4 turkey hunting tactics that work when nothing else will

By Tom Carpenter, Ron Spomer and Jeff Johnston

Published May 01, 2017

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 (iStock)

Sometimes turkey hunting is like magic, and responsive gobblers come in on a string. These…

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How to build a grill from sticks for campsite cooking

By Tim MacWelch

Published April 04, 2017

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Green-wood grilling is a great option for camping.  (Tim MacWelch/Outdoor Life)

For a real wilderness feast, the green-wood grill…

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Outdoor Channel's Steve West kills potential world-record caribou

Published March 23, 2017
FoxNews.com

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Steve West of “The Adventure Series” is awaiting certification of a potential world-record Woodland Caribou.  (Outdoor Channel)

Steve West …

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New Zealand running out of hotel rooms for all its tourists

By Cailey Rizzo

Published March 21, 2017

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 (iStock)

New Zealand is getting so popular with tourists, it’s running out of hotel rooms.

According to a Bloomberg report, t…

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Americans are camping in record numbers, but they still want Wi-Fi

Published March 21, 2017
FoxNews.com

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More and more Americans are going camping each year, according to a new study.  (iStock)

Think people are all about super luxurious getaway…

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Travel Info

Secure travel backpack may be pickpocket and thief proof

Secure travel backpack may be pickpocket and thief proof

By David Kaufman Published September 29, 2015 New York Post Facebook68 Twitter50 Email Print The bag’s design features zippers on the interior. (Courtesy RuitBag) At first glance it looks like a conventional backpack — all curvy shoulder straps and a back-hugging central pouch. But upon closer inspection, something is not quite right: The zippers are missing — or at least it seems that way. Related Image Expand / Contract The bag contains multiple useful compartments. (Courtesy RuitBag) Actually, this is RiutBag, a new backpack designed expressly for travelers which cleverly places its zippers on the back side of its pouch — rather than the front. It’s a simple and clearly ingenious move that suddenly makes this ubiquitous travelers’ accessory so much safer and pilfer-proof. No more worrying about forgetting to zip your backpack and some dude behind you swiping your stuff! Crafted from sturdy, water-resistant materials and available in a pair of sizes (10 liters and 15 liters), RiutBag is the brainchild of British-based Sarah Giblin, a veteran traveler who saw a niche — and need — for a safer style of backpack. Like many great inventions, the RiutBag resulted from a mix of necessity and love — having met her partner while living in Berlin, Giblin returned to the UK to study law and commuted to the Continent to maintain her long-distance relationship. Those trips led her to conclude that a new form of backpack could — and should — find form, and the RiutBag was born. Today, the RiutBag is real — funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign, manufactured in China and already enjoyed by its first crop of consumers. Designed for both serious travelers and urban nomads, the bags easily fit a laptop, keys, passports, books, snacks, a water bottle and perhaps even a hoodie. This story originally appeared on NYPost.com. RiutBag R15 capacity pack in pack out from RiutBag by Riut on Vimeo. Originally available...

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How to not get killed (or arrested) while watching wildlife

How to not get killed (or arrested) while watching wildlife

Bison, AP Photo Next Some overly eager visitors to South Lake Tahoe prompted local wildlife authorities to issue a warning recently: Stop taking selfies with the bears that feed on salmon at a popular viewing area. Sadly, such ill-advised snaps are just one example of the cluelessness of many visitors to wilderness areas, documented by hundreds of videos that provide hours of head-shaking viewing. Wildlife experts don’t know whether the proliferation of cellphones and social media sites is to blame or if the footage is just evidence of bad behavior that’s been happening all along, but they agree that many visitors to national parks and other wildlife areas remain shockingly unaware of the dangers they may encounter in the great outdoors. “In my experience, people tend to believe that the wilderness is not really very wild, that it’s been sanitized and made safe for them — and that’s just not true,” says Lee Whittlesey, historian at Yellowstone National Park and author of Death in Yellowstone: Accidents and Foolhardiness in the First National Park. “In fact, the word ‘wilderness’ comes from wild animal. But people are not used to seeing big mammals, so they get excited and run after them and chase them and try to get photos. Even with all of our warning signs and literature, we have incidents every year.” So, with the arrival of fall — a popular time to visit wilderness areas but also the rut season for large mammals like bull elk and deer — here’s a refresher on wildlife safety tips. It’s common sense for most people, but it could be a life-saving read for others. 1. Keep a safe distance. Bison, AP Photo In 2012, Yellowstone National Park posted a video of a bison charging a crowd at the Old Faithful geyser, showing how fast the animal can run and highlighting the importance of keeping a safe distance. Just how far “safe” is varies — it’s 100 yards for bears and wolves and 25 yards for all other large mammals, including bison, elk and deer, according to Yellowstone’s regulations — but a general rule of thumb is that if your presence changes the behavior of the animal, you’re way too close. 2. Don’t touch the wildlife. iStock National parks and other natural habitats are not petting zoos — it’s illegal to touch wildlife. But that doesn’t stop countless clueless visitors from trying to lay a hand on the animals. Bottom line: You should never be close enough to wildlife to touch it. 3. Don’t feed the animals. iStock Feeding animals isn’t just a problem on land; it’s also a major issue for marine creatures. In 2012, Beggar, a bottlenose dolphin in the Gulf of Mexico and one of the most studied and famous...

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The ‘me’ tourist: Social media, selfies and travel

The ‘me’ tourist: Social media, selfies and travel

Missing the view to get that perfect selfie? You’re not alone. (iStock) When you think about travel, the word “experience” comes to mind. But it’s hard to “experience” what’s all around you when you’re spending every moment with a smartphone in front of your face. These days, walking through Times Square in New York is like navigating a maze in constant motion. Instead of staying on a fixed path to get where you’re going, you have to weave through countless thousands of people – mostly tourists – who are either snapping photos or walking aimlessly with their heads down, looking at their phones. And it isn’t just in hot spots like Times Square. Go to any tourist destination and you’ll see the same thing. Have people forgotten why they travel? Or has travel become less about “what” and “why” – and more about “me”? The ‘Me’ Traveler Now screaming from your Facebook page: “Look at me I’m standing in front of the pyramids!” “Hey, look, I’m at the Eiffel Tower!” “Bet you wish you were me!” But the pictures are like a visual checkbox that says, “Another one off the bucket list!” They barely touch on the experience. Selfies are a big part of this, and some have become the subject of hot debate and even scorn. Take the case of National Basketball Association player Danny Green, who posted a selfie at the Berlin Holocaust Memorial with #Holocaust and LOL in the same tweet. But Green was hardly the first, and unfortunately he won’t be the last, to post something offensive. This is what happens when a solemn site is open for tourists. Addicted to social media and self-promotion, they are seconds away from sharing their “experience” with the world, even before they stop to understand it. So let’s do our best to limit how often this happens by helping travelers understand, in a positive way, how travel changes lives for the better. Make it About the Experience, Not You Some of the most amazing experiences in life come when you travel to new places. They can change how you view the world, if you’re prepared to take them all in. They get captured in your psyche, not in your iPhone. Think about why you travel and what a trip might mean to you. Understand and be sensitive to your surroundings, especially the culture of the people whose country you’ll be visiting. You’ll feel more connected to the place and its history if you take some time to learn about it and understand it before you go. Leave it in Your Pocket Whether it’s an amazing rainbow over Diamond Head in Hawaii or a museum that reminds you of the horrors...

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Tips for seeing wildlife when camping

Published June 03, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook7 Twitter67 Gplus0 Looking for ways to get your kids outside and away from the TV this summer? Try camping. Whether you pitch a tent in the backwoods or just in the backyard, it’s a great way to get close to nature. David Mizejewski, naturalist & wildlife expert for the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), says camping and observing animals in nature is fun for the whole family – but he cautions against taking selfies with squirrels. “We don’t want to ever try to approach or feed or definitely never touch a wild animal because they’re wild. They can bite or scratch. Even something like a squirrel can give you a pretty bad bite,” Mizejewski said. “So the message is appreciate them, get your camera out, take pictures, but let them be wild. Give them their space and everything will be great.” Want to see some nocturnal animals feeding?  Pick areas where night-flying insects are abundant, such as over water, or near flood lights and street lights. Light and water attract the insects that certain animals, like owls fox and moths feed on at night. Or smear fruit on a tree in the late afternoon or early in the night and check it later for animal activity. Another tip: make sure you bring enough water. “It doesn’t matter if you’re camping out in the woods somewhere or if you’re camping out in your backyard” Mizejewski said. “Make sure you bring plenty of fluids. You want to stay hydrated especially if it’s hot out, which it usually is at this time of year.” NWF is encouraging families to participate in the Great American Backyard Campout on June 28. The event, now in its tenth year, aims to help families reconnect with nature. Participants can pledge to camp out and proceeds for the event go toward supporting NWF’s programs. Don’t worry if you’re new to camping. NWF has packing lists, recipes, nocturnal wildlife guides, exploration activities, nature games, and more on its website. WATCH A FOX, OWL AND BABY BEAVER VISIT THE FOXNEWS.COM STUDIO:...

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Beware of vacation club fraud

By Anthony Giorgianni Published April 24, 2014 Consumer Reports Facebook9 Twitter11 Gplus0 A  lawsuit the Massachusetts attorney general recently filed against a Pittsfield vacation club and an affiliated company underscores why you should consider carefully before doing business with a discount travel company or vacation club. A court has issued a preliminary injunction ordering the companies to stop using alleged deceptive marketing to sell travel memberships, Attorney General Martha Coakley of Massachusetts recently announced. Coakley said the companies offered consumers free travel incentives and extreme discounts on travel, but instead charged them thousands of dollars for access to a proprietary software database that failed to provide the promised discounts. “Vacation or travel scams offer free or discounted deals that often never materialize, and our office alleges these companies stole thousands of dollars from consumers through their deceptive memberships,” Coakley said in a statement. The temporary injuction bars the companies from advertising free travel that in fact requires consumers to pay taxes and fees. Nor can they promote access to nonexistent wholesale travel discount or hold consumers to a three-day cancellation period when they have not yet received access to the companies’ website. The state is seeking more than $108,000 in restitution to victims and $170,000 in civil penalties. For more information about vacation fraud, read our report “Vacation Scams Can Cost You Any Time Of Year. Watch For The Warning Signs Of Travel Fraud.” Over the years, we’ve seen many gripes about travel clubs in complaints filed with the the Better Business Bureau and such websites as Complaints.com and RipoffReport. In 2012, the New Jersey attorney general sued a company and its owner for failing to provide promised deep discounts, vacation accommodations, and other travel services for which it charged one-time membership fees that ranged from $995 to $8,500, plus a $29.95 monthly charge. Here are tips to consider if you’re contemplating joining a vacation club. Check out the company at the Better Business Bureau, and by using a web search with the company name along with such words as “complaints” and “reviews.” Ask about trip-cancellation and refund policies. Get the answers in writing. Request a detailed explanation of any vaguely worded descriptions, such as “5-star accommodations.” Be especially wary of unsolicited promotions that come by mail, e-mail, or fax offering deeply discounted travel packages. Copyright © 2005-2014 Consumers Union of U.S., Inc. No reproduction, in whole or in part, without written permission. Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this...

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Visit these real cities by playing a video game

By John Brandon Published April 14, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook42 Twitter246 Gplus9 Sony Computer Entertainment/Charlie Schuck Photography Next Video games often show bloody scenes of rampant carnage, speeding racecars on professional tracks, and cartoon-like plumbers jumping off platforms. Yet, in a few cases, games take place in real cities like New York and Seattle. Because the new Sony PlayStation 4 and Microsoft Xbox One console systems have such fine fidelity when it comes to graphics, you can now visit these cities in a virtual environment — and believe you are really there. 1. ‘inFAMOUS Second Son,’ City: Seattle Sony Computer Entertainment/Charlie Schuck Photography One of the most faithful renditions of any US city in a game, “inFAMOUS Second Son” lets you walk around Seattle’s waterfront area, the Market District, and even goggle at the Space Needle. If you play the game, available now for PS4, make sure you hunt around for the gumwall. It’s located in an alleyway in the Market District. In real life, the iconic gumwall is a few inches thick in some spots and has appeared on many “most germiest” tourist destinations. 2. ‘Watch Dogs,’ City: Chicago Ubisoft/Google We live in a surveillance society, and this upcoming open-world action game from Ubisoft is playing off that stark reality. Set in a futuristic-looking Chicago, the game gives you plenty of hacker tools to infiltrate a super-secret corporation known only as Blume. Thankfully, Chicagoans will feel right at home in the game — you’ll notice landmarks such as the Marina City complex that sits next to the Chicago River near downtown. 3. ‘Tom Clancy’s The Division’, City: New York Ubisoft/Google Many military-themed games show real cities as they predict to look in the future — e.g., after they’ve been blown apart by tanks and rocket launchers. This tactical shooter from Ubisoft coming later this year is hyper-realistic: “The team is working on creating the most realistic and detailed New York City ever created in a video game,” game director at Ubisoft Ryan Barnard told FoxNews.com. According to Barnard, there were only a few adjustments made for smoother gameplay and the chaotic post-apocalyptic tone. 4. ‘2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil’, City: São Paulo, Brazil EA Sports/ Portal da Copa/ME Few of us will visit São Paulo in Brazil this summer during the World Cup, but you can get pretty close in the game “2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil” for PS3 and Xbox 360. The city, located near the southeastern coast, is building a brand new stadium to host the opening match. The game gives you ample opportunity to catch a few rays, glance around at the rolling hills and neo-classical architecture nearby, and inspect the detailed crowd animations. 5. ‘MLB The Show 14,’ City: Pittsburgh Sony/VisitPITTSBURGH Baseball games...

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