap photos and record notes for a trip. Source: Magellan GoalZero Guardian Best feature: solar panel and pack for a trolling motor An ingenious addition to your gear load-out, this solar panel and charger combo connects to any 12V battery, including one for a trolling motor. As you tool around the lake, you can fold the 10.5-inch Nomad 13 solar panel to continually charge. Goal Zero says the charger should keep you motoring...

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Fishhound Releases List of 50 Best Crappie Lakes

by Fishhound on March 6, 2013 Want to land some bragging size crappie?  Maybe even break the current IGFA all-tackle record? You’d be wise to fish the lakes rated by Fishhound.com as the best in the country for oversized slabs. Fishhound compiled its “50 Best Crappie Lakes” list (http://www.fishhound.com/best-crappie-fishing-lakes) after consulting with a host of industry experts, including veteran outdoor writers, professional crappie anglers, companies like Blakemore and Southern Pro, and organizations such as Crappie USA, Crappie Masters and Crappie Nation. “We devoted considerable time and resources to develop this list based on feedback from some of the most experienced and knowledgeable crappie fishermen throughout the U.S.,” noted Rick Patri, Fishhound’s vice president, operations. “These are bodies of water that earned well deserved reputations for producing big numbers of fish as well as some real monsters.” The long-standing IGFA all-tackle world record for white crappie stands at 5 lbs., 3 oz. – a fish caught in Mississippi back in 1957. The all-tackle record for black crappie is a 5-pound fish caught from a private Missouri farm pond in 2006. However, records are made to be broken. And, when larger crappie are caught, chances are those fish will come from a lake on Fishhound’s “Top 50” list below: Fishhound’s 50 Best Crappie Lakes List Grenada Lake, MS Sardis Lake, MS Kentucky Lake, TN Reelfoot Lake, TN Arkabutla Lake, MS Green River Lake, KY Lake Washington, MS Barkley Lake, KY Lake Dardanelle, AR Logan Martin, AL Weiss Lake, AL Nimrod Lake, AR Clarks Hill, GA Chickamauga Lake, TN Patoka Lake, IN Santee Cooper Lakes, SC Eufaula Lake, OK Pickwick Lake, TN Oologah Lake, OK Enid Lake, MS Harris Chain of Lakes, FL Truman Lake, MO Toledo Bend, TX Alabama River, AL Lake Erie, OH Texoma Lake, TX Buckeye Lake, TX Kaw Lake, OK Ross Barnett, MS Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, MS (Columbus, Aliceville, Aberdeen) Douglas Lake, TN Monroe Lake, FL Lake of the Ozarks, MO Lake Fork, TX Neely Henry Lake, AL Kinkaid Lake, IL Rend Lake, IL Shelbyville Lake, IL Conway Lake, AR Lake Greeson, AR Greenwood Lake, AR West Point, GA Oconee Lake, GA Lake Cumberland, KY Indian Lake, OH Lake Talquin, FL Mississinewa Lake, IN Hamilton Lake, AR Lake of the Pines, TX D’Arbonne Lake, LA Image courtesy Fishhound Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of Outdoor Hub. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their...

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