The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

Fox News

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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Tips

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch Published April 04, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life) For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill is a great approach. This cooking method consists of a rack of fresh live sticks or branches, set up with a fire underneath. This grill acts very much like a metal cooking grill, and you may be able to get several uses out of your sticks before they begin to burn. These sticks can be supported in different ways, and you can build the grill in any size or shape that you like. Square, rectangular and triangular shapes are popular, and these can range in size from tiny to huge. I have built several massive grills over the years, the largest of which held enough food to feed 70 people. READ: 15 CRAZY CAMPING AND SURVIVAL HACKS To build your own, an easily adaptable construction method involves stakes or small posts that are driven into the ground to hold the rack. Cut four stakes, 1 yard long, each with a side branch at the end. Whittle a point on the end that doesn’t fork, and drive these into the ground about 8-10 inches. Set two stout green-wood poles — green wood being freshly cut wood that hasn’t dried out — in the forks, and lay a rack of green sticks perpendicular to the poles. Maintain a nice bed of coals and low flames to grill your meats and vegetables to perfection. I love roasting sweet corn this way, just as people have for centuries. And if you’re looking for a grill with greater stability, try a tripod grill. Lash three crosspieces to the outside of a large tripod and then lay your green-wood rack on top of the cross members. Use vines, rawhide strips or leather thongs to lash the crosspieces since there will be a fire nearby — synthetic rope may melt and natural fiber rope may burn this close to the flames. If either one yields to the fire, your rack and your food will drop into the flames. 3 TIPS FOR FINDING BETTER TINDER IN THE FIELD I’ve learned a lot about green-wood grills over the years, mostly from accidents and mistakes. Now you can take advantage of that experience and save yourself some trouble. When cooking with this grill, it’s best to: 1. Have a good bed of coals fed with hardwoods if possible. 2. Watch where the smoke goes. This shows you where your heat is going, and place your food accordingly. Place it in the smoke for more heat, near the smoke for less heat. 3. Prop up flat stones against the...

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Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

Fire starters for camping and survival: Two new, useful products

By David E. Petzal Published March 17, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Sweetfire matches  (Field & Stream/UCO Gear) Survival, at the 2017 Shot Show, was very, very big. Why you’d want to survive was never spelled out, but there was no shortage of stuff designed to get you through the Wrath to Come. The problem is that very often, the Wrath to Come does not take the form of a nuclear exchange with North Korea, or currency collapse, or meteor strike, or any of the really dramatic stuff. Sometimes it takes the most mundane forms. In Newfield, Maine, on February 3, a 34-year-old named John Sciaba, described as an experienced outdoorsman, was seen in the woods behind his house where he liked to camp overnight. He was not seen again. Shortly after the search for him began, a series of six heavy snowstorms set in, making it impossible for tracking dogs to track or for drones to go up in the air. When the snow finally stops, any traces of him will have been obliterated. It does not look good. RELATED: THE ELEMENTS OF A PERFECT FIRE This brings us to fire. Very often, if you can start a fire, it will save you. Not only will you not freeze to death, but a fire can be seen for miles at night, and a deliberately smoky fire can get up through the tree canopy that a drone can’t see through. Making a fire is much more difficult than you imagine, unless you’ve tried doing it. Watching “The Revenant,” I get a kick out Leo DiCaprio body-surfing 5 miles down a freezing Class 3 rapids, washing up on shore, giving a very small tinder ball a few whacks with the old flint and steel, and instantly creating a roaring blaze by which he can meditate on his chances for an Oscar. Granted, in real life, trappers and Native Americans were very good at starting fires*, but even so… A more typical example is available at a club I belong to, which tests the skills of its members in a series of wilderness-skills events, one of which is called the Water Boil. You’re given a chunk of pine log, a pot with a quart of water, a hatchet that is purposely kept dull**, three strike-anywhere matches, a small stone on which to strike the matches, and 11 minutes*** in which to build a fire and bring the water to a rolling boil. You’re usually surrounded by club members who offer their opinions on your manual dexterity, chances of succeeding, technique, and manhood in general. If you screw up in any phase, you flunk, amidst the joyful hoots, jeers and catcalls...

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The Best Travel Cards in March

The Best Travel Cards in March

By Jordan Wathen Published March 19, 2017 Markets Fool.comOpens a New Window. Facebook Twitter Print The average domestic plane ticket in the United States cost $349 last year, but many people paid nothing at all. Those who use travel cards wisely earn free flights, hotel stays, and car rentals all around the world just with a simple change to their spending habits. Below we’ve assembled a list of travel rewards that meet the needs of any responsible credit card user. If you’re the type to pay your cards off in full each month, and won’t spend frivolously just to earn rewards, these three travel cards could help you plan your next vacation on the card companies’ dime. Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard TheBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard Opens a New Window.is a top choice because it offers a blend that includes a high rewards rate, a beefy sign-up bonus, and flexible redemptions. Cardholders enjoy 2 miles per dollar spent (effectively a 2% rewards rate), and can redeem their miles for travel purchased through third-parties for statement credits. That means you can book a trip on Priceline or another service and use your miles to pay for it. More From Fool.com Motley Fool Founders Issue New Stock Buy Alert Forget GE! Heres how to play the largest growth opportunity in history Forget Apple! Heres a Better Stock to Buy He Made 21,078% Buying Amazon. Heres His New Pick One cool feature is that theBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard actually encourages you to redeem your miles. The card awards a 5% bonus when you redeem your miles, thus a cardholder would receive 2,500 miles back after redeeming 50,000 miles for a trip, for example. The only downside is that this card carries an annual fee like many other top-shelf travel cards. Cardholders pay an annual fee of $89, which is waived for the first year. But in exchange for the annual fee, the card offers a lucrative 2.1% rewards rate plus a sign-up bonus of 50,000 miles for people who spend at least $3,000 in the first 90 days. That’s one of the best sign-up bonuses in travel cards Opens a New Window., worth about $525 when the 5% redemption bonus is added on top.(Read ourfull review Opens a New Window.of theBarclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard.) Traveling is more fun when the card company is paying for it. Image source: Getty Images. Chase Sapphire Reserve TheChase Sapphire Reserve Opens a New Window.became an overnight success with would-be travel hackers and people who love the game of credit card rewards. This card isn’t for everyone, as using its high-powered sign-up bonus to your advantage requires that you pay...

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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Are these the world’s dumbest tourists?

Are these the world’s dumbest tourists?

Published September 08, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook103 Twitter218 livefyre293 Email Print A tourist learns the hard way not to get too close to the wildlife. (YouTube) Sometimes people don’t think when they’re traveling. Whether it’s being downright disrespectful of historical monuments, goading wild animals or offending locals, we’ve rounded up some of the stupidest things we’ve seen travelers do. 1. Tourist carves name in wall at the Alamo  AP Photo People in the Lone Star State won’t soon forget Julio Perez, 22, who wanted to leave a parting gift to Texas’ enduring shrine of freedom.  Perez was arrested after being accused of taking his car keys and carving his name into a wall inside the Alamo Church. Alamo Rangers say a tour guide inside the church caught him in the act. Police said that the carving was of the suspect’s name, “Julio,” and that it measured about 3 inches by 1 inch –which officials estimate to have caused about $250,000 in damage. 2. Tourist bitten after trying to pet a wild animal Need another reminder that wild animals aren’t pets? This tourist to the Grand Canyon does after trying to stroke  — of all exotic creatures — a squirrel.  Even more astonishing is that he captured the incident on video.  He’s heard luring the bushy-tailed creature over with the promise of food amid the oohs and aahs of onlookers, only to piss the animal off when he had nothing to nibble on.  The squirrel ran off, but not before posing for pictures taken by a gaggle of tourists snapping away.  Squirrels, which are a regular sight at the Grand Canyon, are used to humans and park rangers are constantly reminding visitors mot to touch or feed them. 3. Americans deface Rome’s Colosseum. AP Photo In March, two Californians were caught carving their initials into the ancient amphitheater walls.  Police apprehended two women but not after they had successfully carved the letters “J” and “N” into the stone and taken a selfie. They were charged with “aggravated damage to a building of historical and artistic interest.” 4. Safari guide charges bull elephant on foot. Most tour guides encourage travelers to be respectful of local wildlife and animals. But a safari guide in a South African game park made headlines aftercharging a bull elephant on foot while his colleagues egged him on and laughed. Though the elephant was uninjured during the incident and eventually walked away, the safari guide in the video was fired by the company. 5. Chinese teen carved name into ancient Egyptian temple AP Photo Last spring, a Chinese teenager was caught defacing a temple wall in the city of Luxor, Egypt. The brazen young tourist wrote “Ding Jinhao visited here”...

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