Where to see the best fall foliage across the country

By Jacquelyn Hart | Fox News

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It’s not too late to leaf-peep!  (iStock)

Peak leaf-peeping season is almost over, but it’s not too late for those seeki…

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The 'Devil’s Swimming Pool' on the edge of Victoria Falls is for adrenaline junkies only

By Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure

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The Devil’s Swimming Pool is shallow natural pool atop Victoria Falls.  (Reuters)

Victoria Falls, without question…

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Moose hunter slams Facebook critics who called her 'disgusting'

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A hunter claims she’s received death threats for posting pictures from her Alaskan moose hunt on Facebook.  (iStock)

Hunting enthusiast Jessic…

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Deer hunting tips: 6 ways to find a buck you already scared off


By Gerald Almy

Hope isn’t lost just yet. Get back that buck with these expert tips.  (iStock)

“That’s it. It’s all over,” I thought. The 4-year-old 10-point buck that I had scouted, photographed, and painstakingly …

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How to heat a camping shelter without an indoor fire


By Tim MacWelch
Published June 01, 2017

A fire lay isn’t appropriate for an indoor sleeping shelter.  (Tim MacWelch)

Nothing in the backcountry gives off heat like a roaring fire. That’s why our recent ancestors built…

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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This secret room in Mount Rushmore is having a moment

This secret room in Mount Rushmore is having a moment

By Lauren Tousignant Published February 09, 2017 New York Post Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print  (National Parks Service) Next Abraham Lincoln holds the history of our country’s past. Literally. Tucked inside Lincoln’s frontal lobe in Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota, is a secret, inaccessible-to-the-public chamber. The vault was designed by the monument’s sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, who envisioned it as a room dedicated to the history of the United States. Expand / Contract A view from the rear of the Hall of Records chamber.(National Parks Service) The National Park Service details that Borglum wanted a written history of America’s greatest historical hits to go along with his four-headed sculpture, including an 800-foot stairway with a large bronze eagle – who’d have a 38-foot wingspan — at the entrance. Above the eagle an inscription would read, “America’s Onward March” and “The Hall of Records.” Carved into the walls would read America’s nine most important events from 1776 to 1906. Busts of famous Americans would line the hall, as well as a list of US contributions to art, science and industry. Unfortunately, Borglum died in 1941 and never saw his vision come to life. But in 1998, monument officials revived Borglum’s dream of the room acting as a vault for America’s history. Today, sculpted into a series of porcelain enamel panels, is the story and history of Mount Rushmore, along with an explanation of why Washington, Jefferson, Roosevelt, and Lincoln were chosen. This article originally appeared on...

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How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

How to safely handle and care for axes and hatchets

By Tim MacWelch Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Tips for keeping everyone’s favorite tool in top shape A good axe or hatchet can be a major player in camp life. This tool provides us with high-quality split firewood, and it saves us a lot of labor and time. It can help with specialized tasks also, like bow-making, bowl carving, and making camp furniture. But be careful! The axe is also one of the most dangerous tools in the woods. SAFETY FIRST —Don’t swing an axe downward in a “circle.” If you miss your target, you’ll chop into your knee, shin or foot. Instead, straighten out your swing at the end of the chop and drive the axe into your chopping block. And yes, you should be using a chopping block —Keep the axe head covered when transporting it. You should also use the cover while staying in camp, instead of leaving the tool lying around or stuck in a tree or a stump. BEST NEW RIFLES OF 2017 —When cutting branches off a tree, or putting in a notch to fell a tree – NEVER chop upward! A glancing blow can drive the axe into your neck, face or head. —Never swing an axe with a loose head. The axe head may literally “fly off the handle” and injure someone. MAINTENANCE SECOND When maintaining an axe, you’re really caring for two different materials – the metal axe head and the wooden axe handle. Your main chores with the axe head are rust removal and prevention, and sharpening the edge of the axe. A little rust is inevitable, and this can be easily removed by scouring the axe head with steel wool. Once cleaned, apply a thin coating of gun oil to prevent future rust. Other oils will work, in fact the pioneers used pig fat or bees wax to protect their tools, but gun oil is your best bet. It will dry somewhat once it’s applied and it’s long lasting. Your axe handle can be cleaned with a quick scouring of steel wool or fine grit sand paper. The handles useful life can be extended with an occasional wipe of boiled linseed oil. Make sure you choose boiled linseed oil, not the raw version. Raw linseed oil leaves a sticky residue that will not dry. A final handle chore involves the hafting. If an axe head becomes loose, you can try adjusting the wedges that hold it in place, but your best choice is to remove the wedge and rework the hafting. Or you could replace the handle. MICHIGAN CITY STERILIZES WILD DEER STAY SHARP A dull axe edge can be a dangerous liability, as you...

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Coyote Nation: A crash course in coyote hunting

Coyote Nation: A crash course in coyote hunting

By Tom Carpenter Published February 02, 2017 Facebook Twitter Email Print Next Ever adaptable and always elusive, Canis latrans thrives in varied landscapes across the country. Whether you’re working on your hundredth coyote or dreaming about dropping your first, our complete guide shows you how to hunt down success this winter It used to be that when small-game, upland bird, waterfowl, and big-game seasons ended, a hunter finally had a chance to pull up an easy chair next to a cozy fire, rest up, and reflect on an autumn well spent. Ditch that notion. Winter is time to hunt the hunter. Coyotes are out there waiting in habitat near you, and all you have to do is go after them to experience some of hunting’s knee-shakingest thrills. While the basics of coyote hunting are simple—set up with visibility and minimize movement; keep the wind in your face or crossing; call in dogs by appealing to their stomach, territoriality, or libido—success hinges on the details. It pays to match your approach to the habitat, and assemble your gear with meticulous care. Easy chairs are for old farts. Get out there now where the air is clean and the coyotes roam. RELATED: 10 Myths About Blood Trailing Deer BIG-TIMBER YAPPERS Coyotes in forested areas are spread out and challenging to find. But there are ways to locate them and bring them in. Strategies Though traditionally thought of as creatures of the wide-open West, coyotes have moved into timber country in untold numbers in recent years. The challenges of hunting expansive woods are clear: The cover never ends, and the calling noises you make will only reach so far. Here are three solutions. In flat country, search out clear-cuts, meadows, loggers’ landings, marsh edges, cover seams, and other openings, and set up there. You’ll gain much-needed visibility, your calls will carry farther, and you’ll be where the coyotes are—that combination of clearings, transition zones, and thick cover where prey (including cottontails, mice, voles, and moles) reside. In hill country, head for hollows, gullies, valleys, draws, washes, and other terrain that lets you set up on one side and survey the opposite slope for approaching varmints. In big timber habitat, set up often, call loudly, and wait a short time (15 to 20 minutes, with three to five distress calling sequences in there), then move on. Covering ground, and lots of it, is the way to find a coyote that will hear you; the dogs have many places to be, and call sounds do not carry far. There’s another secret to shooting coyotes where the cover sprawls on forever: Scout hard. Here are three effective approaches. Spend a starlit winter evening out in...

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Island nation of Palau only wants rich tourists to visit

Island nation of Palau only wants rich tourists to visit

Published January 17, 2017 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Got cash? Palau is seeking tourists with deep pockets.  (iStock) If you’re planning a trip to see the coral reefs and picturesque rock islands of Palau in the Pacific Ocean, you may want to bring a few extra bucks. Make that a stack of hundreds. Palau’s president Tommy Remengesau has proposed a new law that would make it very difficult for travelers on a budget by allowing on five-star hotels throughout the nation’s islands. According to The Telegraph, Remengesau is pushing for a “quality rather than quantity” tourism strategy. ENVIRONMENTALISTS SLAM NICKELODEON’S PROPOSED UNDERWATER THEME PARK “It’s kind of a win-win situation for Palau and the investor,” Remengesau told reporters earlier this month, as hotels would be rewarded by the government for bringing infrastructure to the island with “the necessary tax breaks and exemptions.” But are tourists without deep pockets losing out? The president’s proposal comes amid heightened complaints in recent years of an overwhelming influx of Chinese tourists. Palau had 141,000 visitors in 2014– up 34-percent from 2013. By February 2015, mainland Chinese visitors had increased by more than 500-percent to 10,955, according to The Straits Times. That’s more than half of Palau’s total population. Tourism accounts for the the majority of Palau’s GDP at 85-percent but the “damage” to the sudden increase of visitors was proving to be costly, according to some locols. The influx of tourists may lead to the destruction of coral reefs, general overcrowding and wildlife disturbance on the islands. Amid growing concern, Palau’s government cut the number of charter flights from China in 2015 by half. Accordingly, “while the numbers went down, the actual tourist spending went up,” said Remengesau. “Do we want to control growth or do we want growth to control us?” he questioned in 2015. “It will be irresponsible for me as a leader if this trend continues. I am not only looking at the present but, as a leader, I am looking after tomorrow.” FOR THE LATEST TRAVEL FEATURES FOLLOW FOX LIFESTYLE ON FACEBOOK Now, it appears the president is satisfied with his decision to control the amount of tourists who visit the island. “It confirms our direction [to attract] less tourists who spend more which equates to more tax dollars,” he said. “We [will] go for quality rather than quantity… to create a goal of high-end, high-value tourism.” There are currently just a handful of five-star resorts in Palau, many of which are on the populous island of...

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Hawaii braces for another foot of snow

Hawaii braces for another foot of snow

Published December 04, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print This webcam image shows the CFHT telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island covered in snow on Dec. 1, 2016.  (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope via AP) Hawaii is bracing Sunday for another foot of snow, in addition to the 2 feet that landed on the island’s highest mountain peaks since Thursday, The Weather Channel reported. The snow is falling on the peaks of the Big Island of Hawaii, including Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, and the National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the area through late Sunday night. “The snow level almost never gets below 9,000 feet in Hawaii during the winter, but since these mountains are taller than 13,600 feet, 13,700 feet and 10,000 feet, respectively, they get dusted with snow a few times a year,” said Ken Rubin of the University of Hawaii. “It rarely stays on the ground for more than a few days though.” The storm warning stated that an extra 6 to 12 inches of the white stuff may land above 11,000 feet, and winds could reach 15 to 30 mph. The snow, which has been falling since late last week on the Big Island’s volcanic summits, forced officials to close a section of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Fog, heavy snow and icy conditions also forced the closing of the road up to the Mauna Kea visitor station. A flood watch has been issued through Sunday afternoon for the rest of the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaii snow brings out the adventurous, but skiing is not for the faint of heart. The Hawaii Ski Club advises potential skiers and snowboarders to be careful because “there are no lifts, no grooming, no resort, but a road goes to the summit to serve the dozen or so world-class observatories located at the summit. You must have a 4-wheel drive vehicle to get to the summit, which serves as your ‘lift.'” Skiers can take turns driving, picking up other skiers at the bottom of the runs and transporting them back up to the summit. There has been 30 to 36 inches in recent winters, according to Ryan Lyman, forecast meteorologist with the Mauna Kea Weather Center. The Associated Press contributed to this...

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Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

Cabin Fever: 10 woodsy cabins you can rent out

By Katie Jackson Published November 28, 2016 FoxNews.com Facebook Twitter livefyre Email Print Escape Vista  (Steve Niedorf 2012) Next Long before the tiny-homes craze there was a fondness of log cabins. In 1916, John Lloyd Wright (son of the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright), invented Lincoln Logs. In creating this National Toy Hall of Famer, Wright brought the cabin concept into every other American living room. The first set even came with instructions on how to build Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Abraham Lincoln’s abode. A century later, our cabins can be accused of being too contemporary. However, they still conjure up feelings of comfort and a connection to nature. Whether you’re already a cabin living enthusiast or you’re just bored with hotel rooms, here are 10 cabins worth escaping to this winter. 1. Civil War-Era Cabin Travel back to the 1860s at this cabin built of beams repurposed from historic square-hewn log homes that survived the Civil War. One of the rental properties available at Missouri’s Top of the Rock resort, the 1,100-square-foot labor of luxury and love—the work of Amish craftsman and local carpenters—has commanding views of the Ozarks and Table Rock Lake. It’s a two-story home where good things come in twos. There are two master bedrooms, two bathrooms and two grand porches with golf course views. The hardest part of staying here is deciding whether to soak in the traditional copper tub or to stand under the stars in the outdoor shower made of stone. The Civil War-era cabin is bookable through Big Cedar Lodge for $500/night. 2. The Observatory at Alta Lakes Accessibility is not the biggest selling point of this backcountry cabin perched at 11,300 ft. in the Colorado Rockies. In winter, snowmobiles or cross-country skis are required to reach this dirt road retreat aptly named for its views of the surrounding San Juan Mountains and Telluride ski area. The cabin, which has been seen in commercials and on the cover of Nordstrom’s winter catalog, has two bedrooms and a sleeping loft with double bunk beds. Still, when they’re not soaking in the agate-lined hot tub, guests spend most of their indoor time around the massive wood-burning fireplace or detoxing in the sauna. Rates at the pet-friendly Observatory start at $750/night. (The price includes a complimentary oxygen supply for those needing help acclimating to the altitude.)  3. Tiny-House Cabana Located in Coldwater Gardens, a popular agrotourism destination in Florida’s Panhandle, the Tiny-House Cabana is perfect for travelers looking to stay in a labyrinth of shitake mushrooms, European honey bees, giant sunflowers and the latest aquaponics and hydroponics projects the five-acre property is undertaking. The climate-controlled one-bedroom cabin is designed for a seamless transition from...

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