Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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Winter Travel

Top 10 sleigh rides in North America

By Laura Kelly Published February 05, 2014 FoxNews.com Imagine snuggling up in a blanket and listening to the sleigh bells ring as you ride a horse-drawn sleigh through a wonderland of snow. Sound like your cup of tea? Here are 10 of the best sleigh rides that offer this experience and more in some of the most scenic spots in North America. 1National Elk Refuge: Jackson Hole, Wyo. Lori Iverson/USFWS Topping the list, the National Elk Refuge sleigh ride operated by Double H Bar, Inc. offers unbeatable views of the Wyoming landscape and the elk that roam it. Over 5,000 of the 11,000 elk in the Jackson elk herd visit the 25,000-acre refuge during the winter. From December through early April you can hop aboard a sleigh for an hour-long ride that gives you an up-close look at the 500-pound beauties. You may see other wildlife, too, including eagles, wolves and swans. Sleighs operate from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Price: Adult $19; Child (ages 5 to 12) $15 2Two Below Zero: Frisco, Colo. Two Below Zero Two Below Zero offers the complete package with its popular dinner sleigh ride. Sit back and relax as you glide beneath snow-capped mountains and snow-covered pine trees. After a 20-minute sleigh ride, hop off and make your way into a cozy, heated cabin for a three-course dinner that includes Southwestern soup, top sirloin or marinated chicken breast, vegetables, a baked potato and warm apple pie. Finish the night off with some live country music and then enjoy the 20-minute sleigh ride back to base. Price: Adult $84; Child (ages 4 to 12) $55 3Thunder Bay Resort: Hillman, Mich. Thunder Bay Resort Travel over the Thunder Bay River and through the woods to a log cabin for a five-course dinner withThunder Bay Resort’s elk-viewing and gourmet dinner sleigh ride package. Once at the cabin, you can cozy up to a split-stone fireplace while chefs prepare your meal on antique wood cook stoves. The dinner includes samples of five to seven local wines, a shrimp cocktail, chicken noodle soup, salad, crown roast of pork, roasted potatoes, a pear/apple crepe and white chocolate mousse-filled pizzelles. Price: $89.50 per person 4Brewster Adventures: Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka The views don’t get much better than this. One of the most scenic rides on the list, the Brewster Adventuressleigh ride follows a lakeside trail that winds through snow-covered pine trees, past frozen waterfalls and beneath the Victoria Glacier. The 15-passenger sleigh features upholstered seats and blankets, so you can enjoy the 45- to 60-minute ride in comfort. Sleighs depart from the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise in Alberta every day of the week, with the first departing at 1 p.m. and the last departing at 8 p.m.,...

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Best sledding spots around the world

By Laura Kelly Published December 09, 2013 FoxNews.com Winter is coming, and for some of us that means nothing more than the winter blues. But who says wintertime has to be a downer? After all, it’s a time outdoor fun. So don’t pull those covers over your head. If you’re looking for some adventure and/or a way to make the snow more bearable, try some sledding. No, we’re not talking down-your-backyard-bunny-hill sledding; we’re talking 9-mile-toboggan-runs-down-the-Swiss-Alps sledding. Intrigued? Read on for eight sledding spots that will make you wonder why you ever settled for less. 1Bramberg, Austria Wildkogel-Arena Looking for some record-breaking fun? Situated in western Austria, the Wildkogel Sledding Arena is home to the world’s longest floodlit toboggan run. At just over eight miles, the thrilling course takes 30 to 50 minutes to complete. Travel by lift almost a mile up to the start of the run, and then descend by toboggan or sled to the bottom of the mountain. You can rent sleds in town, but be sure to reserve them well in advance. The track is floodlit until 10 p.m. and is open from December to mid-March. Price: Adult day pass $36; Child day pass $18 2Tromso, Norway Lloyd Rehnlund Framed by dramatic mountains and fjords and extending into the Lapland tundra, Tromso is an ideal setting for an unforgettable sled ride. Top-rated operator,Lyngsfjord Adventure offers a highly recommended evening reindeer sled ride from November to March. During the four and a half-hour-long sled ride, learn about the indigenous Sami people and get the chance to see the magical Northern Lights. FYI- Tromso is considered one of the best places in the world to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights. The excursion concludes with a hot meal and includes transportation to and from the sled site. Price: Adult $258; Child (ages 4 to 15) $129 3Bergün, Switzerland Andrea Badrutt/ Berguen Filisur Tourism Begin your journey with a scenic ride on the historic Rhaetian Railway through winding tunnels and over striking UNESCO World Heritage landscapes. Arrive in Preda at almost 6,000 feet above sea level — you can grab a bite to eat at one of the restaurants there — and suit up for a 4-mile-long floodlit toboggan ride that drops over 1,300 feet and runs beneath ancient stone bridges. For a faster-paced course in the same area, try the toboggan run from Darlux to Bergün (Adult $16; Child $10). Price: Adult single-ride pass $15; Child single-ride pass $8; Sled rental from $8 per day 4Haute-Savoie, France Aravis/David Machet Referred to by some as the No. 1 destination in the world for winter sports, Haute-Savoie, just 50 minutes from Geneva, is a top-notch spot for sledding, especially for kids. Ski resort La Clusaz has three toboggan...

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Some Northeast ski resorts open earlier than ever

Published November 25, 2013 Associated Press Nov. 19, 2013: A snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. (THE ASSOCIATED PRESS) MONTPELIER, VT. –  Ski areas in the Northeast continue to pump millions of dollars in new high-tech snowmaking to draw early season skiers and riders and to ensure their slopes will remain snowy into the spring. An early cold snap allowed resorts from Vermont to Maine to fire up snow guns in the beginning of November. New Hampshire’s Loon Mountain opened Nov. 8, its earliest top-to-bottom opening ever, thanks to a $1.3 million investment to revamp its snowmaking. “This season, we opened about 10 days early which is really big for us,” said spokesman Greg Kwasnik. In Vermont, Okemo, Mount Snow and Bromley Mountain are among the resorts that opened in mid-November. “It’s the earliest opening that I can remember, and I’ve been here 40 years,” Bromley President Bill Cairns said. Stowe Mountain Resort continues its major snowmaking revamp spending another $3.4 million on new equipment and upgrades, including 100 tower guns, three fan guns and miles of snowmaking pipe. That’s on top of $4.7 million spent last year. Maine’s two biggest resorts — Sugarloaf and Sunday River — have installed hundreds of new energy efficient snow guns for this season, on top of big investments in equipment in recent years. The new high efficiency, low-energy equipment allows the resorts to keep the slopes covered at a fraction of the energy costs, eliminating the need for thousands of gallons of diesel fuel. Aside from more snow, skiers and riders will notice new lodging, terrain parks and glade offerings at some resorts. Big changes to the tune of $43 million are on the ground at Jay Peak in northern Vermont near the Canadian border, including an 80,000-square-foot (7,430-square-meter) Stateside Hotel and base lodge and 84 new mountain cottages. Sunday River in Maine has added a new 15-acre (6-hectare) terrain park including a jump line, super pipe, and rail park. And Sugarloaf has expanded its back-country-style terrain by 70 more acres (28 hectares) and added a new 30-person outdoor hot tub to its Sugarloaf Mountain Hotel. And this December holiday season at Loon Mountain skiers and riders can visit an ice castle made out of a lattice work of icicles. It’s expected to be open to the public over the December holiday. “The walls are going to be between 25 and 45 feet (8 to 14 meters) high,” Kwasnik...

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The best ski resorts in North America

By The Active Times Published November 12, 2013 FoxNews.com Let’s start by stating the obvious: there are a lot of great ski resorts out there. Far more, even, than the 80 we put on our initial list when we set out to pick the top picks in North America—which is why we asked for your help. The results are in. Your participation did more than help us make unkind cuts and add color commentary. It showed an appreciation for just how many ways a resort can stand out, be it through a bustling base village, frequent powder days or a superb ski school for the kids. Not surprisingly, those twin stalwarts of destination skiing, Colorado and Vermont, ran away with it. A perfect dozen from the Rocky Mountain State—including the number one spot—set the tone for resorts in western states: big. Big mountains with huge drops, sprawling ski areas that span multiple peaks, outsized terrain parks and endless buffets of winter activities and luxurious amenities. Vermont’s picks, while not as massive as their western counterparts, helped prove that the Rockies don’t have a lock on great skiing. Old standbys like Stowe and Jay Peak were popular with voters, and picks like Smugglers’ Notch, with its triple black diamond run, demonstrate that New England can satisfy even the most adrenaline-addicted powder junkie. Not far behind was Utah—with most resorts within a few miles of each other. There was no higher concentration of incredible skiing and snowboarding on our list than in Utah’s Wasatch range, which lies between Salt Lake City and Park City. This has to do, in large part, with the Utah’s slogan, “The Greatest Snow on Earth.” Many of these resorts average around 500 inches a year—that’s over 41 feet—and as recently as 2011 some posted figures as high as 776 inches. You’d have to work very hard to run out of fresh powder there. British Columbia’s so-called “Powder Highway” gave the Canadian province a strong showing, independent of its mega-resort Whistler Blackcomb. The Lake Tahoe area of Northern California also notched three spots. In making the final list, we combined publicly available stats, other expert lists and—with added weight, of course—our own survey results. 1Vail (Vail, Colo.) Vail Mountain Resort The second-largest resort in the U.S. is also America’s favorite, at least by the numbers. It’s no wonder: The wide variety of terrain spread out over Vail Mountain is enough to satisfy every level of skier and snowboarder. There are the miles and miles of groomed runs on the front side of the mountain, and for expert skiers there are the Back Bowls and Blue Sky Basin. “Take your pick if you love bowl skiing,” wrote one reader....

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Taking the kids — and eating healthier — and better — in ski country

By Eileen Ogintz Published March 01, 2013 FoxNews.com Christian Apetz, executive chef at 8100 Mountainside Bar and Grill at the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa, teaches âtween guests healthy recipes and cooking techniques with complimentary culinary classes each week. (Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort) Stowe Mountain Lodge (Stowe Mountain Lodge) Vail celebrity chef, Kelly Liken. (Studio JK Photography) Dogsled to dinner with Krabloonik in Snowmass. (Jason Dewey) Next Slide Previous Slide I don’t know where to look first. Above us, constellations glitter in Utah’s clear night sky. But right in front of us Chef Joe Walker lights up the backcountry another way — by putting on a spirited fire show in the snow, twirling torches impossibly fast in each hand. We snowshoed in under lantern light to the small yurt (no more than 20 guests!) at Solitude Mountain Resort for a five-course dinner (the $100 per person tab would have been considerably more in a major city) that was all the more impressive when Chef Joe explained that he cooked without electricity, starting with tomato black bean lentil soup, continuing with baby kale salad topped with salmon and goat cheese, pan seared scallops, duck breast with polenta and finished with a pomegranate reduction. Dessert? The best bread pudding I’ve ever eaten — made with apple and topped with ice cream and caramel sauce. Maybe you’d rather dogsled to lunch or dinner — you can at Snowmass where you are served game and fresh fish. Boy, how food in ski country has changed — on the mountain as well as off — especially for kids. Forget mac and cheese, unless it is homemade with local cheese. Forget chili, unless it’s vegetarian or made with local grass-fed beef. The kids — and you — have your choice of free-range chicken, homemade soups, pizza baked in a wood-fired oven and quinoa salad, not to mention artisanal beers and spirits. (Even Park City, Utah has its own High West Distillery where, incidentally, kids love the food as much as the grown-ups. And no worries if you want gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian choices. “These days, they expect that we will have those and we are ready for them,” at each meal, said Deer Valley chef, Jodie Rogers. Gone are the days of overpriced greasy burgers and fries, says David Scott, the executive chef at Colorado’s Keystone Resort, which is piloting the National Restaurant Association’s Kids Live Well initiative for Vail Resorts this year. The initiative has been implemented across 120 brands and in some 33,000 restaurants around the country and is designed to get kids eating more fruits and veggies, whole grains and lean proteins while limiting fats, sugar and sodium. (Participating restaurants and their qualifying items can be found on healthydiningfinder.com and via a free Kids Live Well...

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