Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Are these the world’s dumbest tourists?

Are these the world’s dumbest tourists?

Published September 08, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook103 Twitter218 livefyre293 Email Print A tourist learns the hard way not to get too close to the wildlife. (YouTube) Sometimes people don’t think when they’re traveling. Whether it’s being downright disrespectful of historical monuments, goading wild animals or offending locals, we’ve rounded up some of the stupidest things we’ve seen travelers do. 1. Tourist carves name in wall at the Alamo  AP Photo People in the Lone Star State won’t soon forget Julio Perez, 22, who wanted to leave a parting gift to Texas’ enduring shrine of freedom.  Perez was arrested after being accused of taking his car keys and carving his name into a wall inside the Alamo Church. Alamo Rangers say a tour guide inside the church caught him in the act. Police said that the carving was of the suspect’s name, “Julio,” and that it measured about 3 inches by 1 inch –which officials estimate to have caused about $250,000 in damage. 2. Tourist bitten after trying to pet a wild animal Need another reminder that wild animals aren’t pets? This tourist to the Grand Canyon does after trying to stroke  — of all exotic creatures — a squirrel.  Even more astonishing is that he captured the incident on video.  He’s heard luring the bushy-tailed creature over with the promise of food amid the oohs and aahs of onlookers, only to piss the animal off when he had nothing to nibble on.  The squirrel ran off, but not before posing for pictures taken by a gaggle of tourists snapping away.  Squirrels, which are a regular sight at the Grand Canyon, are used to humans and park rangers are constantly reminding visitors mot to touch or feed them. 3. Americans deface Rome’s Colosseum. AP Photo In March, two Californians were caught carving their initials into the ancient amphitheater walls.  Police apprehended two women but not after they had successfully carved the letters “J” and “N” into the stone and taken a selfie. They were charged with “aggravated damage to a building of historical and artistic interest.” 4. Safari guide charges bull elephant on foot. Most tour guides encourage travelers to be respectful of local wildlife and animals. But a safari guide in a South African game park made headlines aftercharging a bull elephant on foot while his colleagues egged him on and laughed. Though the elephant was uninjured during the incident and eventually walked away, the safari guide in the video was fired by the company. 5. Chinese teen carved name into ancient Egyptian temple AP Photo Last spring, a Chinese teenager was caught defacing a temple wall in the city of Luxor, Egypt. The brazen young tourist wrote “Ding Jinhao visited here”...

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Tourist spotted having bath in Venice canal sparks outrage

Tourist spotted having bath in Venice canal sparks outrage

Published August 19, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook64 Twitter172 livefyre118 Email Print Venice draws about 25 million visitors a year. But, with the hordes of travelers that take over the city, especially in the summer, not all are on their best behavior. (YouTube) Italian media is blasting a tourist after he was spotted having a bath in one of Venice’s famed canals. Footage shows the man up to his chest in the water, splashing around and using the water to clean his armpits, shoulders and back. The video, recorded by someone on the other side of the canal, was supplied to local newspaper Il Gazzettino, which said the footage had been uploaded to Facebook. Venice has long been a popular tourist destination that draws about 25 million visitors a year. But, with the hordes of travelers that take over the city, especially in the summer,  not all are on their best behavior. Visitors have also been photographed peeing in a canal, showering naked behind a RV or seen diving from the city landmark, the Constitution Bridge. This latest scene has sparked outrage and calls for a crackdown on visitors behaving badly.  But it’s not just Venice that has had its share of bizarre acts.  Tourists to Rome made headlines recently for carving their names or initials into the Colosseum and another teenager stole ceiling tiles at Pompeii to buy an iPhone. Venice’s tourism councilor complained that the massive amount of tourists on the streets make walking the streets seem like touring a museum, tourism councilor Paola Mar told the Local Tuesday. “The city doesn’t have to become a museum,” Mar said. “We have to find a way for the residents to live with the tourists.” Originally available...

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British tourist lost in Australia saves himself with beach S.O.S.

British tourist lost in Australia saves himself with beach S.O.S.

Published August 23, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook401 Twitter574 livefyre457 Email Print Barefoot, hungry and alone, a 63-year-old British tourist saved himself by scrawling a desperate message in the sand. Geoff Keys was rescued after two days in the Australian outback when a search helicopter spotted his “HELP” message on the beach in late July, Sky Newsreported. The retired mechanic was attempting a shortcut back to camp in the 900-square-mile Jardine National Park in north Queensland when he got off track, leading him to endure a tough ordeal without food, water or shelter. Wearing just a T-shirt, swimming trunks and a hat, he wandered directionless, until Keys heard helicopters overhead, ostensibly searching for him. “I feel stupid, but lucky” – Geoff Keys “It meant that I had been reported missing by my friend and also brought home to me what a terrible night they must have had, wondering where I was,” Keyswrote on his blog. So Keys made his way to a sandy embankment and wrote “HELP” — with an arrow pointing to where he was resting. After another night alone, a chopper spotted the message and then began searching for the weary survivor. Keys said when he saw the helicopter he tried attracting its attention by waving his hat, hoping the crew would notice him. “[The helicopter] came around again while I continued to jump up and down like a lunatic and this time someone waved to me out of the window,” Keys wrote. “My ordeal was over.” The fatigued adventurer, who was later treated for exhaustion, dehydration and cuts on his feet, had to be hoisted into the helicopter from the water. Police say the rescue cost $800,000. “It’s safe to say that I’m very grateful to everyone involved in my rescue,” Keys wrote. “Their skill and professionalism is incredible.” He added: “I feel stupid, but lucky.”   Originally available...

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Flora and Fauna Hiking Guide

Flora and Fauna Hiking Guide

There are few more spectacular and humbling experiences than being at one with nature, miles from civilization, with nothing but the flora and fauna that surrounds you as company. It’s this oneness with nature that draws hikers onto trails for remote, days-long hikes. Nature lovers will challenge themselves against the elements; surviving on the bounties of Mother Nature and their own wits. This kind of outdoor adventure can go awry very quickly, however, if your knowledge of the native plants and animals in a given area falls short. A basic knowledge of all animal tracks in the area is key. If you’re a hunter, you’ll understand the benefits of knowing your prey’s footprints by heart, as this will allow you to track and find your meal with far more ease. It’s equally important to be able to identify predator tracks, too, so you can avoid becoming the hunted one. Sharing a hiking trail with a pack of coyotes is not recommended. America is home to a number of fruits and berries that can sustain a hungry traveler through weeks of survivalist camping. However, there are also a number of berries and plants that should be avoided at all costs. Understanding the difference between edible and inedible plants is as easy as checking our guide to common poisonous and safe berries and plants below. If you’re unsure or unable to identify a plant, best practice is to avoid eating it. Also keep an eye out for a variety of plants that can cause irritation or illness through mere contact. Knowing what these plants look like from a distance will allow you to avoid coming into contact with them. Once you’re equipped with the knowledge to stay safe around flora and fauna while hiking, you’ll appreciate them, and the overall hiking experience, that much more. PUBLISHED ON May 12, 2015 RELATED ARTICLES Stuck on Survival A roll of duct tape could save your life, or at the very least, help you out of a tig… How Not to Get Lost While Hiking Prepare for your next hike by bringing items that will help if you get lost. Read on …   Originally posted here :...

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Elderly Yellowstone tourist cheats death after trying to snap photo

Elderly Yellowstone tourist cheats death after trying to snap photo

Published May 20, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook31 Twitter166 Email Print A view of Yellowstone National Park. (AP Photo) Rangers in Yellowstone National Park have rescued a New York tourist who stumbled backward into a canyon while trying to take a picture. A statement released Monday says the 71-year-old man tumbled about 25 feet on May 10 before he stopped his fall by bracing his body and feet against a small crevice in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. “According to staff on scene, the man was extremely lucky,” park officials reported. “The crevice and the angle of his body during the fall helped the man stop at the top of a 200 foot drop. A fall just inches to the left may have resulted in a fatality as the canyon wall is mostly steep loose rock.” Two park rangers threw the man a rope that they secured to a tree and a sign. A park rescue team then pulled the man back to the rim using ropes and pulleys. Related The man, whose name has not been released, was hospitalized and treated for a possible hip injury.     Originally posted here :...

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Hiker killed after cliff collapses along northern California trail

Hiker killed after cliff collapses along northern California trail

Published March 23, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook164 Twitter334 Email Print March 22, 2015: This photo provided by Point Reyes National Seashore shows a rockslide at Arch Rock within Point Reyes National Seashore on the Northern California coast north of San Francisco. (AP Photo/Point Reyes National Seashore) One hiker was killed and another was injured after a sandstone bluff along a popular northern California hiking trail gave way late Saturday. The collapse happened shortly before 6 p.m. local time at the Arch Rock lookout point at Point Reyes National Seashore, northwest of San Francisco. National Park Service spokesman John Dell’Osso told the San Francisco ChronicleSunday that the hikers had embarked on an 8.2-mile hike along the Bear Valley Trail to the overlook. The pair fell about 70 feet and were covered with rocks and debris before being freed by passers-by. One of the hikers was pronounced dead at the scene, while the other was airlifted to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries. No identifying information was released about either hiker. The National Park Service had posted signs at the site two days earlier warning hikers that a fissure along the top of Arch Rock may have weakened the cliff and that walking along the edge was dangerous. However, witnesses said that didn’t stop many from climbing up to the overlook. Hiker Karen Blasing told the Chronicle she saw dozens of people on the bluff despite the risk. “It was clear no one should be on that rock with the huge fissure,” she told the paper. “We stayed back, but many others were unconcerned and dangerously taking chances.” Officials later closed that area of the trail completely. “We just put up warning signs this past Thursday and Friday,” Dell’Osso told theLos Angeles Times in an interview. “I can’t tell you why somebody would walk past those signs and not pay any attention to them. “Obviously there is a tragedy and one person didn’t survive, but one person did and hopefully this won’t happen again,” he told the...

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