Airlines experimenting with kid-free zones on planes

By Cailey Rizzo | Travel + Leisure

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A few airlines have instituted no-children-allowed policies in certain areas of the plane.  (iStock)

Last m…

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Everything you can get for free at the airport

By Andrea Romano | Travel + Leisure

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iStock  (Did you know you can do yoga at the airport? Here’s everything you can do for free on your next long layov…

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Airline reveals which windows seats you should always avoid

news.com.au

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If you want a spot with a view, be sure to avoid these window seats.  (iStock)

How many times have you boarded a plane and arrived …

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Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock) Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeking one last look at the nation’s best fall foliage. America offers plenty of beautiful locations for marveling at the changing colors of the season, whether you’re up north, down south, or even out west. So bundle up, grab some apples and get outside to leaf-peep away at nature’s dazzling display. The closer we get to winter, however, certain parks, attractions and locations may close, so be sure to double-check before your head out. NORTHEAST Acadia National Park, Maine Visit the beautiful Acadia National Park and scale Cadillac Mountain, the tallest mountain in the park and the tallest along the eastern American coast. Not only is this a prime place to view the sunrise, but the 27-mile Park Loop Road system that winds around the mountain offers views of the coastal forests and shoreline. Peak season for leaf-peeping is generally in mid-October, but the state has a fall foliage website that’s updated weekly, so you can determine the best time to visit. After you’ve had your fill of fall colors, head to the coastal town of Bar Harbor, full of history, shops and delicious restaurants. The Catskills, New York The Catskills are lovely in the autumn. View fall foliage in the great outdoors, or take a hikeon one of the popular hiking trails in the Catskill Mountains. The area is also great for a scenic drive where you can see the historic covered bridges that date back to the 1800s. Be sure to see the many waterfalls in the region as well, with Kaaterskill Falls being the tallest cascading waterfall in New York State. A fall foliage report for the state can be viewed here. BEST TRANSITIONAL JACKETS FOR FALL Pocono Mountains, Pennsylvania For amazing leaf-peeping and a good time, head to the Pocono Mountains. Consult the fall foliage forecast before you plan your trip, and if you want to be extra sure the leaves are at optimal color, check out their live cameras. Visitors can take a scenic train ride or trail ride through the region or even an air tour to see the changing foliage. (You know you are going to a superb area for leaf peeping when they have a leaf peeping FAQ available.) Mount Washington, New Hampshire Mount Washington State Park sits atop the summit of the highest peak in the Northeast. The area offers expansive views of up to 130-miles on a clear day, surrounded by the 750,000-acre White Mountain National Forest. If you are not looking to hike up the mountain, there is a scenic overlook with vehicle access. Note that the park (summit building) is closed from November to April. But another way...

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch Published April 04, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life) For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill is a great approach. This cooking method consists of a rack of fresh live sticks or branches, set up with a fire underneath. This grill acts very much like a metal cooking grill, and you may be able to get several uses out of your sticks before they begin to burn. These sticks can be supported in different ways, and you can build the grill in any size or shape that you like. Square, rectangular and triangular shapes are popular, and these can range in size from tiny to huge. I have built several massive grills over the years, the largest of which held enough food to feed 70 people. READ: 15 CRAZY CAMPING AND SURVIVAL HACKS To build your own, an easily adaptable construction method involves stakes or small posts that are driven into the ground to hold the rack. Cut four stakes, 1 yard long, each with a side branch at the end. Whittle a point on the end that doesn’t fork, and drive these into the ground about 8-10 inches. Set two stout green-wood poles — green wood being freshly cut wood that hasn’t dried out — in the forks, and lay a rack of green sticks perpendicular to the poles. Maintain a nice bed of coals and low flames to grill your meats and vegetables to perfection. I love roasting sweet corn this way, just as people have for centuries. And if you’re looking for a grill with greater stability, try a tripod grill. Lash three crosspieces to the outside of a large tripod and then lay your green-wood rack on top of the cross members. Use vines, rawhide strips or leather thongs to lash the crosspieces since there will be a fire nearby — synthetic rope may melt and natural fiber rope may burn this close to the flames. If either one yields to the fire, your rack and your food will drop into the flames. 3 TIPS FOR FINDING BETTER TINDER IN THE FIELD I’ve learned a lot about green-wood grills over the years, mostly from accidents and mistakes. Now you can take advantage of that experience and save yourself some trouble. When cooking with this grill, it’s best to: 1. Have a good bed of coals fed with hardwoods if possible. 2. Watch where the smoke goes. This shows you where your heat is going, and place your food accordingly. Place it in the smoke for more heat, near the smoke for less heat. 3. Prop up flat stones against the...

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Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

By David E. Petzal Published March 17, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Sweetfire matches  (Field & Stream/UCO Gear) Survival, at the 2017 Shot Show, was very, very big. Why you’d want to survive was never spelled out, but there was no shortage of stuff designed to get you through the Wrath to Come. The problem is that very often, the Wrath to Come does not take the form of a nuclear exchange with North Korea, or currency collapse, or meteor strike, or any of the really dramatic stuff. Sometimes it takes the most mundane forms. In Newfield, Maine, on February 3, a 34-year-old named John Sciaba, described as an experienced outdoorsman, was seen in the woods behind his house where he liked to camp overnight. He was not seen again. Shortly after the search for him began, a series of six heavy snowstorms set in, making it impossible for tracking dogs to track or for drones to go up in the air. When the snow finally stops, any traces of him will have been obliterated. It does not look good. RELATED: THE ELEMENTS OF A PERFECT FIRE This brings us to fire. Very often, if you can start a fire, it will save you. Not only will you not freeze to death, but a fire can be seen for miles at night, and a deliberately smoky fire can get up through the tree canopy that a drone can’t see through. Making a fire is much more difficult than you imagine, unless you’ve tried doing it. Watching “The Revenant,” I get a kick out Leo DiCaprio body-surfing 5 miles down a freezing Class 3 rapids, washing up on shore, giving a very small tinder ball a few whacks with the old flint and steel, and instantly creating a roaring blaze by which he can meditate on his chances for an Oscar. Granted, in real life, trappers and Native Americans were very good at starting fires*, but even so… A more typical example is available at a club I belong to, which tests the skills of its members in a series of wilderness-skills events, one of which is called the Water Boil. You’re given a chunk of pine log, a pot with a quart of water, a hatchet that is purposely kept dull**, three strike-anywhere matches, a small stone on which to strike the matches, and 11 minutes*** in which to build a fire and bring the water to a rolling boil. You’re usually surrounded by club members who offer their opinions on your manual dexterity, chances of succeeding, technique, and manhood in general. If you screw up in any phase, you flunk, amidst the joyful hoots, jeers and catcalls...

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The Best Travel Cards in March

The Best Travel Cards in March

By Jordan Wathen Published March 19, 2017 Markets Fool.comOpens a New Window. Facebook Twitter Print The average domestic plane ticket in the United States cost $349 last year, but many people paid nothing at all. Those who use travel cards wisely earn free flights, hotel stays, and car rentals all around the world just with a simple change to their spending habits. Below we’ve assembled a list of travel rewards that meet the needs of any responsible credit card user. If you’re the type to pay your cards off in full each month, and won’t spend frivolously just to earn rewards, these three travel cards could help you plan your next vacation on the card companies’ dime. Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard TheBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard Opens a New Window.is a top choice because it offers a blend that includes a high rewards rate, a beefy sign-up bonus, and flexible redemptions. Cardholders enjoy 2 miles per dollar spent (effectively a 2% rewards rate), and can redeem their miles for travel purchased through third-parties for statement credits. That means you can book a trip on Priceline or another service and use your miles to pay for it. More From Fool.com Motley Fool Founders Issue New Stock Buy Alert Forget GE! Heres how to play the largest growth opportunity in history Forget Apple! Heres a Better Stock to Buy He Made 21,078% Buying Amazon. Heres His New Pick One cool feature is that theBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard actually encourages you to redeem your miles. The card awards a 5% bonus when you redeem your miles, thus a cardholder would receive 2,500 miles back after redeeming 50,000 miles for a trip, for example. The only downside is that this card carries an annual fee like many other top-shelf travel cards. Cardholders pay an annual fee of $89, which is waived for the first year. But in exchange for the annual fee, the card offers a lucrative 2.1% rewards rate plus a sign-up bonus of 50,000 miles for people who spend at least $3,000 in the first 90 days. That’s one of the best sign-up bonuses in travel cards Opens a New Window., worth about $525 when the 5% redemption bonus is added on top.(Read ourfull review Opens a New Window.of theBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard.) Traveling is more fun when the card company is paying for it. Image source: Getty Images. Chase Sapphire Reserve TheChase Sapphire Reserve Opens a New Window.became an overnight success with would-be travel hackers and people who love the game of credit card rewards. This card isn’t for everyone, as using its high-powered sign-up bonus to your advantage requires that you pay...

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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