Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

Fox News

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Travel Info

Taking the Kids — and the true secret to vacation happiness — asking their help planning

By Eileen Ogintz Published March 21, 2014 FoxNews.com Kayaking among glaciers. (THOMSON FAMILY ADVENTURES) Biking in Alaska. (AUSTIN ADVENTURES) Hiking in Alaska. (AUSTIN ADVENTURES) Rafting adventure in Alaska. (AUSTIN ADVENTURES) Next SlidePrevious Slide Pity the California dad. He had spent a lot of money to take his wife and three daughters on an adventure trip to Costa Rica — idyllic remote eco lodges, nesting sea turtles, monkeys in the trees, butterfly gardens. As adventures went, it hit all the buttons for my 13-year-old niece and her pal — we were on that same trip from Thomson Family Adventures. Unfortunately, this dad’s three tween and teen daughters didn’t think so. They had wanted to go to Maui and a Costa Rica adventure vacation couldn’t be any more different than the big, fancy beach resort they’d envisioned. It wasn’t a question of cost either — Maui might even have cost less. It was what their dad had wanted them to experience. He was very excited about the trip. Too bad those kids weren’t happy campers, complaining about everything from the lack of air conditioning to the bugs. That, of course, meant their parents weren’t happy either. The kids weren’t spoiled brats; they just hated being dragged along somewhere they had no desire to be. It was, after all, their vacation too. The lesson: Take the kids’ opinions into account when planning a family getaway, whether it’s a big-ticket adventure, a trip to Orlando, a camping trip or a weekend exploring a city. Believe me, if the kids aren’t happy, you won’t be. That holds too for grandparents planning a multigenerational trip for grandkids they may not see that often. I admit I’ve been there — like the time I dragged my wilderness-loving daughters to an all-inclusive in Mexico. Thankfully, they didn’t whine, but they only perked up when we left the resort to explore a cave or a nearby beach town. These days, according to new research from the 2014 Portrait of American Travelers, there’s a lot more discussion with the kids about vacation and I’m glad to see it. Sixty-Six percent of those polled who have kids living at home report the kids are influential in their vacation planning and decisions. That’s a more than 20 percent jump from 2011. (Take note marketers: Kids now have an important and growing say in where families go and what they do when they get there!) As you plan your next family getaway, ask the kids: — See dinosaurs at a natural history museum or take part in a hands-on art experience at an art museum? — Hike to a waterfall or a lake? — Eat Chinese, Sushi or Italian? Create pin boards on Pinterest to collect everyone’s ideas....

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Hey seat 12C, won’t you at least say hi?

By George Hobica Published February 24, 2014 FoxNews.com ISTOCK We’ve all experienced it when flying. You sit in the tin can for three, four, maybe even 12 hours, and you completely ignore the people sitting next to you. As in, not a word. No eye contact. Not even when climbing over your neighbors in the middle and aisle seats when you get up from your window seat to use the lavatory. It’s just weird. Maybe that’s why Virgin America offers seat-to-seat chat via the inflight entertainment system, though not many people use it. Look, I get it. We’re all paranoid about encountering a motor mouth. It happened to me once. I was on a flight from Boston to San Francisco, and the woman wouldn’t stop talking. She told me her life story, literally. And then – true story! – a few days later, I found myself standing behind her at an ATM, and I said hello and she had no idea who I was. So much for human interaction. But still, are we taking the “ignore your neighbor” credo a bit too far? Now don’t get me wrong: I don’t actually want to have aconversation with you. A friendly nod will do. A “pardon me” when you signal that you’d like to get into or out of the row. Even a gentle tap if I’m sleeping. Anything but the silent treatment. One of the weirdest things about air travel is pretending that the people in your aisle are invisible. Maybe it’s just me, but I find it truly odd sitting next to someone for four, five, six or 12 hours, pretending they’re not there. There’s a difference between being a chatty Cathy and simply saying “hello,” or at least offering a wan smile when sitting down at the start of a flight, or an “excuse me” when getting up from the window or middle seat. Instead, this is what usually happens: The plane is boarding and I’m already in the aisle seat, reading a newspaper. Someone stands next to me and does one of the following: 1. Throws something on the middle or window seat and points. No eye contact. No words. Just points. Or maybe grunts. 2. Just stands there waiting for you to get up. Again, no eye contact, no words. 3. Just climbs over you. And then he or she sits down without saying a word for the entire flight. I see this all the time, and it bothers me. OK, I’m whining here, I admit it. But sometimes it goes too far. I was flying with a colleague from London to Mumbai on British Airways recently. He was in an economy class window seat in a two-by-two seating configuration....

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10 great gifts for adventure-minded travelers

By Blane Bachelor Holiday Gift Guide Published December 19, 2013 FoxNews.com The holiday spending season is gearing up, but picking out the perfect gift for the jet-setter or adventurer on your list can put even the jolliest of shoppers into the Grinchy-iest of moods.  With so many options out there for gear and gadgets, how to find just the right one – without breaking the bank, no less? Let our handy gift guide come to the rescue. We’ve scoured the latest offerings, as well as proven favorites, for offerings at $150 or less that are sure to inspire a trip somewhere – whether it’s camping in the backyard overnight or backpacking around the world. Happy travels. 1Bushnell Powersync SolarWrap Mini, $90 Bushnell On-the-go folks love power on demand, especially outlet-free charging in the great outdoors or on an airplane.  Bushnell has delivered with its PowerSync line of solar-powered chargers.  At a mere 3.1 ounces, the Mini is the lightest and smallest personal solar device on the market, making it an ideal addition to any backpack or carry-on. The 18” portable solar panel, which comes with a lifelong lithium-ion battery, rolls up into a beautifully compact cylinder, about the size of a small flashlight, and is compatible with smartphones, tablets, and the like. It comes equipped with a USB cable and clever cap covers, and even a hole to stake the panel to the ground in windy conditions. Unfurl it at a sunny campsite or hang it with a carabiner from your backpack (it needs about 10 hours of sunlight, or four from an outlet, to fully charge). Charged up, it works just as well in the great indoors.  Whip it out in a crowded airport and watch the envy of other travelers scrambling for outlets. 2Patagonia Women’s Nano Puff Vest, $149 Patagonia While puff-style garments are wonderful for keeping the wearer warm, they also tend to make her look, well, puffy. That’s why this vest (which is also available in a men’s version) is perfect for outdoorsy gals who don’t want to feel like a Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon during their active-minded pursuits. Its longer fit and feather-light weight make for a – dare we say? – slimming profile that provides delicious warmth. Plus, it’s water-repellent, weighs a mere 7.4 ounces and comes with thoughtful extras like cozy, zippered exterior pockets and an interior pocket that doubles as a stuff sack. So, on the rare occasion that you’re not wearing the vest, you’ve got a puffy little travel pillow in a pinch. 3Trek Light Gear Double Hammock, $75 Trek Light If there’s a gift that will spark longing for warmer weather, this lightweight hammock is it. Made from parachute nylon and weighing just 20 ounces, the...

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Top 5 ways to annoy your social media friends while on vacation

By Dave Seminara Published November 05, 2013 FoxNews.com ISTOCK 1Top 5 ways to annoy your social media friends while on vacation Once upon a time, we used to invite our friends and family members over so we could torture them with hundreds of slides or photos from our most recent vacation. “Here’s one of me feeding a parrot!” Now, in an era where social media is an established part of our culture, we’re still subjecting our friends to our vacation photos and memories, only now we tend to do it online and in real time. You can hide, but you’ll never totally escape your friends’ vacations. Most of us have at least one friend who just can’t help but over-post on social media sites, and the habit tends to go into overdrive when the offending party is on vacation. If people knew how to take photos, this trend would only be mildly annoying. But most people are more likely to post 18 photos of the back of some guy’s head than something that might end up in National Geographic. So why do people spend their precious holidays posting and tweeting? What are the consequences of over-posting and how do we avoid serial over-posters without damaging our relationship with that person? “People are really excited about their vacations but for the rest of the world, it’s just not that interesting,” said Dr. Marla Vannucci, associate professor of Clinical Psychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology. “It’s like the idea that you have to sit through someone else’s vacation. Every meal, every step and you’re not really experiencing it with them.” Jeremy Birnholtz, an assistant professor at Northwestern University who does research on human-computer interaction issues, says that before you go on an un-friending binge, consider the fact that most over-posters aren’t intentionally trying to annoy us. “Posting photos of yourself on vacation is like impression management,” he said. “People paint a particular picture of themselves to get the reaction they want.” Dr. Vannucci said that she has one Facebook friend who feels inadequate and over-posts vacation photos to feel better about himself. “People who have that narcissistic motivation, they want to provoke envy,” she said.  “They want people to wish they were with them.” Facebook is the vacation gloating venue of choice for Baby Boomers and Generation Xers while Millennials tend to prefer Instagram. Other sites like Foursquare and Pinterest also have their devotees.  Birnholtz believes that happy travelers tend to use Twitter less, but says that if you unfollow an over-poster there, the user is less likely to notice than if you unfriend someone on Facebook. He prefers to use the “hide all content” button found on the drop...

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13 survival myths that could kill you

Published September 06, 2013 TheActiveTimes What do you do when survival is not guaranteed? You’re lost, stranded, injured miles from civilization—if you even know what direction civilization is. Chances are you haven’t taken a survival course, and all you’ve got to fall back on are your wits and fragments of received wisdom that you’ve gleaned from TV, movies and maybe a magazine article or two. The sun’s going down, and your stomach starts growling, and you think, “Maybe I should find some berries for dinner”—you’re pretty sure you know which ones are edible. Or it’s been a couple days and you remember an episode of Man vs. Wild where Bear Grylls chows down on a raw grub and think “I might just be hungry enough…” Or, say you’ve hiked to the bottom of a canyon and realize you don’t know how to get out and your water’s running low. “I should make this last,” you think before your mind turns to an old John Wayne movie where he squeezes clear liquid from the pulp of a barrel cactus. Ask a survival expert, though, and he or she will likely tell you none of these things is a good idea. For just about any survival situation, there’s a wealth of knowledge out there, and a lot of it’s bad. Often things aren’t helped by the burgeoning number of survival reality shows, which are designed to entertain rather than to educate. “I’ve worked on these reality shows,” says Tony Nester, an expert on desert survival and head of Ancient Pathways, an outdoor survival and bushcraft school based in Flagstaff, Arizona. “They’re heavily scripted and there’s always a support crew within twenty feet, twenty-four seven.” As a teacher, Nester constantly finds himself correcting his student’s misconceptions about what do in survival situations. For example, students often come to his survival courses and want to learn right away how to make fire by rubbing sticks together. “Hey, there’s no greater joy than sitting next to a fire that you made the old way,” says Nester. “But that’s not what I want to do when I have an injured shoulder and the sun’s going down and it’s getting cold.” One of Nester’s favorite examples is the solar still, a device one can make—given the right materials—to collect and distill water. Grylls once made one on his show to demonstrate desert survival, and students ask Nester how to do it themselves. Nester teaches his students the method’s fatal flaw by having them make their own. (Hint: digging a hole in desert heat is no easy task.) Nester emphasizes that there’s a difference between “survival”—living long enough to be rescued—and “bushcraft”—the art of living outdoors—which people...

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Survive anything

Published September 01, 2013 Men’s Health Ah, the great outdoors. It’s where men morph into testosterone-fueled animals, taking summits by storm, conquering raging rivers, and flying down trails. At least that was the fantasy while you were loading up your gear. What happens instead: You fall out of your kayak, a slick rock leads to an ankle twist, or a tree branch spears you in your sleep. But don’t pull up the tent stakes just yet. You don’t have to be Bear Grylls to hack it in the backwoods. All you need is this field guide, created with the help of Dr. Travis Stork, the Men’s Health emergency-medicine advisor and host of “The Doctors.” Seeking shade should not be your priority. Worry less about bears and more about a tree limb impaling your ass. If you camp under a tree with large, broken overhanging branches and a storm blows in, these “widowmakers” could fall and turn your sleeping bag into a body bag, Craig Morgan, host of the Outdoor Channel’s “All Access Outdoors,” said. Ideally, set up camp close to a meadow but away from tall grass, where ticks thrive. (From your tent to the best trails, Men’s Health Base Camp has the great outdoors covered.) DROP LOGS IN THE FOREST Extend the “leave no trace” ethic to personal hygiene with the help of with the help of Kathleen Meyer, author of “How to S**t in the Woods.” 1. Plan for pooping Pack toilet paper, sealable plastic bags, alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and a trowel, such as the 5-ounce U-Dig-It Stainless-Steel Hand Shovel. “It’s stainless steel, folds into a sheath on your belt, and won’t bend or break,” Meyer said. 2. Stake out a spot Find a secluded area that isn’t within 200 yards of a water source or right off the trail. Use your trowel to dig a hole 6 to 8 inches deep. “The best enzymes for decomposition are in that top layer of soil,” Meyer said. Forgot TP? Hunt for soft fallen leaves that haven’t dried up, or even a smooth stone. 3. Assume the position Squat in a surfer’s stance: butt below your knees, arms extended for balance. Done? Bury the leaves or stone along with your waste, or if you used toilet paper, seal it in a plastic bag, carry it out of the woods with you, and flush it at home. And don’t forget to sanitize your hands! (Make sure your plumbing is clear of cancer. Here are 9 warning signs you shouldn’t ignore.) 4 FIRST-AID UPGRADES You should already have gauze pads, band-aids, ibuprofen, and wipes your first-aid kit. Bolster with it. 1. Duct tape It’s waterproof, super-sticky, and versatile. “Pack multiuse things that are hard...

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