How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch

Published April 04, 2017

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Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life)

For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill…

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Outdoor Channel's Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017
FoxNews.com

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Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel)

Steve West …

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New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo

Published March 21, 2017

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 (iStock)

New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms.

According to a Bloomberg report, t…

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Travel Destinations

New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo Published March 21, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (iStock) New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms. According to a Bloomberg report, the number of tourists visiting New Zealand is much higher than what the country predicted just a few years ago. Because of this unforeseen rapid growth, hotels across the country are selling out rooms. The same Bloomberg report featured a story on a group of 53 elderly American tourists who were forced to spend the night in a traditional Maori meeting house when their flight home from Auckland was canceled. All the hotel rooms in the city were fully booked. Last year, 3.5 million people visited New Zealand. By 2022, that number is expected to reach an annual 4.5 million — almost matching the country’s population of 4.7 million people. More from Travel + Leisure 20 Trips to Take in Your Twenties The Best Views in Every State 13 Places Where You Can See the Bluest Water in the World The Best Places to Travel in 2017 The Cheapest Places to Travel for Each Month of the Year As the country’s tourism numbers continue to grow, many are considering alternative forms of accommodation. While some may choose to stay in something like the Maori meeting house (with little more than a mattress on the floor), others turn to Airbnb. Accodring to data from AirDNA, there are 1,401 active Airbnb listings in the capital of Auckland. In Wellington, that number is 1,488. According to an accommodation survey by the New Zealand government, there are 3,089 establishments in total, providing 138,593 places for tourists to stay throughout the country. Hotel occupancy is at about 86 percent throughout the year. Plans have already been laid for the construction of an additional 5,200 hotel rooms throughout the country, but government research still predicts a hotel room shortage of about 4,500 by 2025. Increased tourism numbers are doing more than just selling out hotel rooms, though. New Zealand tourism authorities warn that higher numbers of visitors are contributing to environmental stress, clogging sewerage systems in small towns, and eroding trailways in many of the country’s natural...

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5 insane parks to enjoy RV camping

5 insane parks to enjoy RV camping

Published March 07, 2017 Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (Pixaby) If you love nature, then you just can’t beat getting out in the woods, from the smell of fresh pine and a smoking fire to sleeping under the stars. But sometimes even nature lovers don’t really want to rough it. Make it a more comfortable adventure by having a little house on wheels. All you have to do is park at a campsite and enjoy everything that RV camping has to offer. With a recreational vehicle, you combine endless outside pleasures with inside comfort, and you’ll be equipped with all the amenities you need for an adventurous trip. Going on a road trip is a vacation everyone should take at least once in their lives. Why not extend the good times by a few more days or even weeks? RV camping means you can live in relative luxury almost anywhere. Give in to the lure of the open road– the kids will love the experience, too. But it’s important to choose your campground wisely. Some are quite rustic and offer few amenities other than a place to park; while others have electric hookups, water, and even free WiFi. (Because you don’t have to sleep in a tent on the hard ground to reconnect with nature.) Luckily, you have plenty of options — there are more than 16,000 campgrounds across the U.S., according to GoRVing. So be an intrepid wanderer and discover the country in an RV. 1. Crater Lake National Park, Oregon Thinkstock The breathtaking views make this park a very desirable camping location. The Mazama Campground offers sites from just $31, according to NPS. A few of the RV sites have electric hookups, and they cost $35. There are many pull-through sites, too. Each one has a picnic table, fire ring, and food locker. Black bears are rarely seen. The campground has drinking water, flush toilets, showers, and even laundry facilities. 2. Hunting Island State Park, South Carolina Thinkstock Camping is available at the northern end of the park near the ocean, according to South Carolina Parks. You’ll have access to some of the prettiest beaches in the state. As the name suggests, the park has an abundance of wildlife, which adds to its natural splendor. You can park under trees and still have a view of the ocean. Each site has water and electrical hookups. Some sites accommodate RVs up to 40 feet long 3. Pecan Park Campground, Texas TripAdvisor This campground is located in a large grove of green pecan trees along the stunning San Marcos River. You’ll be in a lush, quiet atmosphere — a natural paradise. The mild winters in San Marcos make it a...

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This secret room in Mount Rushmore is having a moment

This secret room in Mount Rushmore is having a moment

By Lauren Tousignant Published February 09, 2017 New York Post Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (National Parks Service) Next Abraham Lincoln holds the history of our country’s past. Literally. Tucked inside Lincoln’s frontal lobe in Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is a secret, inaccessible-to-the-public chamber. The vault was designed by the monument’s sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, who envisioned it as a room dedicated to the history of the United States. Expand / Contract A view from the rear of the Hall of Records chamber.(National Parks Service) The National Park Service details that Borglum wanted a written history of America’s greatest historical hits to go along with his four-headed sculpture, including an 800-foot stairway with a large bronze eagle – who’d have a 38-foot wingspan — at the entrance. Above the eagle an inscription would read, “America’s Onward March” and “The Hall of Records.” Carved into the walls would read America’s nine most important events from 1776 to 1906. Busts of famous Americans would line the hall, as well as a list of US contributions to art, science and industry. Unfortunately, Borglum died in 1941 and never saw his vision come to life. But in 1998, monument officials revived Borglum’s dream of the room acting as a vault for America’s history. Today, sculpted into a series of porcelain enamel panels, is the story and history of Mount Rushmore, along with an explanation of why Washington, Jefferson, Roosevelt, and Lincoln were chosen. This article originally appeared on...

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Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

By Katie Jackson Published November 28, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Escape Vista  (Steve Niedorf 2012) Next Long before the tiny-homes craze there was a fondness of log cabins. In 1916, John Lloyd Wright (son of the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright), invented Lincoln Logs. In creating this National Toy Hall of Famer, Wright brought the cabin concept into every other American living room. The first set even came with instructions on how to build Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Abraham Lincoln’s abode. A century later, our cabins can be accused of being too contemporary. However, they still conjure up feelings of comfort and a connection to nature. Whether you’re already a cabin living enthusiast or you’re just bored with hotel rooms, here are 10 cabins worth escaping to this winter. 1. Civil War-Era Cabin Travel back to the 1860s at this cabin built of beams repurposed from historic square-hewn log homes that survived the Civil War. One of the rental properties available at Missouri’s Top of the Rock resort, the 1,100-square-foot labor of luxury and love—the work of Amish craftsman and local carpenters—has commanding views of the Ozarks and Table Rock Lake. It’s a two-story home where good things come in twos. There are two master bedrooms, two bathrooms and two grand porches with golf course views. The hardest part of staying here is deciding whether to soak in the traditional copper tub or to stand under the stars in the outdoor shower made of stone. The Civil War-era cabin is bookable through Big Cedar Lodge for $500/night. 2. The Observatory at Alta Lakes Accessibility is not the biggest selling point of this backcountry cabin perched at 11,300 ft. in the Colorado Rockies. In winter, snowmobiles or cross-country skis are required to reach this dirt road retreat aptly named for its views of the surrounding San Juan Mountains and Telluride ski area. The cabin, which has been seen in commercials and on the cover of Nordstrom’s winter catalog, has two bedrooms and a sleeping loft with double bunk beds. Still, when they’re not soaking in the agate-lined hot tub, guests spend most of their indoor time around the massive wood-burning fireplace or detoxing in the sauna. Rates at the pet-friendly Observatory start at $750/night. (The price includes a complimentary oxygen supply for those needing help acclimating to the altitude.)  3. Tiny-House Cabana Located in Coldwater Gardens, a popular agrotourism destination in Florida’s Panhandle, the Tiny-House Cabana is perfect for travelers looking to stay in a labyrinth of shitake mushrooms, European honey bees, giant sunflowers and the latest aquaponics and hydroponics projects the five-acre property is undertaking. The climate-controlled one-bedroom cabin is designed for a seamless transition from...

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Botched castle restoration is deemed a ‘heritage massacre’

Botched castle restoration is deemed a ‘heritage massacre’

By Arden Dier Published March 10, 2016 Newser Facebook25 Twitter0 livefyre28 Email Print Matrera Castle (Hispania Nostra) Remember the botched “restoration” of Spanish fresco Ecce Homo back in 2012? Well, this might top it. Having stood for more than 1,000 years, Matrera Castle in Cadiz was looking a bit worse for wear when officials decided to restore the National Monument three years ago. Now, people around the world are wishing they’d left the crumbling building alone. The result is a brand new structure with the walls of the 9th-century castle appearing almost as ivy climbing its walls. “They’ve got builders in rather than restorers and, like we say round here, they’ve cocked it up,” a local man tells Spain’s La Sexta, per the Guardian. “What the hell have they done to Matrera Castle in Cadiz?” a woman adds on Twitter. “And we thought Ecce Homo was bad!” A Spanish cultural heritage group says the restoration is “absolutely terrible” and a “heritage massacre,” per the Independent. But the architect behind the restoration says it’s really not that bad. The goal was “to structurally consolidate those elements that were at risk; to differentiate new additions from the original structure, thus avoiding the imitative reconstructions that are prohibited by law; and to recover the volume, texture and tonality that the tower would originally have had,” he says. As for those less-than-flattering comments, “opinions are always welcome and constructive criticism and debate are always enriching,” he says. “But I do think that some basic, accurate information can help avoid some of the prejudices that spring from a simple image.” (This Scottish castle could be washed away.) This article originally appeared on Newser: Castle Restoration Called a ‘Heritage...

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This design features a restaurant built in a canyon cliff face

This design features a restaurant built in a canyon cliff face

Published March 10, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook238 Twitter0 livefyre19 Email Print Could you enjoy a meal dining high above a rocky canyon? (Tall Arquitectos) A new restaurant concept could take food to terrifying new heights. Copper Canyon Cocktail Bar designed by Mexico City firm Tall Arquitectos is perched high on a cliff overlooking Basaseachic Falls, the second highest waterfall in Mexico at 807 feet. Adventurous guests could rock climb up to the restaurant and rappel down after a thrilling meal. The first floor of the two-story building, which would be built into the rocky cliff face, features a restaurant and bar area on one side, with tables positioned strategically around the center. The middle of the floor will be glass, affording guests a bird’s eye view of the stunning canyon below. (Tall Arquitectos) Upstairs, the space boasts an observation deck with chairs, tables and lounge couches. Guests to the falls can even take an after dinner dip in the swimming pool. (Tall Arquitectos) (Tall Arquitectos) For now the bar at Copper Canyon is just a design but it’s not the first cliffside dwelling to strike fear in the hearts of the acrophobic everywhere. Last summer designers at Open Platform for Architecture created a stunning house nestled into a rocky cliff made of wood, glass, and concrete. An even bolder design simply called “Cliff House” featured a house that appearssuspended high above the ocean below. But if you’re looking for stunning space to grab a drink now, check out more stunning contemporary designs from Tall...

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