4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch

Published April 04, 2017

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Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life)

For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill…

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Outdoor Channel's Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017
FoxNews.com

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Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel)

Steve West …

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New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo

Published March 21, 2017

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 (iStock)

New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms.

According to a Bloomberg report, t…

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Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017
FoxNews.com

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More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock)

Think people are all about super luxurious getaway…

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Hunting

4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston Published May 01, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These tactics are for all the other times. The classic spring-morning turkey setup is classic for a reason: It works, at least some of the time. The birds are gathered in one spot—their roost tree—and they are usually vocal and callable. But every veteran turkey hunter knows that even a sure-thing flydown strut-buster can sputter and fail. Here are four ways to salvage what remains of your day. Tactic #1 Kill a Canyon Gobbler The toughest toms to tag can be those that hang out in vertical landscapes—the steep slopes of Western canyons or the corduroy country of Appalachia and the Northeast. Sometimes the terrain is so vertical, you can call a gobbler to 15 yards and still not see it. When you finally do, just his red head pops up, and the rest of the bird remains hidden by the hill. Canyon crossers are another challenge. A tom might roost on one side, fly down to the other, and climb the opposite rim to strut. In those cases, you may need to ford a creek and climb 500 feet to reach him. The best way to circumvent turkey troubles in vertical country is to look for terrain features that can help you get the drop on incoming gobblers. 1. Glass a Rim Strutter Gobblers will strut and preen in the woods and glades of canyon slopes, but often they hike up to the canyon rim and strut there, especially if it borders a pasture or crop field. You can watch for this from an elevated lookout. Use a good binocular and back it up with a spotting scope. In the West, we sometimes glass rim-edge turkeys from 2 or 3 miles away, usually from the opposite side of the canyon. Move in when you’ve identified a popular edge, either using the steep ridge to hide your approach from below or finding little creases and rivulets that can hide you if you need to drop in from above. 2. Locate Roosts Like turkeys everywhere, canyon toms have preferred roost sites—for a few nights in a row at least. Listen for gobbles in the evening or before dawn to pinpoint these places, then set up on the rim nearest the bird, uphill of the roost, and try calling him to you. 3. Deke the Bench Toms will walk and strut on steep ground, but they’re easier to see and shoot when they’re on flat ground. Most canyon walls will have a few meadows on benches or gentler south-facing...

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Outdoor Channel’s Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Outdoor Channel’s Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel) Steve West has finally completed his North American caribou hunt — and with a world-record bull. Three years ago, West, the host of “The Adventure Series” on Outdoor Channel, challenged himself to kill one bull from each of the five North American caribou species with just his CVA muzzleloader rifle. But even the avid hunter couldn’t have predicted how his most recent hunt would end. In 2013, he snagged the first of his five caribou: the Alaskan-Yukon Barren Ground. Over the next few years, he followed it up with a Central Canadian Barren Ground, a Mountain Caribou and a Quebec-Labrador, leaving only one species in his crosshairs: the Woodland Caribou of Newfoundland. MINNESOTA ‘BUTCHERS’ CHARGED IN STATES LARGEST TRAPPING BUST West’s search for a Woodland bull took such an incredible turn that he’s dedicating an upcoming episode of “The Adventure Series” to tell the tale. In October, West flew to Newfoundland, Canada, to meet up with Wayne Holloway, an expert hunter and guide at the Pine Ridge Lodge. Together, they began a days-long journey in search of the perfect bull. The two tracked caribou through the some rutting grounds near Clarenville, in the eastern part of the island, but West wasn’t in a rush to snag the first one he saw. “I was going to enjoy every day I was out there,” West told Fox News. “The reality is, I didn’t want (the trip) to end.” After days of in the wildreness, the duo finally spotted an ideal specimen perched on top of a hill. But when West approached and aimed his muzzleloader at the animals vitals, he noticed something was amiss. “My instincts told me that something was wrong,” West recalls on the show. “(The bull) had a broken leg and puncture wounds on his side, from fighting, and he was thin and very old,” he added. “I had two seconds to understand what I was seeing.” Ultimately, West decided to pull the trigger and take the animal down — a move that lined up with his beliefs as a conservationist. “The conversationist in me overcame any other insticts that I had,” West told Fox News. “(The caribou) was done. He was at the end of natural life. In a split second, I said to myself,’ I have to take this caribou.'” “I couldn’t let him run off in that condition,” West added in a press release. GREAT WHITE CIRCLES MAUI FISHERMAN FOR OVER AN HOUR Conservationists in Newfoundland will likely agree. According to wildlife biologist Shane Mahoney, the caribou in Newfoundland...

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Coyote Nation: A crash course in coyote hunting

Coyote Nation: A crash course in coyote hunting

By Tom Carpenter Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Next Ever adaptable and always elusive, Canis latrans thrives in varied landscapes across the country. Whether you’re working on your hundredth coyote or dreaming about dropping your first, our complete guide shows you how to hunt down success this winter It used to be that when small-game, upland bird, waterfowl, and big-game seasons ended, a hunter finally had a chance to pull up an easy chair next to a cozy fire, rest up, and reflect on an autumn well spent. Ditch that notion. Winter is time to hunt the hunter. Coyotes are out there waiting in habitat near you, and all you have to do is go after them to experience some of hunting’s knee-shakingest thrills. While the basics of coyote hunting are simple—set up with visibility and minimize movement; keep the wind in your face or crossing; call in dogs by appealing to their stomach, territoriality, or libido—success hinges on the details. It pays to match your approach to the habitat, and assemble your gear with meticulous care. Easy chairs are for old farts. Get out there now where the air is clean and the coyotes roam. RELATED: 10 Myths About Blood Trailing Deer BIG-TIMBER YAPPERS Coyotes in forested areas are spread out and challenging to find. But there are ways to locate them and bring them in. Strategies Though traditionally thought of as creatures of the wide-open West, coyotes have moved into timber country in untold numbers in recent years. The challenges of hunting expansive woods are clear: The cover never ends, and the calling noises you make will only reach so far. Here are three solutions. In flat country, search out clear-cuts, meadows, loggers’ landings, marsh edges, cover seams, and other openings, and set up there. You’ll gain much-needed visibility, your calls will carry farther, and you’ll be where the coyotes are—that combination of clearings, transition zones, and thick cover where prey (including cottontails, mice, voles, and moles) reside. In hill country, head for hollows, gullies, valleys, draws, washes, and other terrain that lets you set up on one side and survey the opposite slope for approaching varmints. In big timber habitat, set up often, call loudly, and wait a short time (15 to 20 minutes, with three to five distress calling sequences in there), then move on. Covering ground, and lots of it, is the way to find a coyote that will hear you; the dogs have many places to be, and call sounds do not carry far. There’s another secret to shooting coyotes where the cover sprawls on forever: Scout hard. Here are three effective approaches. Spend a starlit winter evening out in...

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Big Buck alert: Missouri 11-year-old tags 178-inch monster on first hunt

Big Buck alert: Missouri 11-year-old tags 178-inch monster on first hunt

By Kris Millgate Published November 03, 2016 Facebook Twitter Email Print An 11-year-old’s first hunt may be one for the record books. Jenna Perryman of Springfield, Mo, shot a 200-pound, 15-point typical whitetail that green scored 178 inches. After a mandatory 60-day drying period, it will, in all likelihood, clear the 160-inch minimum score to be eligible for the Boone & Crockett Club record books. Why the First Two Hours of Daylight Produce the Most Fall Bronze Jenna shot the deer while afield with her father, David, during Missouri’s youth opening weekend, which ran from Oct. 29 to Oct. 30. Jenna and her dad had hunted most of the day, and as the sun began to set, he spotted a doe about 50 yards away. As Jenna prepared to shoot, David noticed a buck behind the doe and stopped her. “It didn’t look as big when it was that far away,” Jenna told the Springfield News-Leader, “but then when I saw it, I was like, ‘Whoa! Did I do that?'” Not doing what you’re supposed to do can pay off with a filled tag According to Justin Spring, Boone & Crockett Club big-game records director, a mere 474 of the millions of Missouri deer that have been tagged over the years have made the club’s record book. “Even if hers doesn’t make it in, that’s still a buck of a lifetime for anyone, let alone an 11-year-old,” he told the paper. Jenna says she is having the rack mounted and the meat turned into summer sausage and jerky. Midwest Rut Report: Ohio Bucks Are on the...

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How to find deer in bad winter weather

How to find deer in bad winter weather

By Gerald Almy Published November 01, 2016 Facebook Twitter Email Print Next Extreme Success It’s no secret that food sources can be hotspots right after a snowstorm. But dealing with the varied weather extremes Mother Nature can dish out during the tag end of the season can be a lot more complicated. If you’ve booked time off or only have weekends free, you can’t wait for perfect weather. You need to adapt both where you hunt and your strategy to whitetails’ weather-influenced movement patterns. Here’s a guide to hunting tactics for eight extreme late-season weather conditions. Opening day has its draws, but there’s nothing quite like a late-season pheasant hunt 1. Heavy Snowfall/Blizzard You have three options here: • Hunt before it hits. Deer know when storms are coming, and they feed heavily six to 18 hours before heavy snows set in. Leave work early, take a day off, call in sick—do whatever it takes to be on a current food source before the storm hits. Orchards, food plots, oak flats that still have acorns, and fields of soybean, wheat, and radish can all be productive pre-storm stakeouts. In high-pressure areas, check out secondary foods like raspberry, honeysuckle, greenbrier, and plum thickets. • Hunt mid-storm. Put on tall boots or gaiters, wool, and waterproof outer clothing. Look for bucks hunkered down in sheltered areas, such as conifer thickets, brush, and blowdowns. Pinpoint this cover on the lee side of mountains and hills, on benches, or even in valleys where deer can find some escape from the worst of the storm. Still-hunt carefully along the edges. • Hunt post-storm. Find the best remaining food sources and take a stand downwind. Deer will be moving. They have to be—survival demands they get food after being holed up, sometimes for days. How to Skin Rabbits and Squirrels 2. Ice and Sleet These can be even worse for deer than snow because the precipitation penetrates their coats instead of building up an insulating cover on it. Bucks seldom move well just before ice events, as these typically follow low-barometer periods (which are poor for movement) and often start as cold, chilling rain. Focus on the same spots outlined above for snowstorms. Finding evergreens is vital for deer now, since deciduous trees and brush offer virtually no protection. Bucks will be concentrated, so drive 1- to 5-acre pockets of evergreens. Have two flankers work the outer edge slightly ahead of a single hunter who zigzags up the middle of the conifers. Post other hunters at the end, or along ditches and side strips of cover that offer escape routes. 3. Light Snowfall Bucks move well in light snow, often seeking a late-cycling doe or...

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14-year-old hunter survives night in 4-degree weather after becoming separated from friend

14-year-old hunter survives night in 4-degree weather after becoming separated from friend

Published December 27, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook1212 Twitter0 livefyre140 Email Print A 14-year-old boy who became separated from a friend on a northern Utah hunting trip was found safe Sunday after spending the night in 4-degree weather. The boy was taken to the hospital after he called 911 from a landline just before 6 a.m. Sunday at the Anteploe Island Causeway in Syracuse, Fox 13 in Salt Lake City reports. “The juvenile had somehow made his way to that location and was calling for help,” the Weber County Sheriff’s Office said in a new release. “It was reported he appeared confused and was somewhat delusional.” His condition is unknown at this time, the station reported. The boy and his friend had gone hunting in the marshes of Ogden Bay in Hooper around 2 a.m. Saturday. Around 9 p.m. Saturday the friend notified authorities that they had become separated. As searchers arrived on the scene the missing boy called 911 a couple of times on his cellphone but it appeared he was disoriented, the sheriff’s office said. Several agencies responded to assist in the search for the boy, Fox 13 reported. Click here for more from Fox 13. Originally available...

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