Airlines experimenting with kid-free zones on planes

By Cailey Rizzo | Travel + Leisure

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A few airlines have instituted no-children-allowed policies in certain areas of the plane.  (iStock)

Last m…

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Everything you can get for free at the airport

By Andrea Romano | Travel + Leisure

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iStock  (Did you know you can do yoga at the airport? Here’s everything you can do for free on your next long layov…

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Airline reveals which windows seats you should always avoid

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If you want a spot with a view, be sure to avoid these window seats.  (iStock)

How many times have you boarded a plane and arrived …

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Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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Everything you can get for free at the airport

Everything you can get for free at the airport

By Andrea Romano | Travel + Leisure Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email iStock  (Did you know you can do yoga at the airport? Here’s everything you can do for free on your next long layover. ) Killing time at the airport doesn’t have to be expensive. If you ever find yourself trapped during a long layover or stuck in a terminal due to plane delays, there are plenty of things to do in the airport that are completely free. Yes, this means you don’t have to spend money at the duty-free or at the airport bar for hours on end. Depending on where or when you fly, you can take advantage of some of these airport freebies. If you’re saving your cell phone battery, you can make free calls at Denver International Airport, Washington Dulles International Airport, and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. Just look for a marked courtesy phone. At Dulles and Ronald Reagan, local and long distance calls are free to anywhere within the contiguous United States, as long as they’re shorter than five minutes. Denver has ad-supported phones offering completely free domestic calls and 10 minutes of free long distance calls. If you need time to relax and stretch, do some yoga at San Francisco International Airport, Chicago’s O’Hare and Midway Airports, Miami International Airport, and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. These airports also have complimentary mats for guests to borrow. If you’re feeling scruffy, get a free shoe shine at Los Angeles International Airport, Denver International Airport and Missouri’s Kansas City International Airport. But it’s always customary to tip your shoe shiner. For those on especially long layovers, grab a free movie by a local filmmaker at Oregon’s Portland International Airport (post-security), San Francisco International Airport (pre-security), and Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (post-security, by Gate C18). International travelers can also catch a free movie at Singapore’s Changi Airport. Travelers who need a wardrobe change can get a free personal shopper at London’s Heathrow Airport. These fashion experts don’t work on commission and there’s no minimum price on what you want to spend. Personal shoppers can be found in the private lounge. Plus, there’s free champagne. If you need some cultural entertainment, some airports have free museums and live events. San Francisco, Miami, Albany, Minneapolis, Portland, and St. Louis have free art and history exhibits all year long right in the airport. Austin-Bergstrom International and Seattle-Tacoma International airports have at least 20 free music performances each week and you can play ping-pong at Milwaukee General Mitchell International Airport. More from Travel + Leisure Meghan Markle’s New Year’s Resolution Is to ‘Stop Swearing’ and We’ve Never Loved Her More Chrissy Teigen and John Legend Finally Made It to Tokyo, and They Celebrated With Ramen Kate Middleton Shoots Down ‘Perfect Princess’ Compliment With Four Words A British Woman Was Sentenced...

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Airline reveals which windows seats you should always avoid

Airline reveals which windows seats you should always avoid

news.com.au Facebook Twitter Comments Print Email If you want a spot with a view, be sure to avoid these window seats.  (iStock) How many times have you boarded a plane and arrived at your carefully selected window seat, only to find there’s no window? Given the sky-high view is one of the few perks of being squashed up against the wall of the plane, it’s a pretty disappointing scenario to find yourself in. Sometimes seats don’t match up with windows because of the extra rows some airlines squeeze on board, which throws the perfect alignment of seats and windows out of whack. It’s a phenomenon that’s spawned the popular hashtag #wheresmywindow. But in a new explainer on its blog, Virgin Australia reveals the “window seats” on its aircraft that have no windows and that it’s due to the air conditioning system. If you enjoy looking out the window during a flight, the airline says you want to avoid seat 9A on its Boeing 737-800 aircraft, seat 39A on the Airbus 330-200 and seats 21A and 21K on the Boeing 777-300ER. Passengers in these seats will find the person directly in front, behind and even across the row from them in the opposite window seat will have windows, but they won’t. Here’s why it happens, using the example of the Boeing 737 aircraft, which comprise the bulk of Virgin Australia’s fleet. The airline explains that on the 737s, air conditioning distribution ducts run through the fuselage — the main body of the aircraft — to overhead vents. “These ducts run up the side of the fuselage to overhead vents, in the space where a window of seat 9A would normally be, to then deliver air conditioning throughout the cabin via overhead vents,” Virgin Australia says. And it’s not just a feature on the 737. It can also be found on Boeing 777s, 747s, 757s and even the 737 MAXs. “Most Airbus aircraft types also have a similar windowless window seat, so it’s not exclusive to one aircraft type or corporation; it’s actually a pretty common design feature across commercial aircraft,” the airline says. So if you do find yourself in a windowless window seat, just know your sacrifice is keeping all your fellow passengers cool and comfortable. This article originally appeared on...

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Secure travel backpack may be pickpocket and thief proof

Secure travel backpack may be pickpocket and thief proof

By David Kaufman Published September 29, 2015 New York Post Facebook68 Twitter50 Email Print The bag’s design features zippers on the interior. (Courtesy RuitBag) At first glance it looks like a conventional backpack — all curvy shoulder straps and a back-hugging central pouch. But upon closer inspection, something is not quite right: The zippers are missing — or at least it seems that way. Related Image Expand / Contract The bag contains multiple useful compartments. (Courtesy RuitBag) Actually, this is RiutBag, a new backpack designed expressly for travelers which cleverly places its zippers on the back side of its pouch — rather than the front. It’s a simple and clearly ingenious move that suddenly makes this ubiquitous travelers’ accessory so much safer and pilfer-proof. No more worrying about forgetting to zip your backpack and some dude behind you swiping your stuff! Crafted from sturdy, water-resistant materials and available in a pair of sizes (10 liters and 15 liters), RiutBag is the brainchild of British-based Sarah Giblin, a veteran traveler who saw a niche — and need — for a safer style of backpack. Like many great inventions, the RiutBag resulted from a mix of necessity and love — having met her partner while living in Berlin, Giblin returned to the UK to study law and commuted to the Continent to maintain her long-distance relationship. Those trips led her to conclude that a new form of backpack could — and should — find form, and the RiutBag was born. Today, the RiutBag is real — funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign, manufactured in China and already enjoyed by its first crop of consumers. Designed for both serious travelers and urban nomads, the bags easily fit a laptop, keys, passports, books, snacks, a water bottle and perhaps even a hoodie. This story originally appeared on NYPost.com. RiutBag R15 capacity pack in pack out from RiutBag by Riut on Vimeo. Originally available...

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How to not get killed (or arrested) while watching wildlife

How to not get killed (or arrested) while watching wildlife

Bison, AP Photo Next Some overly eager visitors to South Lake Tahoe prompted local wildlife authorities to issue a warning recently: Stop taking selfies with the bears that feed on salmon at a popular viewing area. Sadly, such ill-advised snaps are just one example of the cluelessness of many visitors to wilderness areas, documented by hundreds of videos that provide hours of head-shaking viewing. Wildlife experts don’t know whether the proliferation of cellphones and social media sites is to blame or if the footage is just evidence of bad behavior that’s been happening all along, but they agree that many visitors to national parks and other wildlife areas remain shockingly unaware of the dangers they may encounter in the great outdoors. “In my experience, people tend to believe that the wilderness is not really very wild, that it’s been sanitized and made safe for them — and that’s just not true,” says Lee Whittlesey, historian at Yellowstone National Park and author of Death in Yellowstone: Accidents and Foolhardiness in the First National Park. “In fact, the word ‘wilderness’ comes from wild animal. But people are not used to seeing big mammals, so they get excited and run after them and chase them and try to get photos. Even with all of our warning signs and literature, we have incidents every year.” So, with the arrival of fall — a popular time to visit wilderness areas but also the rut season for large mammals like bull elk and deer — here’s a refresher on wildlife safety tips. It’s common sense for most people, but it could be a life-saving read for others. 1. Keep a safe distance. Bison, AP Photo In 2012, Yellowstone National Park posted a video of a bison charging a crowd at the Old Faithful geyser, showing how fast the animal can run and highlighting the importance of keeping a safe distance. Just how far “safe” is varies — it’s 100 yards for bears and wolves and 25 yards for all other large mammals, including bison, elk and deer, according to Yellowstone’s regulations — but a general rule of thumb is that if your presence changes the behavior of the animal, you’re way too close. 2. Don’t touch the wildlife. iStock National parks and other natural habitats are not petting zoos — it’s illegal to touch wildlife. But that doesn’t stop countless clueless visitors from trying to lay a hand on the animals. Bottom line: You should never be close enough to wildlife to touch it. 3. Don’t feed the animals. iStock Feeding animals isn’t just a problem on land; it’s also a major issue for marine creatures. In 2012, Beggar, a bottlenose dolphin in the Gulf of Mexico and one of the most studied and famous...

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The ‘me’ tourist: Social media, selfies and travel

The ‘me’ tourist: Social media, selfies and travel

Missing the view to get that perfect selfie? You’re not alone. (iStock) When you think about travel, the word “experience” comes to mind. But it’s hard to “experience” what’s all around you when you’re spending every moment with a smartphone in front of your face. These days, walking through Times Square in New York is like navigating a maze in constant motion. Instead of staying on a fixed path to get where you’re going, you have to weave through countless thousands of people – mostly tourists – who are either snapping photos or walking aimlessly with their heads down, looking at their phones. And it isn’t just in hot spots like Times Square. Go to any tourist destination and you’ll see the same thing. Have people forgotten why they travel? Or has travel become less about “what” and “why” – and more about “me”? The ‘Me’ Traveler Now screaming from your Facebook page: “Look at me I’m standing in front of the pyramids!” “Hey, look, I’m at the Eiffel Tower!” “Bet you wish you were me!” But the pictures are like a visual checkbox that says, “Another one off the bucket list!” They barely touch on the experience. Selfies are a big part of this, and some have become the subject of hot debate and even scorn. Take the case of National Basketball Association player Danny Green, who posted a selfie at the Berlin Holocaust Memorial with #Holocaust and LOL in the same tweet. But Green was hardly the first, and unfortunately he won’t be the last, to post something offensive. This is what happens when a solemn site is open for tourists. Addicted to social media and self-promotion, they are seconds away from sharing their “experience” with the world, even before they stop to understand it. So let’s do our best to limit how often this happens by helping travelers understand, in a positive way, how travel changes lives for the better. Make it About the Experience, Not You Some of the most amazing experiences in life come when you travel to new places. They can change how you view the world, if you’re prepared to take them all in. They get captured in your psyche, not in your iPhone. Think about why you travel and what a trip might mean to you. Understand and be sensitive to your surroundings, especially the culture of the people whose country you’ll be visiting. You’ll feel more connected to the place and its history if you take some time to learn about it and understand it before you go. Leave it in Your Pocket Whether it’s an amazing rainbow over Diamond Head in Hawaii or a museum that reminds you of the horrors...

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Tips for seeing wildlife when camping

Published June 03, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook7 Twitter67 Gplus0 Looking for ways to get your kids outside and away from the TV this summer? Try camping. Whether you pitch a tent in the backwoods or just in the backyard, it’s a great way to get close to nature. David Mizejewski, naturalist & wildlife expert for the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), says camping and observing animals in nature is fun for the whole family – but he cautions against taking selfies with squirrels. “We don’t want to ever try to approach or feed or definitely never touch a wild animal because they’re wild. They can bite or scratch. Even something like a squirrel can give you a pretty bad bite,” Mizejewski said. “So the message is appreciate them, get your camera out, take pictures, but let them be wild. Give them their space and everything will be great.” Want to see some nocturnal animals feeding?  Pick areas where night-flying insects are abundant, such as over water, or near flood lights and street lights. Light and water attract the insects that certain animals, like owls fox and moths feed on at night. Or smear fruit on a tree in the late afternoon or early in the night and check it later for animal activity. Another tip: make sure you bring enough water. “It doesn’t matter if you’re camping out in the woods somewhere or if you’re camping out in your backyard” Mizejewski said. “Make sure you bring plenty of fluids. You want to stay hydrated especially if it’s hot out, which it usually is at this time of year.” NWF is encouraging families to participate in the Great American Backyard Campout on June 28. The event, now in its tenth year, aims to help families reconnect with nature. Participants can pledge to camp out and proceeds for the event go toward supporting NWF’s programs. Don’t worry if you’re new to camping. NWF has packing lists, recipes, nocturnal wildlife guides, exploration activities, nature games, and more on its website. WATCH A FOX, OWL AND BABY BEAVER VISIT THE FOXNEWS.COM STUDIO:...

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